Searching for: "Oscar Wilde"

  • Oscar Wilde

    This collection of 20 bedtime stories will help your child drift into a peaceful sleep, by concluding his day with delightful adventures, important teachings and symbolic imagery for enlightening dreams. Classic children's stories and fairy tales are an essential part of any kid's development. Our audiobook collection means to bring together the fairy tales, stories, myths and legends which have fed the children of many generations in the years when the imagination is awakening and craving stimulus and material to work upon. This compilation, specially designed for small children, includes folk tales, classic tales by Charles Perrault and Hans Christian Andersen, and stories from the...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    El Retrato de Dorian Gray escrito por el famoso autor Oscar Wilde en 1890, es una novela filosófica que representa la obsesión sobre el poder de la juventud y la belleza. Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) había querido hacer de la belleza un refinamiento de la inteligencia, y para ello sumió a su protagonista, Dorian Gray, en una atmósfera de perversión dominada por el arte y los poderes de un misterio que está más allá de la realidad: gracias a los dioses, el culto a la belleza puede trasladar las huellas del paso del tiempo a un cuadro, mientras el rostro de Dorian Gray permanece inalterado e inalterable, esta obra es sin duda un...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    Moral fantasy novel by Oscar Wilde, published in an early form in Lippincott's Magazine in 1890. The novel had six additional chapters when it appeared in book form in 1891. An archetypal tale of a young man who purchases eternal youth at the expense of his soul, the novel was a romantic exposition of Wilde's aestheticism. Dorian Gray is a wealthy Englishman who gradually sinks into a life of dissipation and crime. Despite his unhealthy behavior, his physical appearance remains youthful and unmarked by dissolution. Instead, a portrait of himself catalogues every evil deed by turning his once handsome features into a hideous mask. When Gray destroys the painting, his face turns into a human...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    Written in his distinctively dazzling manner, Oscar Wilde's story of a fashionable young man who sells his soul for eternal youth and beauty is the author's most popular work. The tale of Dorian Gray's moral disintegration caused a scandal when it first appeared in 1890, but though Wilde was attacked for the novel's corrupting influence, he responded that there is, in fact, 'a terrible moral in Dorian Gray.' Just a few years later, the book and the aesthetic/moral dilemma it presented became issues in the trials occasioned by Wilde's homosexual liaisons, which resulted in his imprisonment. Of Dorian Gray's relationship to autobiography, Wilde noted in a letter, 'Basil Hallward is what I...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    Written in his distinctively dazzling manner, Oscar Wilde's story of a fashionable young man who sells his soul for eternal youth and beauty is the author's most popular work. The tale of Dorian Gray's moral disintegration caused a scandal when it first appeared in 1890, but though Wilde was attacked for the novel's corrupting influence, he responded that there is, in fact, 'a terrible moral in Dorian Gray.' Just a few years later, the book and the aesthetic/moral dilemma it presented became issues in the trials occasioned by Wilde's homosexual liaisons, which resulted in his imprisonment. Of Dorian Gray's relationship to autobiography, Wilde noted in a letter, 'Basil Hallward is what I...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    'The Soul of Man' is an 1891 essay by Oscar Wilde in which he expounds a libertarian socialist worldview and a critique of charity. The writing of 'The Soul of Man' followed Wilde's conversion to anarchist philosophy, following his reading of the works of Peter Kropotkin. In 'The Soul of Man' Wilde argues that, under capitalism, 'the majority of people spoil their lives by an unhealthy and exaggerated altruism-are forced, indeed, so to spoil them': instead of realising their true talents, they waste their time solving the social problems caused by capitalism, without taking their common cause away. Thus, caring people 'seriously and very sentimentally set themselves to the task of...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    Known as one of the greatest comedies written in English, Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest attacks Victorian manners and morals in what can only be described as the most maliciously delicious way. A witty satire of Victorian social hypocrisy, Wilde pulls the strings on his cast of late-Victorian characters making them appear, first and foremost, exactly as they are-superficial, upper class Englishmen bound and cinched by an artificial code of manners.Jack Worthington has invented a rakish brother, Ernest, who calls Jack away from family duties and gives him an excuse to travel to London. Similarly, Algernon Moncrieff has created the persona of Bunbury, an invalid friend, who...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    Oscar Wilde's first play confronts the hypocrisy of public 'morality' compared with genuine, private kindness. When it opened in 1892, Lady Windermere's Fan was an instant success and now, a century later, it continues to be revived frequently. The reasons for its popularity are not difficult to identify the play's witty dialogue contains many of Wilde's most quoted aphorisms, its stylish setting provides opportunities for elegant presentation, and its cast of memorable characters play out a story which is genuinely moving. This new audiobook production brings together a cast worthy of Wilde's creative...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    A set of charming short stories for children by Oscar Wilde. Table of Contents: 1. The Happy Prince 2. The Nightingale and the Rose 3. The Selfish Giant 4. The Devoted Friend 5. The Remarkable Rocket The Happy Prince The tale of a statue of a prince how he teaches generosity and the gift of love to a small sparrow who becomes his friend. The Nightingale and the Rose A young Student is infatuated by the daughter of a Professor. She promises to dance with him till dawn at the Prince's ball if the Student will bring her a red rose. But in his garden there are no red roses. The Nightingale, who night after night romantically sings of such love as she believes she now sees...