Searching for: "Plutarch"

  • – Plutarch

    This second volume of 'Plutarch’s Lives' introduces the reader to even more important figures of the ancient world. Sertorius, Eumenes, Pompey, Alexander, Caesar and Cicero are only a small part of all the historical figures Plutarch describes. The philosopher produces character sketches of each persons, based on episodes of their lives. Thanks to Plutarch work and B. J. Harrison excellent narration, you will gain a better understanding of the ancient world and the lives of noble Greeks and Romans. B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then...read more

  • – Plutarch

    If you want to start a study of the classical world, this is the right book to begin with. Written by one of the greatest biographers of all time, 'Plutarch’s Lives' tells us the brilliant history of the ancient world. In this first volume, you will find a detailed profiles and comparisons of Romulus and Theseus, Fabius and Pericles, along with many other of the greatest figures of ancient Greece, Rome, Macedonia, Sparta, Persia and Egypt. Thanks to Plutarch work and B. J. Harrison excellent narration, you will gain a better understanding of the ancient world and the lives of noble Greeks and Romans. B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new...read more

  • Plutarch

    The ancient biographer and essayist Plutarch thought deeply about the leadership qualities of the eminent Greeks and Romans he profiled in his famous-and massive-Lives, including politicians and generals such as Pericles, Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar, and Mark Antony. Luckily for us, Plutarch distilled what he learned about wise leadership in a handful of essays, which are filled with essential lessons for experienced and aspiring leaders in any field today. In 'To an Uneducated Leader,' 'How to Be a Good Leader,' and 'Should an Old Man Engage in Politics?' Plutarch explains the characteristics of successful leaders, from being guided by reason and exercising self-control to being...read more

  • Plutarch

    Written at the beginning of the second century, Plutarch's collection of accounts of the lives of noble Grecians is a brilliant social history of the ancient world by one of the greatest biographers and moralists of all time. Still inspiration after 19 centuries, Plutarch's "Livesoffers a unique insight into the characters as well as the achievements of men who influenced their age and the empires that their culture dominated. As accessible now as when first written, Naxos AudioBooks' premiere recording of these selections from Plutarch's "Liveswill be a welcomed addition to our catalog of classic...read more

  • Plutarch

    Though he was Greek, Plutarch wrote his Lives in the first century, a world dominated by the Roman Empire. Plutarch's series of biographies was the first of its kind, as much groundbreaking in conception as the Histories of Herodotus. Plutarch looked at the great men in the Ancient World and told their stories, in many cases drawing on sources which are no longer available to us. They offer a unique insight into the characters as well as the achievements of men who influenced their age and the empires that their culture dominated. Here he considers some of the major figures that had left their stamp on the history of Rome, including generals, rulers, philosophers and politicians. It is the...read more

  • Plutarch

    Plutarch (circa A.D.45-A.D.130) traveled in Greece and Egypt, served as a diplomat in Rome, and wrote this collection of biographical portraits of 46 Greeks and Romans. This audio edition contains accounts of the lives of four of these legendary figures: Mark Antony, Cicero, Theseus, and...read more

  • Plutarch

    Pompey, Caesar, Cicero, Brutus, Antony: the names resonate across thousands of years. Major figures in the civil wars that brutally ended the Roman republic, their lives still haunt us as examples of how the hunger for personal power can overwhelm collective politics, how the exaltation of the military can corrode civilian authority, and how the best intentions can lead to disastrous consequences. Plutarch renders these history-making lives as flesh-and-blood characters, often by deftly marshaling small details such as the care Brutus exercised in his use of money or the disdain Caesar felt for the lofty eloquence of Cicero. Plutarch was a Greek intellectual who lived roughly one hundred...read more

  • Plutarch

    The story of Romulus is perhaps the most noteworthy entry in Plutarch's Parallel Lives. According to legend, Romulus and his brother Remus founded Rome after being raised by a "she-wolf," though Plutarch notes that this word was also used to describe sexually immoral women. "The Life of Romulus" shows how it is impossible to separate the man from the myth. For this reason, Plutarch's portrait of Romulus argues that legends often have as great an influence on culture as the...read more

  • Plutarch

    The Greeks glorified Theseus as the historical founder of Athens. Plutarch's record of his life incorporates all known facts and legends about him, from his defeat of the minotaur to his actions as a political leader. As this work comes from Plutarch's Parallel Lives, he draws many parallels between Theseus and his Roman counterpart, Romulus. Plutarch's "The Life of Theseus" is a must-read for mythology buffs and anyone with an interest in Greek history and...read more

