Searching for: "Margaret MacMillan"

  • Julian Barnes

    A group of notable writers—including UK poet laureate Simon Armitage, Julian Barnes, Margaret MacMillan, and Jenny Uglow—celebrate our fascination with the houses of famous literary figures, artists, composers, and politicians of the past What can a house tell us about the person who lives there? Do we shape the buildings we live in, or are we formed by the places we call home? And why are we especially fascinated by the houses of the famous and often long-dead? In Lives of Houses, a group of notable biographers, historians, critics, and poets explores these questions and more through fascinating essays on the houses of great writers, artists, composers, and politicians of the...read more

  • Margaret MacMillan

    The world will never see another peace conference like the one that took place in Paris in 1919. For six months, the world's major leaders - including Woodrow Wilson, president of the United States, David Lloyd George, prime minister of Great Britain, and Georges Clemenceau, prime minister of France - met to discuss the peace settlements to end World War I. They faced huge issues and, as the weeks went by, their agenda...read more

  • Margaret MacMillan

    The author behind the New York Times best-sellers Paris 1919 and Nixon & Mao, Margaret MacMillan presents a remarkable treatise on history's importance. 'MacMillan is a superb writer who can bring history to life.'-Philadelphia...read more

  • Margaret MacMillan

    NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • The Economist • The Christian Science Monitor • Bloomberg Businessweek • The Globe and Mail From the bestselling and award-winning author of Paris 1919 comes a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, a fascinating portrait of Europe from 1900 up to the outbreak of World War I.   The century since the end of the Napoleonic wars had been the most peaceful era Europe had known since the fall of the Roman Empire. In the first years of the twentieth century, Europe believed it was marching to a golden, happy, and prosperous future. But instead, complex personalities and rivalries,...read more

  • Margaret MacMillan

    Winner of the Samuel Johnson Prize, renowned historian Margaret MacMillan's best-selling Paris 1919 is the story of six remarkable months that changed the world. At the close of WWI, between January and July of 1919, delegates from around the world converged on Paris under the auspices of peace. New countries were created, old empires were dissolved, and for six months, Paris was the center of the world. Bringing to vivid life the individuals who participated in the great Peace Conference--including Woodrow Wilson, Winston Churchill, Lawrence of Arabia, and Ho Chi Minh--Paris 1919 is a landmark work of narrative...read more

  • Margaret MacMillan

    With the publication of her landmark bestseller Paris 1919, Margaret MacMillan was praised as 'a superb writer who can bring history to life' (The Philadelphia Inquirer). Now she brings her extraordinary gifts to one of the most important subjects today-the relationship between the United States and China-and one of the most significant moments in modern history. In February 1972, Richard Nixon, the first American president ever to visit China, and Mao Tse-tung, the enigmatic Communist dictator, met for an hour in Beijing. Their meeting changed the course of history and ultimately laid the groundwork for the complex relationship between China and the United States that we see today. That...read more

  • Margaret Macmillan

    The story of the Paris Peace Conference of 1919, when for six extraordinary months the city was at the centre of world government as the peacemakers wound up bankrupt empires and created new countries. Between January and July 1919, after the war to end all wars, world leaders converged on Paris for the Peace Conference. At its heart were three great powers - Woodrow Wilson, Lloyd George and Clemenceau. The peacemakers, so it has been said, failed dismally; failed above all to prevent another war. Margaret MacMillan argues that they have unfairly been made scapegoats for the mistakes of those who came later. Their goals - to make defeated countries pay without destroying them, to satisfy...read more