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    Devilishly attractive Lord Illingworth is notorious for his skill as a seducer. But he is still invited to all the “best” houses while his female conquests must hide their shame in seclusion. In this devastating comedy, Wilde uses his celebrated wit to expose English society’s narrow view of everything from sexual mores to Americans. Includes an interview with Oscar Wilde's only grandchild Merlin Holland, who is also a noted biographer and editor of Wilde's works. An L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring: Martin Jarvis as Lord Illingworth Peter Dennis as Sir John Pontefract Jim Norton as Mr. Kelvil, M.P. Robert Machray as The Ven. Archdeacon Daubeny, D.D. Paul...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    "The Ballad of Reading Gaol" was written by Oscar Wilde in France where he was in exile after his release from Reading Gaol. Wilde had been imprisoned and sentenced to two years hard labour. A hanging took place while Wilde was incarcerated and the poem is the narrative of the...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    The Picture of Dorian Gray is a Gothic, philosophical novel by Oscar Wilde, first published complete in the July 1890 issue of Lippincott's Monthly Magazine. Fearing the story was indecent, prior to publication the magazine's editor deleted roughly five hundred words without Wilde's knowledge. Despite that censorship, The Picture of Dorian Gray offended the moral sensibilities of many British book reviewers, some of whom said that Wilde merited prosecution for violating the laws guarding public morality. In response, he aggressively defended his novel and art in correspondence with the British press, although he personally made excisions of some of the most controversial material when...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    This is Oscar Wilde's tale of the American family moved into a British mansion, Canterville Chase, much to the annoyance of its tired ghost. The family -- which refuses to believe in him -- is in Wilde's way a commentary on the British nobility of the day -- and on the Americans, too. The tale, like many of Wilde's, is rich with allusion, but ends as sentimental romance....read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    This is Oscar Wilde's tale of the American family moved into a British mansion, Canterville Chase, much to the annoyance of its tired ghost. The family -- which refuses to believe in him -- is in Wilde's way a commentary on the British nobility of the day -- and on the Americans, too. The tale, like many of Wilde's, is rich with allusion, but ends as sentimental romance....read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    De Profundis (Latin: 'from the depths') is a 50,000 word letter written by Oscar Wilde during his imprisonment in Reading Gaol, to Lord Alfred Douglas, his lover. Wilde wrote the letter between January and March 1897; he was not allowed to send it, but took it with him upon release. In it he repudiates Lord Alfred for what Wilde finally sees as his arrogance and vanity; he had not forgotten Douglas's remark, when he was ill, 'When you are not on your pedestal you are not interesting.' He also felt redemption and fulfillment in his ordeal, realizing that his hardship had filled the soul with the fruit of experience, however bitter it tasted at the...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    De Profundis (Latin: 'from the depths') is a 50,000 word letter written by Oscar Wilde during his imprisonment in Reading Gaol, to Lord Alfred Douglas, his lover. Wilde wrote the letter between January and March 1897; he was not allowed to send it, but took it with him upon release. In it he repudiates Lord Alfred for what Wilde finally sees as his arrogance and vanity; he had not forgotten Douglas's remark, when he was ill, 'When you are not on your pedestal you are not interesting.' He also felt redemption and fulfillment in his ordeal, realizing that his hardship had filled the soul with the fruit of experience, however bitter it tasted at the...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    Oscar Wilde wurde am 16.10.1854 in Dublin geboren. Sein Vater war Arzt, seine Mutter Dichterin. Wilde studierte in Dublin und Oxford. Seit 1879 lebte er in London. 1895 wurde er vom Vater seines Freundes Lord Douglas wegen homosexueller Neigungen angezeigt und zu zwei Jahren Zuchthaus verurteilt. Wilde starb am 30.11.1900 verarmt in Paris. Der Sozialismus und die Seele des Menschen: Der größte Nutzen, den die Einführung des Sozialismus brächte, liegt ohne Zweifel darin, dass der Sozialismus uns von der schmutzigen Notwendigkeit, für andere zu leben, befreite, die beim jetzigen Stand der Dinge so schwer auf fast allen Menschen lastet. Es entgeht ihr in der Tat fast niemand. Aus dem...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    It is all to easy to be familiar with Oscar Wilde the aesthete. The limpid sophisticate ever ready with a witty epigram designed to both shock and stimulate. However, here in this set of short stories Wilde, at least partly, lays aside his barbs and is careful to not let cynicism cloud the parable like innocence of these tales.  There is an undeniable purity in these tales which Wilde’s simple lyrical style beautifully enhances. For all the hypocrisy of the Remarkable Rocket and the Miller we find the self-sacrifice of the Nightingale and the Swallow, the true repentance of the Giant and the heart-breaking compassion of the once Happy Prince deeply moving. Narrated by Simon...read more

  • George Gissing

    Science, better diet, advanced medicines are all part of a process that in the modern age keep most of us going to a ripe old age.In previous times some diseases could only be slowed and not defeated. There toil of relentless attack on our physical forms brought misery and decay. Add to this that within our number some will self-destruct, demons will pursue their inner thoughts and life will be too painful to bear. Some may shuffle off the mortal coil for no discernible reason, but life will end early, they will not take up their three-score year and ten.In this collection of short stories some of our most popular and well-known authors are grouped together with an unfortunate tag: dead at...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    This final play from the pen of Oscar Wilde is a stylish send-up of Victorian courtship and manners, complete with assumed names, mistaken lovers, and a lost handbag. Jack and Algernon are best friends, both wooing ladies who think their names are Ernest, "that name which inspires absolute confidence." Wilde's effervescent wit, scathing social satire, and high farce make this one of the most cherished plays in the English language. Includes an interview with director Michael Hackett, Professor of Theater in the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA. An L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring: James Marsters as Jack Charles Busch as Lady Bracknell Emily Bergl...read more