  • Plutarch

    Not many of the people featured in Plutarch's Parallel Lives series are honored with nicknames, but to his fellow Athenians, Aristides was known as "The Just". A Grecian statesman, The Life of Aristides details the political rise of the man from the well-to-do family. From his career as Stratego, to his many statesman positions, his life ended in a mystery that is seemingly unbefitting the tale that Plutarch wove for him. Where or how he died, none know - but to Plutarch, his death mattered little next to his...read more

  • Plutarch

    One of the world’s most profoundly influential literary works and the basis for Shakespeare’s Roman plays (Julius Caesar, Coriolanus, and Antony and Cleopatra), Plutarch’s Lives have been entertaining and arousing the spirit of emulation in countless readers since their creation at the beginning of the second century. Originally named Parallel Lives, the work pairs eminent Romans with famous Greek counterparts—like the orators Cicero and Demosthenes—giving illuminating treatments of each separately and then comparing the two in a pithy essay. The first of the two volumes in this translation by John Dryden presents Theseus and Romulus, Pericles and Fabius,...read more

  • Plutarch

    One of the world’s most profoundly influential literary works and the basis for Shakespeare’s Roman plays (Julius Caesar, Coriolanus, and Antony and Cleopatra), Plutarch’s Lives have been entertaining and arousing the spirit of emulation in countless readers since their creation at the beginning of the second century. Originally named Parallel Lives, the work pairs eminent Romans with famous Greek counterparts—like the orators Cicero and Demosthenes—giving illuminating treatments of each separately and then comparing the two in a pithy essay. This second and final volume includes Alexander and Caesar, Demetrius and Antony, Dion and Marcus Brutus, the...read more

  • Plutarch

    In "The Life of Cicero," Plutarch details the priceless contributions Cicero made to Roman society. He translated the works of Greek philosophers into Latin, gained acclaim as an orator and lawyer, and was elected to office. Politics ultimately got the better of him, however, and his life ended in assassination while in exile. Cicero's ideas live on through his body of work, but to learn about the man himself, Plutarch's biography is an excellent starting...read more

  • Plutarch

    Mark Antony's personal life was almost as storied as his immensely successful political career. In Plutarch's biography, the most striking sections revolve around Antony's relationship with Cleopatra. Plutarch's characterization inspired Shakespeare, whose play Antony and Cleopatra would not be the same without its influence. With such close ties to Shakespeare, it's no wonder that the "The Life of Antony" holds great literary merit all its...read more

  • Plutarch

    Plutarch wrote all the biographies in Parallel Lives with a certain flair for valuing characterization over strict historical documentation. "The Life of Brutus" was no exception. By painting a complex portrait of the man behind Julius Caesar's assassination, Plutarch provided Shakespeare with the dramatic character sketch he needed to write the play Julius Caesar. For fans of Classics, this literary masterpiece is not one to...read more

  • Plutarch

    In this biography, Plutarch recounts the radical events that took place in Roman history from AD 68-69. After Nero committed suicide, the Roman Empire entered a civil war with Galba taking immediate power. He ruled for seven turbulent months before being assassinated. Plutarch's "The Life of Galba" is an essential text for understanding this shocking era of Roman...read more

  • Plutarch

    In this entry of Parallel Lives, Plutarch tells the true story of Lysander, the great Spartan leader. Lysander led a fleet of Spartan ships to victory against the Athenians in the battle at Aegospotami. History also credits him with forcing the Greeks to surrender at the end of the Peloponnesian War. With this biography, Plutarch combines Lysander's accomplishments with fascinating details about his character,creating a full portrait of the man behind the...read more

  • Plutarch

    Julius Caesar peaked as one of the most powerful generals in Roman history. In “The Life of Caesar,” Plutarch attempts to capture the greatness of this man on paper. With stirring prose, he documents Caesar’s military might and rousing spirit. The biography ends with the details of Caesar’s assassination, but Plutarch’s assures readers that the murderers eventually paid for the...read more

  • Plutarch

    The Life of Fabius Maximus is just one of the notable Roman lives detailed in Plutarch's Parallel Lives compilation. Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus is a hotly debated Roman politician and statesman. His controversial warfare tactics, as described by Plutarch, are among the many influences for worldwide Guerilla warfare that can be seen today. From his brutal army tactics to his dictatorship to his ultimate demise, Fabius Maximus lead a politically full and interesting...read more

  • Plutarch

    Conquering and blood money - without it, and without the help of Lucius Licinius Lucullus, the Roman empire would have been a lot different. Plutarch details Lucullus' intense military life, through which he finds himself the head of much of Rome's eastern territories. Surely deaths abound, but for Romans, the pillaging of other lands meant significant overhaul of public works. Said to have lost his mind in his later years, Plutarch overlooks this and says that his apparent insanity might not have been all that it...read more