Searching for: "Nathaniel Hawthorne"

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    Nathaniel Hawthorne - An Introduction. Nathaniel Hawthorne was born in 1804 in the city of Salem, Massachusetts. His father, a sea captain died when Nathaniel was 4 and Nathaniel always a shy child spent his early years with his Mother and two sisters. Hit on the leg by a ball, doctors could finds nothing wrong but he went lame and was bedridden for a year. He entered Bowdoin College in 1821, and graduated in 1825. Hawthorne anonymously published his first work, the novel 'Fanshawe', in 1828. He continued to publish in various periodicals which he collected in 1837 as Twice-Told Tales. The next year, he became engaged to Sophia Peabody eventually marrying her in 1842. His...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    On July 28, 1851, Nathaniel Hawthorne's wife left their house in Western Massachusetts to visit relatives. Hawthorne and his five-year-old son Julian stayed behind. How father and son got on together for the next three weeks is the subject of Twenty Days with Julian & Little Bunny, by Papa, a tender and funny extract from Hawthorne's notebooks, perhaps one of the earliest accounts in literature of a father caring for a young child. Each day starts early and will be given over to swimming and skipping stones, berry picking and subduing armies of thistles. At one point Mr. Herman Melville comes over to enjoy a late night discussion of eternity over cigars. With an introduction by Paul...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    Complete with seven short stories, this is the definitive anthology for Nathaniel Hawthorne fans. Hawthorne's dark romanticism and cultural commentary made him a staple of nineteenth-century American literature. Dive into the works that made him famoua, such as the chilling "Young Goodman Brown". Hawthorne delved deep into the human soul with his work, and now you can delve deep into his soul with this...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    On July 28, 1851, Nathaniel Hawthorne's wife left their house in Western Massachusetts to visit relatives. Hawthorne and his five-year-old son Julian stayed behind. How father and son got on together for the next three weeks is the subject of Twenty Days with Julian & Little Bunny, by Papa, a tender and funny extract from Hawthorne's notebooks, perhaps one of the earliest accounts in literature of a father caring for a young child. Each day starts early and will be given over to swimming and skipping stones, berry picking and subduing armies of thistles. At one point Mr. Herman Melville comes over to enjoy a late night discussion of eternity over cigars. With an introduction by Paul...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    The Scarlet Letter' - published first in 1850, was in its time considered as an innovative and at the same time scandalous novel, written by Nathaniel Hawthorne. This book was strongly disapproved by the fellow countrymen of the author and banned by the Russian tsars Now 'The Scarlet Letter' is included in the school curriculum. 'The Scarlet Letter' tells the story of Hester Prynne, who conceives a daughter through an affair and struggles to create a new life of repentance and dignity. For the Puritan Boston in the 17th century New England, this is a terrible violation of morality. Hester is therefore paraded through the town, holding her baby and wearing the red letter "A" that marks an...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    Introduction by Kathryn Harrison Commentary by Nathaniel Hawthorne, W. D. Howells, and Carl Van Doren   A stark tale of adultery, guilt, and social repression in Puritan New England, The Scarlet Letter is a foundational work of American literature. Nathaniel Hawthorne’s exploration of the dichotomy between the public and private self, internal passion and external convention, gives us the unforgettable Hester Prynne, who discovers strength in the face of ostracism and emerges as a heroine ahead of her time. As Kathryn Harrison points out in her Introduction, Hester is “the herald of the modern heroine.”   Includes a Modern Library Reading Group...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    Nathaniel Hawthorne was born in 1804 in the city of Salem, Massachusetts. His father, a sea captain died when Nathaniel was 4 and Nathaniel always a shy child spent his early years with his Mother and two sisters. Hit on the leg by a ball, doctors could finds nothing wrong but he went lame and was bedridden for a year. He entered Bowdoin College in 1821, and graduated in 1825. Hawthorne anonymously published his first work, the novel ‘Fanshawe’, in 1828. He continued to publish in various periodicals which he collected in 1837 as Twice-Told Tales. The next year, he became engaged to Sophia Peabody eventually marrying her in 1842.His defining work ‘The Scarlet Letter’ was published...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    The scarlet letter was her passport into regions where other women dared not to tread. Shame, Despair, Solitude! These had been her teachers -- stern and wild ones -- and they had made her strong, but taught her much amiss. -- Nathaniel Hawthorne As she emerges from the prison of a Puritan New England town, Hester Prynne defies the dark gloom much as the rose blooms against the prison door. With her illegitimate baby, Pearl, clutched in her arms and the letter A -- the mark of an adulteress -- embroidered in scarlet thread on her breast, Hester holds her head high as she faces the malice and scorn of the townsfolk. Her powerful, bittersweet story is an American classic that continues...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    Penguin Classics presents Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, adapted for audio and available as a digital download as part of the Penguin English Library series. Read by the actor Bob Sessions. 'Shame, Despair, Solitude! These had been her teachers, - stern and wild ones, - and they had made her strong, but taught her much amiss' Fiercely romantic and hugely influential, The Scarlet Letter is the tale of Hester Prynne, imprisoned, publicly shamed, and forced to wear a scarlet 'A' for committing adultery and bearing an illegitimate child, Pearl. In their small, Puritan village, Hester and her daughter struggle to survive, but in this searing study of the tension between private...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    The Scarlet Letter is generally considered to be Nathaniel Hawthorne’s masterpiece. Set in 17th century Boston, it follows the plight of Hester Prynne, a young woman who bears a child out of wedlock, refuses to name the father, and is condemned to wear a scarlet ‘A’ for the rest of her life. With The Scarlet Letter, Hawthorne reaches back to America’s Puritan roots to probe themes of lust, sin, guilt and redemption. This Essential Classics edition includes a new introduction by Professor Vivian Heller, Ph.D. in literature and modern studies from Yale University. Born in 1804, Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote at the forefront of dark romanticism. His renderings of colonial America...