Searching for: "Plutarch"

  • Plutarch

    Pompey, Caesar, Cicero, Brutus, Antony: the names still resonate across thousands of years. Major figures in the civil wars that brutally ended the Roman republic, their lives pose a question that haunts us still: how to safeguard a republic from the flaws of its leaders. This edition of Plutarch delivers a fresh translation of notable clarity, explanatory notes, and ample historical...read more

  • – Plutarch

    If you want to start a study of the classical world, this is the right book to begin with. Written by one of the greatest biographers of all time, 'Plutarch’s Lives' tells us the brilliant history of the ancient world. In this first volume, you will find a detailed profiles and comparisons of Romulus and Theseus, Fabius and Pericles, along with many other of the greatest figures of ancient Greece, Rome, Macedonia, Sparta, Persia and Egypt. Thanks to Plutarch work and B. J. Harrison excellent narration, you will gain a better understanding of the ancient world and the lives of noble Greeks and Romans. B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new...read more

  • – Plutarch

    This second volume of 'Plutarch’s Lives' introduces the reader to even more important figures of the ancient world. Sertorius, Eumenes, Pompey, Alexander, Caesar and Cicero are only a small part of all the historical figures Plutarch describes. The philosopher produces character sketches of each persons, based on episodes of their lives. Thanks to Plutarch work and B. J. Harrison excellent narration, you will gain a better understanding of the ancient world and the lives of noble Greeks and Romans. B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then...read more

  • Plutarch

    Written at the beginning of the second century, Plutarch's collection of accounts of the lives of noble Grecians is a brilliant social history of the ancient world by one of the greatest biographers and moralists of all time. Still inspiration after 19 centuries, Plutarch's "Livesoffers a unique insight into the characters as well as the achievements of men who influenced their age and the empires that their culture dominated. As accessible now as when first written, Naxos AudioBooks' premiere recording of these selections from Plutarch's "Liveswill be a welcomed addition to our catalog of classic...read more

  • Plutarch

    The ancient biographer and essayist Plutarch thought deeply about the leadership qualities of the eminent Greeks and Romans he profiled in his famous-and massive-Lives, including politicians and generals such as Pericles, Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar, and Mark Antony. Luckily for us, Plutarch distilled what he learned about wise leadership in a handful of essays, which are filled with essential lessons for experienced and aspiring leaders in any field today. In 'To an Uneducated Leader,' 'How to Be a Good Leader,' and 'Should an Old Man Engage in Politics?' Plutarch explains the characteristics of successful leaders, from being guided by reason and exercising self-control to being...read more

  • Plutarch

    The Life of Aemilius is one in a series of many biographies by Plutarch of notable Greek figureheads. In this biography, the Life of Aemilius details his extensive military service, then his election to office. From here, it talks about his family life – including the birth of his four children and the divorce of his wife. All of this is overshadowed by the downfall of his father in his early life, and touches on the idea of the fabled Greek tragedy being at work in the lives of the famous Greek...read more

  • Plutarch

    To understand the relationship between Athens and Sparta, Plutarch set out to examine the lives of Greece and all its former and current rivals in his Parallel Lives series. Agesilaus was one of those lives and was a notable king of Sparta prior to the Athens-Spartan war. Although he won and lost many battles for the city, his legacy lived on. He was a short-statured, lame man who managed to rule an entire city state – and many looked up to him after his...read more

  • Plutarch

    Alcibiades was a powerful man who made powerful enemies. Within a single war, his loyalties changed multiple times as he fled one enemy after another, bringing his unorthodox tactics to every strategic position he held. This charismatic, self-interested leader inspired admiration and hate in near equal measure. His complex character avoids simplification, so Plutarch skillfully portrays him as the multi-faceted man he was, leaving readers to make their own...read more

  • Plutarch

    The Life of Alexander is one of many notable Greek figure biographies written by Plutarch in his series “Parallel Lives”. Alexander is arguably one of the most notable Greek figures, immortalized in stories and legends that are commonly used in mythology classes today. With the lingering feeling of discontent after the Persian invasion and the political unrest that surrounded him, his life made for an interesting topic in Plutarch’s works. Parallel lives is often lauded as one of the most reliable references to Alexander’s life that is currently...read more

  • Plutarch

    Mark Antony’s personal life was almost as storied as his immensely successful political career. In Plutarch’s biography, the most striking sections revolve around Antony’s relationship with Cleopatra. Plutarch’s characterization inspired Shakespeare, whose play Antony and Cleopatra would not be the same without its influence. With such close ties to Shakespeare, it’s no wonder that the “The Life of Antony” holds great literary merit all its...read more

