Searching for: "Plutarch"

  • Plutarch

    Though he was Greek, Plutarch wrote his Lives in the first century, a world dominated by the Roman Empire. Plutarch's series of biographies was the first of its kind, as much groundbreaking in conception as the Histories of Herodotus. Plutarch looked at the great men in the Ancient World and told their stories, in many cases drawing on sources which are no longer available to us. They offer a unique insight into the characters as well as the achievements of men who influenced their age and the empires that their culture dominated. Here he considers some of the major figures that had left their stamp on the history of Rome, including generals, rulers, philosophers and politicians. It is the...read more

  • Plutarch

    Plutarch (circa A.D.45-A.D.130) traveled in Greece and Egypt, served as a diplomat in Rome, and wrote this collection of biographical portraits of 46 Greeks and Romans. This audio edition contains accounts of the lives of four of these legendary figures: Mark Antony, Cicero, Theseus, and...read more

  • Plutarch

    This epic chronicle by Plutarch (A.D. 46-120) continues with the lives of great Grecians and Romans. These biographies of the men who created the ancient world are brought to life in this new, high-quality recording. Legends such as Caesar, Alexander, Cicero, Demosthenes, and many others come alive as their politics, economy, and their individual stories play out in the time of the ancients. This translation is by John Dryden and is considered by scholars to be the quintessential...read more

  • Plutarch

    Plutarchs's (46-120 A.D.) epic chronicle of the lives of great Grecians and Romans. Beginning with the founding of Rome and Athens, the lives of the men who created the ancient world are brought to life in this new, high quality recording. Greats such as Romulus, Pericles, Theseus, Lycurgus, and many others come alive as their politics, economy, and their individual stories play out in the time of the Ancients. This translation by John Dryden, which is considered by scholars to be the quintessential...read more

  • Plutarch

    One of the world’s most profoundly influential literary works and the basis for Shakespeare’s Roman plays (Julius Caesar, Coriolanus, and Antony and Cleopatra), Plutarch’s Lives have been entertaining and arousing the spirit of emulation in countless readers since their creation at the beginning of the second century. Originally named Parallel Lives, the work pairs eminent Romans with famous Greek counterparts—like the orators Cicero and Demosthenes—giving illuminating treatments of each separately and then comparing the two in a pithy essay. This second and final volume includes Alexander and Caesar, Demetrius and Antony, Dion and Marcus Brutus, the...read more

  • Plutarch

    One of the world’s most profoundly influential literary works and the basis for Shakespeare’s Roman plays (Julius Caesar, Coriolanus, and Antony and Cleopatra), Plutarch’s Lives have been entertaining and arousing the spirit of emulation in countless readers since their creation at the beginning of the second century. Originally named Parallel Lives, the work pairs eminent Romans with famous Greek counterparts—like the orators Cicero and Demosthenes—giving illuminating treatments of each separately and then comparing the two in a pithy essay. The first of the two volumes in this translation by John Dryden presents Theseus and Romulus, Pericles and Fabius,...read more

  • Plutarch

    The Life of Timoleon, as told by Plutarch in Parallel lives, is a twisted and intriguing one. Deemed fiercely patriotic for helping plan the assassination of his tyrannical brother, Timoleon was multifaceted. He was integral in helping the citizens of Sicily, as well as his own citizens. But for the many things that he did, Timoleon suffered a lonely end – only to be celebrated further after his...read more

  • Plutarch

    In this biography, Plutarch states that Tiberius Gracchus was known more for his virtue than for his achievements. Tiberius’ virtue, and thus his legacy, lies in his actions as a reformer. Himself of plebeian leader, he sought to aid the poor by giving them some of the land belonging to wealthy landowners. These reforms shook the Roman world and led to his assassination, making Tiberius a martyr for working class people and the politicians who fight for their...read more

  • Plutarch

    The Greeks glorified Theseus as the historical founder of Athens. Plutarch’s record of his life incorporates all known facts and legends about him, from his defeat of the minotaur to his actions as a political leader. As this work comes from Plutarch’s Parallel Lives, he draws many parallels between Theseus and his Roman counterpart, Romulus. Plutarch’s “The Life of Theseus” is a must-read for mythology buffs and anyone with an interest in Greek history and...read more

