Searching for: "Patrick Henry"

  • Patrick Henry

    On 20 March 1775, The Second Virginia Convention convened at St. John's Church in Richmond. They assembled to consider weighty matters concerning the tyranny and oppression of the Crown. Many favored continued conciliatory measures. A thirty-nine year old delegate from Hanover County named Pätrick Henry took a seat in the third pew. Here sat a man with a burden. He knew he faced "an irresolute body; that he would be opposed by the powerful, wealthy, Tory element among the members. He realized that the Loyalists were insidiously entrenched and the outcome was uncertain. Pätrick Henry's risk was tremendous - one that could easily bring him to the block." But Mr. Henry feared not...read more

  • Patrick Henry

    This speech was given March 23, 1775, at St. John's Church in Richmond, Virginia, and is credited with having singlehandedly convinced the Virginia House of Burgesses to pass a resolution delivering the Virginia troops to the Revolutionary War. In attendance were Thomas Jefferson and George Washington. Reportedly, the crowd, upon hearing the speech, jumped up and shouted, "To Arms! To Arms!" (Summary from...read more

  • Patrick Henry

    During the period of debate over the ratification of the Constitution, numerous independent local speeches and articles were published all across the country. Initially, many of the articles in opposition were written under pseudonyms, such as “Brutus”, “Centinel”, and “Federal Farmer”. Eventually, famous revolutionary figures such as Patrick Henry came out publicly against the Constitution. They argued that the strong national government proposed by the Federalists was a threat to the rights of individuals and that the President would become a king. They objected to the federal court system created by the proposed constitution. This produced a phenomenal body of political...read more

  • Patrick Henry

    The most famous speech of a brilliant American orator. Although historically targeted at the British, his impassioned words resonate against todays headlines. A classic worth owning! This speech was delivered at the Second Virginia Convention, which was being held at Richmond, Virginia. Other convention members had just given speeches urging caution and patience until the British crown replied to the Continental Congress' latest petition for reconciliation. Patrick Henry wanted to raise a militia, and put Virginia in a posture of defense (the ""Battle of Lexington and Concord"" was still a month away). This speech was his rebuttal. The ""President"" he was addressing was the Convention's...read more

  • Patrick Henry Hughes

    “I can’t see, I can’t walk, and can’t do lots of other things. With all this, people might ask “How can I bear to live?” but I don’t see it that way. Through my trials, God has given me experiences that taught me important lessons about life, which help get me through each and every day. The greatest gift I can give back to others is to share those experiences and lessons.”—Patrick Henry Hughes As featured on Extreme Makeover: Home Edition and Oprah, this is the powerful story of a young, blind musician and his courageous lessons for living with faith. Patrick Henry Hughes was born with a rare genetic disorder that left him without...read more

  • Patrick Henry

    During the period of debate over the ratification of the Constitution, numerous independent local speeches and articles were published all across the country. Initially, many of the articles in opposition were written under pseudonyms, such as "Brutus", "Centinel", and "Federal Farmer". Eventually, famous revolutionary figures such as Patrick Henry came out publicly against the Constitution. They argued that the strong national government proposed by the Federalists was a threat to the rights of individuals and that the President would become a king. They objected to the federal court system created by the proposed constitution. This produced a phenomenal body of political writing; the best...read more

  • Patrick Henry

    These infamous words closed the impassioned speech Patrick Henry delivered at the Second Virginia Convention in 1775. With this speech, he persuaded the convention to mobilize troops to defend Virginia against the British. No official transcription of Henry's address exists; biographer William Wirt compiled the most definitive version in his biography of Henry, based on the recollections of other early Americans like Thomas Jefferson. While the exact words of this historical speech may be debated forever, the sentiment behind this record rings true to Revolutionary American...read more

  • Patrick Henry

    The dissenting opinions of Patrick Henry and others who saw the Constitution as a threat to our hard-won rights and...read more

  • Patrick Henry

    'Give me liberty, or give me death!' is a quotation attributed to Patrick Henry, from his speech to the Second Virginia Convention on 23 March, 1775, at St. John's Church in Richmond, Virginia. Henry spoke without notes, and no transcript of his exact words have survived. The only known version of his speech was reconstructed in the early 1800s by William Wirt, a biographer who corresponded with various attendees of the...read more

  • Patrick Henry

    The dissenting opinions of Patrick Henry and others who saw the Constitution as a threat to our hard-won rights and...read more

  • Patrick Henry

    The Anti-Federalist Papers is the collective name given to works written by the Founding Fathers who were opposed to or concerned with the merits of the United States Constitution of 1787. Starting on 25 September 1787 (8 days after the final draft of the US Constitution) and running through the early 1790s, these anti-Federalists published a series of essays arguing against a stronger and more energetic union as embodied in the new Constitution. Although less influential than their counterparts, The Federalist Papers, these works nonetheless played an important role in shaping the early American political landscape and in the passage of the US Bill of...read more