  • Plutarch

    The Life of Aratus is one of the many biographies detailed in Plutarch’s integral work, Parallel Lives. In the Life of Aratus, Plutarch details the dynamic work done by the successor of Nicocles and talks about his advocacy to turn Greece into a united country. Working as a soldier first and then a diplomat, he fought for the betterment of his fellow countrymen. Disaster hit during his later reign, as it so often did, and though many wanted him dead, the great Oracle at Delphi had other...read more

  • Plutarch

    Not many of the people featured in Plutarch’s Parallel Lives series are honored with nicknames, but to his fellow Athenians, Aristides was known as “The Just”. A Grecian statesman, The Life of Aristides details the political rise of the man from the well-to-do family. From his career as Stratego, to his many statesman positions, his life ended in a mystery that is seemingly unbefitting the tale that Plutarch wove for him. Where or how he died, none know – but to Plutarch, his death mattered little next to his...read more

  • Plutarch

    Plutarch set out to understand the lives of the political greats of his time when he wrote his famous Parallel Lives, of which The Life of Artaxerxes is included. Artaxerxes was fairly unique among the mix of famous names listed here, as he was a Persian King. His influence upon the Persian war and the remainder of Parallel Lives biographies is irrefutable. Though arguably his inclusion was merely in relation to his influence on Greece and Rome, Artaxerxes is still one of the more interesting biographies you will read in the...read more

  • Plutarch

    Plutarch wrote all the biographies in Parallel Lives with a certain flair for valuing characterization over strict historical documentation. “The Life of Brutus” was no exception. By painting a complex portrait of the man behind Julius Caesar’s assassination, Plutarch provided Shakespeare with the dramatic character sketch he needed to write the play Julius Caesar. For fans of Classics, this literary masterpiece is not one to...read more

  • Plutarch

    Julius Caesar peaked as one of the most powerful generals in Roman history. In “The Life of Caesar,” Plutarch attempts to capture the greatness of this man on paper. With stirring prose, he documents Caesar’s military might and rousing spirit. The biography ends with the details of Caesar’s assassination, but Plutarch’s assures readers that the murderers eventually paid for the...read more

  • Plutarch

    Caius Gracchus was barely a man when his older brother Tiberius was assassinated for his reforms on behalf of the poor. After this, Caius tried to live a quiet life away from the public eye, perhaps afraid of meeting the same fate. Yet in Plutarch’s biography of Caius, he recounts that Tiberius appeared to his brother in a dream, telling him that they were both destined to fight and die for the working class. Caius eventually answered the call, served in the tribune for two years, and was likewise assassinated for his...read more

  • Plutarch

    We all know the founder of Rome, but do we know much about the widely-proclaimed second founder of Rome? The monarchy, tyranny, and victorious battles of Marcus Furius Camillus, the second founder, are documented in Plutarch’s Parallel Lives. After the destruction of Veii, Camillus returned to Rome as a pompous victor and dictator, causing quite a stir when he refused to follow the wishes of the senate when it came to dealing with Veii. Sensing banishment was in his future, Camillus’s time in Rome was much less bloody than many of his...read more

  • Plutarch

    Cato the Elder rose from his Plebeian ancestry to become a great Roman senator, orator, and historian. While he was the first in his family to hold elected office, Cato proudly declared that his military roots made bravery a family trait. Plutarch praises him for his actions as a father, his strength as an orator, and his wise ethics, but he criticizes his behavior toward animals and slaves. While there are several historical biographies of what Cato did, this entry in Parallel Lives creates an intimate portrait of who Cato was in character and in...read more

  • Plutarch

    Cato the Younger was one of the many biographies documented by Plutarch in his series called Parallel Lives. Related to Cato the Elder, Cato the Younger was also a student of philosophy as well as a Roman Statesman. Afterhis father died and he gained his inheritance, Cato the Younger began his life as philosopher, warrior, and political leader. His life ended, as so many Roman lives did back then, in...read more

  • Plutarch

    In “The Life of Cicero,” Plutarch details the priceless contributions Cicero made to Roman society. He translated the works of Greek philosophers into Latin, gained acclaim as an orator and lawyer, and was elected to office. Politics ultimately got the better of him, however, and his life ended in assassination while in exile. Cicero’s ideas live on through his body of work, but to learn about the man himself, Plutarch’s biography is an excellent starting...read more