Searching for: "Oscar Wilde"

  • Oscar Wilde

    Oscar Wilde's first play confronts the hypocrisy of public 'morality' compared with genuine, private kindness. When it opened in 1892, Lady Windermere's Fan was an instant success and now, a century later, it continues to be revived frequently. The reasons for its popularity are not difficult to identify the play's witty dialogue contains many of Wilde's most quoted aphorisms, its stylish setting provides opportunities for elegant presentation, and its cast of memorable characters play out a story which is genuinely moving. This new audiobook production brings together a cast worthy of Wilde's creative...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    Devilishly attractive Lord Illingworth is notorious for his skill as a seducer. But he is still invited to all the “best” houses while his female conquests must hide their shame in seclusion. In this devastating comedy, Wilde uses his celebrated wit to expose English society’s narrow view of everything from sexual mores to Americans. Includes an interview with Oscar Wilde's only grandchild Merlin Holland, who is also a noted biographer and editor of Wilde's works. An L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring: Martin Jarvis as Lord Illingworth Peter Dennis as Sir John Pontefract Jim Norton as Mr. Kelvil, M.P. Robert Machray as The Ven. Archdeacon Daubeny, D.D. Paul...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    Los mejores libros en formato audiolibro. «La vida te lo reserva todo, Dorian. Con tu extraordinario atractivo, no hay nada que no puedas conseguir.» Basil Hallward había terminado el retrato. El joven Dorian, al verlo, no pudo más que desear, desde su frívola inocencia, que fuera su imagen la que envejeciera y se corrompiera con el paso de los años mientras él permanecía intacto. Y así fue: a partir de entonces, Dorian Gray conservó no solo la lozanía y la hermosura propias de la juventud, sino el aspecto puro de los inocentes. Pero ¿a qué precio? El retrato de Dorian Gray es un logro insoslayable de la literatura universal, vertido aquí magníficamente por...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    Este audiolibro está narrado en castellano. El protagonista de la historia es la estatua dorada de un príncipe, que se encuentra en lo alto de una columna desde donde puede ver toda la ciudad; y una golondrina, que ha retrasado su migración a África por el amor que sentía por una caña. La golondrina se posa sobre la estatua y ve que el príncipe está llorando a causa de las injusticias que puede observar desde su posición. Entonces le pide a la golondrina que entregue a los más necesitados las joyas que le adornan. El ave así lo hace y se queda con el príncipe, distribuyendo las joyas hasta que la estatua está completamente desprovista de oro y adornos. Pero el invierno...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    'But it is a very unimaginative nature that only cares for people on their pedestals. A pedestal may be a very unreal thing. A pillory is a terrific reality.' Thus wrote Oscar Wilde in a farewell letter to his lover Lord Alfred Douglas (Bosie) in 1897 while serving a two-year sentence for 'gross indecency with other male persons'. In it, he sorts out his life and his love for Bosie, who, he feels, abandoned him to his fate. It is an intensely personal letter that follows the stages of grief and interlaces the religious with art. It was published in 1905, five years after Wilde‘s death, and given the Latin title, `De Profundis‘ which translates to 'from the depths'. In 2016 Patti Smith...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    "The Ballad of Reading Gaol" was written by Oscar Wilde in France where he was in exile after his release from Reading Gaol. Wilde had been imprisoned and sentenced to two years hard labour. A hanging took place while Wilde was incarcerated and the poem is the narrative of the...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    The Picture of Dorian Gray is a Gothic, philosophical novel by Oscar Wilde, first published complete in the July 1890 issue of Lippincott's Monthly Magazine. Fearing the story was indecent, prior to publication the magazine's editor deleted roughly five hundred words without Wilde's knowledge. Despite that censorship, The Picture of Dorian Gray offended the moral sensibilities of many British book reviewers, some of whom said that Wilde merited prosecution for violating the laws guarding public morality. In response, he aggressively defended his novel and art in correspondence with the British press, although he personally made excisions of some of the most controversial material when...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    This is Oscar Wilde's tale of the American family moved into a British mansion, Canterville Chase, much to the annoyance of its tired ghost. The family -- which refuses to believe in him -- is in Wilde's way a commentary on the British nobility of the day -- and on the Americans, too. The tale, like many of Wilde's, is rich with allusion, but ends as sentimental romance....read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    This is Oscar Wilde's tale of the American family moved into a British mansion, Canterville Chase, much to the annoyance of its tired ghost. The family -- which refuses to believe in him -- is in Wilde's way a commentary on the British nobility of the day -- and on the Americans, too. The tale, like many of Wilde's, is rich with allusion, but ends as sentimental romance....read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    De Profundis (Latin: 'from the depths') is a 50,000 word letter written by Oscar Wilde during his imprisonment in Reading Gaol, to Lord Alfred Douglas, his lover. Wilde wrote the letter between January and March 1897; he was not allowed to send it, but took it with him upon release. In it he repudiates Lord Alfred for what Wilde finally sees as his arrogance and vanity; he had not forgotten Douglas's remark, when he was ill, 'When you are not on your pedestal you are not interesting.' He also felt redemption and fulfillment in his ordeal, realizing that his hardship had filled the soul with the fruit of experience, however bitter it tasted at the...