Searching for: "Mark Twain"

  • Mark Twain

    The surprising final chapter of a great American life. When the first volume of Mark Twain’s uncensored Autobiography was published in 2010, it was hailed as an essential addition to the shelf of his works and a crucial document for our understanding of the great humorist’s life and times. This third and final volume crowns and completes his life’s work. Like its companion volumes, it chronicles Twain’s inner and outer life through a series of daily dictations that go wherever his fancy leads. Created from March 1907 to December 1909, these dictations present Mark Twain at the end of his life: receiving an honorary degree from Oxford University; railing against Theodore...read more

  • Philip C. Stead

    A never-before-published, previously unfinished Mark Twain children’s story is brought to life by Caldecott Medal winners Philip Stead and Erin Stead.   In a hotel in Paris one evening in the 1879, Mark Twain sat with his young daughters, who begged their father for a story. Choosing a picture from a magazine to get started, Twain began telling them the tale of Johnny, a poor boy in possession of some magical seeds, who finds himself on a quest to rescue a stolen prince. Later, Twain would jot down some rough notes about the story, but the tale was left unfinished . . . until now.   Plucked from the Mark Twain archives at the University of California, Berkeley,...read more

  • Mark Twain

    Three of Mark Twain’s classic short stories, originally broadcast in the ‘Afternoon Reading’ slot on BBC Radio 4 from 9 - 11 November 2010, to accompany the 'Autobiography of Mark Twain' (aired on ‘Book of the Week'). Read by Stuart Milligan. Twain’s classic short stories, with their familiar trademarks of high farce and droll insight, bring us eccentric burglars, cossetted children, and a visitor to a theme park obsessed with the making of mocassins. And also torrents of water... ‘The McWilliamses and The Burglar Alarm’: Surely their home would be better off with a state of the art security device - if it works, that is... ‘The Experience of the McWilliamses with...read more

  • Mark Twain

    Four delightful essays penned by Mark Twain, including “How To Tell a Story”, performed by Mark Redfield as Twain. Recorded before a live audience. CREDITS: Written by Mark Twain. Adapted and edited for performance by Mark...read more

  • M. J. Elliott

    In this faithful adaptation of Mark Twain''s immortal classic, two boys, one a pauper and the other a prince, discover that they share an incredible likeness and accidentally find their roles in life reversed. The young prince must now contend with London''s criminals, vagabonds and lunatics, while the pauper finds that he has a country to run, and internal plots to thwart. Can the real prince reclaim his right before an imposter is crowned in his place? And will his look-alike give up his regal position and return to a life of poverty? An adventure for the young and young at heart, bursting with non-stop excitement, wit and warmth, as the spirit of Twain's beloved classic comes to life...read more

  • O. Henry

    Two tales from two of the great American humorists. In “A Dog’s Tale”, Mark Twain let’s the dog do the talking, in a heart-wrenching story of her loss of a pup at the hands of her human master. In “Memoirs of a Yellow Dog”, O. Henry lets the dog of the title spin a humorous tale of liberation and freedom from the confines of a drab New York life for himself and his...read more

  • Mark Twain

    In ‘The Experience of the McWilliamses with Membranous Croup’, a strange fever is afflicting the neighbourhood just as little Penelope begins to cough. Though the reason is hardly clear cut... Read by Stuart Milligan and produced by Duncan Minshull. Originally broadcast in the ‘Afternoon Reading’ slot on BBC Radio 4 on 10 November 2010, to accompany the 'Autobiography of Mark Twain' (aired on ‘Book of the...read more

  • Mark Twain

    In ‘The McWilliamses and The Burglar Alarm’ it becomes apparent that their home would be better off with a state of the art security device - if it works, that is... Read by Stuart Milligan and produced by Duncan Minshull. Originally broadcast in the ‘Afternoon Reading’ slot on BBC Radio 4 on 9 November 2010, to accompany the 'Autobiography of Mark Twain' (aired on ‘Book of the...read more

  • Mark Twain

    In ‘Niagara’, the McWilliamses plan a day trip to those intrepid Falls to tramp exciting trails and meet some friendly Red Indians. But the best laid plans... Read by Stuart Milligan and produced by Duncan Minshull. Originally broadcast in the ‘Afternoon Reading’ slot on BBC Radio 4 on 9 November 2010, to accompany the 'Autobiography of Mark Twain' (aired on ‘Book of the...read more

  • Mark Twain

    Sketches New and Old is a compilation of fictional stories written by Mark Twain. Among them is "A Ghost Story". In each story, one can catch a great sense of Twain's humor and creativity. These classic sketches from Twain are no longer than 10 minutes, but all show his quick witted humor in response to the events of the day. A real storyteller can make a great story out of anything, even the most trivial occurrence. Composed between 1863 and 1875, the sixty-three often outrageous sketches in Sketches, New and Old contain, for instance, a piece about the difficulty of getting a pocket watch repaired properly; complaints about barbers and office bores;...read more