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    Gothic Tales Of Terror - Volume5. This collection of short stories contains several gothic tales to bear macabre and chilling witness to writers as diverse as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Elizabeth Gaskell, Edgar Allan Poe, Wilkie Collins and Edith Nesbit. These tales are designed to unsettle you, just a little, as you sit back, and take in their words as they lead you on a walk to places you'd perhaps rather not visit on your own. Our stories are The Wedding Knell by Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Old Nurse's Story by Elizabeth Gaskell, The Premature Burial by Edgar Allan Poe, Dream Woman by Wilkie Collins and Edith Nesbit by The Ebony Frame. These stories are read for you by many readers including...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    "Mosses from an Old Manse" is a short story collection by Nathaniel Hawthorne, first published in 1846. The collection includes several previously-published short stories and is named in honor of The Old Manse where Hawthorne and his wife lived for the first three years of their marriage. A second edition was published in 1854, which added "Feathertop," "Passages from a Relinquished Work, and "Sketches from Memory." Many of the tales collected in "Mosses from an Old Manse" are allegories and, typical of Hawthorne, focus on the negative side of human nature. Hawthorne's friend Herman Melville noted this aspect in his review "Hawthorne and His Mosses": "This black conceit pervades him through...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American author whose writing centers around inherent evil, sins, and morality. Many of his stories take place in New England. His fiction works are considered part of the Romantic movement and, more specifically, dark romanticism.  Frank Marcopolos (1972-) is the founder of The Whirligig literary magazine, a novelist, voice-over artist, podcaster, and Learning Ally volunteer. He currently lives in the recording studio at The Bookquarium in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Listeners have called his distinctive narration style 'thee perfect way to listen to audiobooks' and 'Fabulous. I loved listening!' His YouTube channel, where he posts free...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    In the House of the Seven Gables, Nathaniel Hawthorne explores themes of guilt, retribution, and atonement in a New England family and colors the tale with suggestions of the supernatural and witchcraft. An evil house, cursed through the centuries by a man who was hanged for witchcraft, is haunted by the ghosts of its sinful dead and wracked by the fear of its frightened living. The story was inspired by a gabled house in Salem belonging to Hawthorne's cousin Susanna Ingersoll and by those of Hawthorne's ancestors who played a part in the Salem Witch Trials of 1692. Written as a follow-up to The Scarlet Letter, The House of the Seven Gables is truly a masterful blending of the actual and...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    First published in 1850, The Scarlet Letter is Nathaniel Hawthorne's masterpiece and one of the greatest American novels. Its themes of sin, guilt, and redemption, woven through a story of adultery in the early days of the Massachusetts Colony, are revealed with remarkable psychological penetration and understanding of the human heart. The book's immediate and lasting success are due to the way it addresses spiritual and moral issues from a uniquely American standpoint. In 1850, adultery was an extremely risqué subject, but because Hawthorne had the support of the New England literary establishment, it passed easily into the realm of appropriate reading. It has been said that this work...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    First published in 1850, The Scarlet Letter is Nathaniel Hawthorne's masterpiece and one of the greatest American novels. Its themes of sin, guilt, and redemption, woven through a story of adultery in the early days of the Massachusetts Colony, are revealed with remarkable psychological penetration and understanding of the human heart. The book's immediate and lasting success are due to the way it addresses spiritual and moral issues from a uniquely American standpoint. In 1850, adultery was an extremely risque subject, but because Hawthorne had the support of the New England literary establishment, it passed easily into the realm of appropriate reading. It has been said that this work...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    Twice-Told Tales is a short story collection in two volumes by Nathaniel Hawthorne. The first was published in the spring of 1837, and the second in 1842. The stories had all been previously published in magazines and annuals, hence the name. The title, Twice-Told Tales, was based on a line from William Shakespeare's The Life and Death of King John (Act 3, scene 4): 'Life is as tedious as a twice-told tale, / Vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man.' The quote referenced may also be Hawthorne's way of acknowledging a belief that many of his stories were ironic retellings of familiar tropes. The book was published by the American Stationers' Company on March 6, 1837; its cover price was one...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    The colorful characters from Greek mythology come alive in exciting adventures captured by the author of The House of the Seven Gables and The Scarlet Letter. Ride Pegasus, open Pandora' Box, kill Medea with her head of many snakes, join Hercules as he flexes his muscles and King Midas as he turn his daughter into gold. The stories, moral in tone, are totally riveting. A Wonder Book includes: 1. The Gorgon's Head 2. The Golden Touch 3. The Paradise of Children 4. The Three Golden Apples 5. The Miraculous Pitcher 6. The Chimæra AUTHOR Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) is considered to be one of the greatest American authors of the nineteenth century. Born in Salem,...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    Hailed by Henry James as "the finest piece of imaginative writing yet put forth in the country," Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter reaches to our nation's historical and moral roots for the material of great tragedy. Set in an early New England colony, the novel shows the terrible impact of a single passionate act on the lives of three people: the fiery, tortured Reverend Dimmesdale; the obsessed, vengeful Chillingworth; and the defiant Hester Prynne, who, unwilling to name her partner in adultery, is condemned to wear a scarlet "A" on the breast of her gown for the remainder of her life. She and her illegitimate daughter become outcasts, forced to live solitary lives-until...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    Vier Erzählungen von einem Meister unheimlicher Literatur. Zusammen mit Hermann Melville und Edgar Allan Poe zählt Hawthorne zur 'dunklen' amerikanischen Romantik. 'Moby Dick' von Hermann Melville ist Nathaniel Hawthorn gewidmet. (Quelle: Wikipedia) Summary by Bernd...read more