  • Plutarch

    After Marathon, the Athenian government needed a new type of leader. That leader was politician and general Themistocles, whose life is well-attributed in Plutarch’s Parallel Lives. From how he handled the Persian invasion to his time in Athens after the navy, Themistocles was known as the “Glory of the Law”. Though his later life was fraught with whisperings of treason, he went on to be remembered as one of the greatest Navy leaders and Politicians that Greece...read more

  • Plutarch

    The Roman statesman Sulla had the nickname “Felix,” meaning “lucky.” Yet his accomplishments were more a matter of brute force than good fortune. He put an end to a civil war, declared himself dictator, and used his power to bring Rome back to its former value system, purging thousands of Roman enemies along the way. Plutarch’s biography of Sulla shows how one man’s use of force to obtain political power influenced many who came after him, most notably Julius...read more

  • Plutarch

    Athenian politician Solon made a name for himself as a reformer and poet. Unfortunately, little of his work survives today. Plutarch’s biography serves as a leading resource on his life, even though it was written hundreds of years after Solon’s death. In his lifetime, Solon drove political efforts to preserve Greek morality, economy, and politics, laying the groundwork for Athenian democracy as we know...read more

  • Plutarch

    The story of Romulus is perhaps the most noteworthy entry in Plutarch’s Parallel Lives. According to legend, Romulus and his brother Remus founded Rome after being raised by a “she-wolf,” though Plutarch notes that this word was also used to describe sexually immoral women. “The Life of Romulus” shows how it is impossible to separate the man from the myth. For this reason, Plutarch’s portrait of Romulus argues that legends often have as great an influence on culture as the...read more

  • Plutarch

    Born into a royal household, Pyrrhus was destined for greatness. He fought in many battles throughout his life, but his campaigns against Rome established his reputation as a commander. Many of his victories were only achieved through heavy losses, however, which is where the term “Pyrrhic victory” comes from. From this dramatic account of Pyrrhus’ life, it’s easy to see why his contemporaries considered his valor...read more

  • Plutarch

    Publius Valerius Publicola, the subject of Plutarch’s, The Life of Publicola, is one of the most influential Roman figures to be written about in the author’s Parallel Lives series. Originally from Sabine, Publicola made his life in Rome with the intent to support the unification of Rome’s people. However, when the revolution happened, he and four others drove out Lucius Tarquinius Superbus and reformed the state. His political presence only grew, and by the time of his death he was one of the most beloved Roman politicians in the...read more

  • Plutarch

    The Romans hated Pompey’s greedy father, Strabo, with a vengeance. Yet when Pompey rose in prominence, Plutarch notes that he developed the opposite character, and the Romans loved him for it. Pompey had many great accomplishments in his military and political life, but his legacy lies in forming the First Triumvirate with Crassus and Caesar. When the alliance eventually dissolved, and Pompey fled from Caesar to his death, the Roman world would never be the...read more

  • Plutarch

    Phocion is one of the many Grecian Politician’s lives detailed in Plutarch’s Parallel Lives stories. Phocion, also known as “TheGood” was known for being one of the most beloved and change-inspiring Greek politicians of his time. Elected a military stratego many times, his prowess within the army was highly regarded. His fierce opposition to many of theruling classes and his willingness to fight for what he believed in was ultimately what lead to his...read more

  • Plutarch

    The Life of Philopoemen is one of the many lives described in Plutarch’s famous Parallel Lives. Philopoemen, whose father died when he was very young, was adopted by a notable Megalopolan figurehead and studied under the local Greek philosophers. Not only was he smart, but he went on to advise and help defend Greece from Cleomenes III and the many people attempting to gain control of the powerful empire. But as Sparta began to rise in his later years, his political actions became more and more risky – which ultimately lead to his...read more

  • Plutarch

    A few days before Pericles’ birth, his mother dreamed she gave birth to a lion. Symbolically, her son grew up to be a noble, magnanimous leader who sought the best for his people. He governed primarily in the time between the Persian and Peloponnesian wars, which allowed him to focus on promoting art, literature, and culture. Athens developed its reputation as a cultural center thanks to the “Age of Pericles,” which saw the construction of its most lasting monuments, including the...read more

  • Plutarch

    Pelopidas started out a hero to the people, being born under a noble family and making a name for himself as an athlete. But as Plutarch describes in Pelopidas’s chapter of Parallel Lives, there was a lot more to this man than could be seen. Being very generous with his wealth to the less fortunate of the town, Pelopidas also went on to lead the army. By the end of his life, his patriotism did not go unnoticed – and was ultimately what led to his untimely...read more