  • Mark Twain

    Having just lost a daughter to meningitis, Mark Twain wrote this book out of outrage toward the Christian Science movement and its founder Mary Baker Eddy. This movement emphasized the effects of prayer on healing the body and relieving sicknesses and other ailments. Although the founder of Christian Science appears to be altruistic with good intentions, Twain saw fraudulence and greed. Using his humor and wit, Mark Twain picks apart the movement in hopes of opening eyes to its...read more

  • Mark Twain

    In A Tramp Abroad, the ever adventurous Mark Twain brings his wit and creativity to his travels in Europe. Twain takes fictional liberty, turning his travels into an entertaining journey as he visits many of the countries of Central Europe. Listeners are sure to be delighted and humored as they enjoy what is considered by many to be one of Mark Twain's best...read more

  • Mark Twain

    Un relato en el que Mark Twain pone de manifiesto sus hilarantes y poco ortodoxas opiniones sobre la religión, ahora para escuchar. «Me gusta una buena historia bien contada. Por esta razón, a veces me veo obligado a contarlas yo mismo». Con estas palabras Mark Twain, según Hemingway, el padre indiscutible de la literatura estadounidense, defendía sus cuentos, hábilmente tramados, de inventiva inagotable y personajes inolvidables. El diario de Adán y Eva (1893-1905), una divertidísima y por tanto poco ortodoxa reconstrucción de la vida en el Jardín del Edén, es una excelente muestra. Los mejores relatos para...read more

  • Mark Twain

    “I’ve struck it!” Mark Twain wrote in a 1904 letter to a friend. “And I will give it away—to you. You will never know how much enjoyment you have lost until you get to dictating your autobiography.” Thus, after dozens of false starts and hundreds of pages, Twain embarked on his “Final (and Right) Plan” for telling the story of his life. His innovative notion—to “talk only about the thing which interests you for the moment”—meant that his thoughts could range freely. The strict instruction that many of these texts remain unpublished for one hundred years meant that when they came out, he would be “dead, and...read more

  • Mark Twain Project

    Irreverent, charming, and eminently quotable, this handbook-an eccentric etiquette guide for the human race-contains sixty-nine aphorisms, anecdotes, whimsical suggestions, maxims, and cautionary tales from Mark Twain's private and published writings. It dispenses advice and reflections on family life and public manners; opinions on topics such as dress, health, food, and childrearing and safety; and more specialized tips, such as those for dealing with annoying salesmen and burglars. Culled from Twain's personal letters, autobiographical writings, speeches, novels, and sketches, these pieces are delightfully fresh, witty, startlingly relevant, and bursting with Twain's characteristic...read more

  • Mark Twain

    In Life on the Mississippi, the great American humorist Mark Twain recounts his journeys on the mighty Mississippi river. Covering the beginnings of his career as steamboat pilot, Twain entertains us with his wit, anecdotes and wild stories of the myriad characters and adventures he encounters. From a brief history of the Mississippi we are taken on to a recollection of the river life with its rich history and engaging narrative, newcomers and fans of Twain...read more

  • Mark Twain

    “[Twain] was, in the phrase of his friend William Dean Howells, ‘the Lincoln of our literature’... At the heart of his work lies that greatest of all American qualities: irreverence.” — Washington Post “More than 100 years after [Twain] wrote these stories, they remain not only remarkably funny but remarkably modern.... Ninety-nine years after his death, Twain still manages to get the last laugh.” — Vanity Fair Who Is Mark Twain? is a collection of twenty six wickedly funny, thought-provoking essays by Samuel Langhorne Clemens—aka Mark Twain—none of which have ever been published before, and all of which are completely contemporary, amazingly relevant, and...read more

  • Mark Twain

    Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910), better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist. Twain is most noted for his novels 'Adventures of Huckleberry Finn' and 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer'. Compiled and performed by James Carroll Jordan, this is an entertaining take on Mark Twain's tales of his travels around the world relating to women he has observed and met. Jordan presents the stories much as Mark Twain may have done himself in his days on the lecture circuit in the 19th...read more

  • Mark Twain

    Mark Twain's daughter, Susy, wrote: "Papa...doesn't like to go to church at all, why I never understood, until just now, he told us the other day that he couldn't bear to hear any one talk but himself, but that he could listen to himself talk for hours without getting tired, of course he said this in joke, but I've no dought [sic] it was founded on truth."-from the book Here is one of the great autobiographies of the English language: exuberant, wonderfully contemporary in spirit, written by a man twice as large as life, who-he said so himself-had no trouble remembering everything that had ever happened to him, and a lot of things besides. Nothing ever happened to Mark Twain in a small...read more

  • Mark Twain

    Is Shakespeare Dead? is a short, semi-autobiographical work by American humorist Samuel Clemens, better known as Mark Twain. It explores the controversy over the authorship of the Shakespearean literary canon via satire, anecdote, and extensive quotation of contemporary authors on the subject. The original publication spans only 150 pages, and the formatting leaves roughly half of each page blank. The spine is thread bound. It was published in April of 1909 by Harper & Brothers, twelve months before Mark Twain's death. In the book, Clemens clearly states his opinion that Shakespeare of Stratford was not the author of the canon, and lends tentative support to the Baconians. The book...read more