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    De Profundis (Latin: 'from the depths') is a 50,000 word letter written by Oscar Wilde during his imprisonment in Reading Gaol, to Lord Alfred Douglas, his lover. Wilde wrote the letter between January and March 1897; he was not allowed to send it, but took it with him upon release. In it he repudiates Lord Alfred for what Wilde finally sees as his arrogance and vanity; he had not forgotten Douglas's remark, when he was ill, 'When you are not on your pedestal you are not interesting.' He also felt redemption and fulfillment in his ordeal, realizing that his hardship had filled the soul with the fruit of experience, however bitter it tasted at the...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    Oscar Wilde wurde am 16.10.1854 in Dublin geboren. Sein Vater war Arzt, seine Mutter Dichterin. Wilde studierte in Dublin und Oxford. Seit 1879 lebte er in London. 1895 wurde er vom Vater seines Freundes Lord Douglas wegen homosexueller Neigungen angezeigt und zu zwei Jahren Zuchthaus verurteilt. Wilde starb am 30.11.1900 verarmt in Paris. Der Sozialismus und die Seele des Menschen: Der größte Nutzen, den die Einführung des Sozialismus brächte, liegt ohne Zweifel darin, dass der Sozialismus uns von der schmutzigen Notwendigkeit, für andere zu leben, befreite, die beim jetzigen Stand der Dinge so schwer auf fast allen Menschen lastet. Es entgeht ihr in der Tat fast niemand. Aus dem...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    It is all to easy to be familiar with Oscar Wilde the aesthete. The limpid sophisticate ever ready with a witty epigram designed to both shock and stimulate. However, here in this set of short stories Wilde, at least partly, lays aside his barbs and is careful to not let cynicism cloud the parable like innocence of these tales.  There is an undeniable purity in these tales which Wilde’s simple lyrical style beautifully enhances. For all the hypocrisy of the Remarkable Rocket and the Miller we find the self-sacrifice of the Nightingale and the Swallow, the true repentance of the Giant and the heart-breaking compassion of the once Happy Prince deeply moving. Narrated by Simon...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    This final play from the pen of Oscar Wilde is a stylish send-up of Victorian courtship and manners, complete with assumed names, mistaken lovers, and a lost handbag. Jack and Algernon are best friends, both wooing ladies who think their names are Ernest, "that name which inspires absolute confidence." Wilde's effervescent wit, scathing social satire, and high farce make this one of the most cherished plays in the English language. Includes an interview with director Michael Hackett, Professor of Theater in the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA. An L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring: James Marsters as Jack Charles Busch as Lady Bracknell Emily Bergl...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    A House of Pomegranates is a collection of fairy tales, written by Oscar Wilde, that was published as a second collection for The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888). Wilde once said that this collection was "intended neither for the British child nor the British public." The stories included in this collection are as follows: The Young King The Birthday of the Infanta The Fisherman and his Soul The Star-Child (Summary by...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    A dark tale of hubris, lust, and self-destruction … as told by a man who famously fell prey to those same impulses in his own life. Oscar Wilde wrote his original interpretation of the Biblical story of Salomé in French, and the play was so controversial that no theatre in England would produce it for nearly four decades. Includes a conversation with director Michael Hackett and Wilde scholar David Rodes. An L.A. Theatre Works full-cast production starring: Rosalind Ayres as Herodias James Marsters as Iokanaan Andre Sogliuzzo as The Young Syrian and others Kate Steele as Salomé John Vickery as Herod Matthew Wolf as Page of Herodias and others Music by Djivan...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    A tender love story, a serpentine villainess, a glittering setting in London society and a shower of Wildean witticisms are only a few of the reasons this play has enjoyed hugely successful revivals in London and New York. This 1895 drama also seems eerily prescient, as it explores the plight of a promising young politician, desperate to hide a secret in his past. With empathy and wit, Wilde explores the pitfalls of holding public figures to higher standards than the rest of us. Includes an interview with Michael Hackett, the Chair of the Department of Theater at the University of California, Los Angeles. In addition to his extensive directorial work for L.A. Theatre Works - which...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    A House of Pomegranates is a collection of fairy tales, written by Oscar Wilde, that was published as a second collection for The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888). Wilde once said that this collection was "intended neither for the British child nor the British public." The stories included in this collection are as follows: The Young King The Birthday of the Infanta The Fisherman and his Soul The Star-Child (Summary by...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    An Ideal Husband is an 1895 comedy by Oscar Wilde which revolves around blackmail and political corruption, and touches on the themes of public and private honor. The action is set in London, in "the present", and takes place within a single day. "Sooner or later," Wilde notes, "we shall all have to pay for what we do." But he adds that, "No one should be entirely judged by their past." (Summary from...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    Lady Windermere's Fan, A Play About a Good Woman is a four-act comedy by Oscar Wilde, first produced 22 February 1892 at the St James's Theatre in London. The play was first published in 1893. Like many of Wilde's comedies, it bitingly satirizes the morals of Victorian society, particularly marriage. The story concerns Lady Windermere, who discovers that her husband may be having an affair with another woman. She confronts her husband but he instead invites the other woman, Mrs Erlynne, to his wife's birthday ball. Angered by her husband's unfaithfulness, Lady Windermere leaves her husband for another lover. Or does she? Is it really possible to trust delicious gossip? Are all men really...read more