Searching for: "Scientific American"

  • Judith Horstman

    Every issue of Scientific American and Scientific American Mind has breaking news about how the brain works--and how it can stay healthy longer. Neurologists and psychologists are finding  the brain at midlife--from 40 to 65 and even beyond--is much more elastic and more supple than anyone ever realized. Far from disintegrating, healthy maturing brains fade quite slowly-- and even in old old age, continue to make new connections and bring new cognitive systems on line. Short-term memory may not be what it was, but we manage information and parse meanings in new--and often more effective-ways than we did in youth. What's more, temperament changes to suit those new skills,...read more

  • Judith Horstman

    Brave New Brain presents incredible projections into the future from the technological reality of now, including *Current wireless thought controlled proesthetic devices that allow our thoughts controlling everything from the garage door to our computer *Recently revealed brainscans that show where and how we experience emotions like love and desire that will help thought control and strategic brain manipulation that will facilitate the choice and process of finding a mate. *New neuroscientific research on how we remember, learn, make decisions, respond to conflict, win or lose competitions, and other intellectual activities that may be enhanced and redirected ...read more

  • Scientific American

    People behave in strange ways. We sometimes giggle when someone falls down, swear we've been to places we haven't or continue believing in something despite scientific evidence to the contrary. For more than a decade, Scientific American MIND's long-running feature "Ask the Brains" has addressed questions from their readers on the quirks and quandaries of human behavior, psychology, and neurology. Here, in Ask the Brains, Part 1, they've compiled some of the best and most interesting inquiries about the human...read more

  • Scientific American

    Our nearest planetary neighbor has been the subject of endless fascination and wide-ranging theories throughout history. Is there life on Mars? Was there ever life on Mars? What was the atmosphere like thousands or millions of years ago? From Percival Lowell, who built his own observatory so he could dedicate himself to studying the red planet, to NASA landing the car-sized Curiosity rover in 2012, this book traces Scientific American’s coverage of the observation and exploration of...read more

  • Scientific American

    Self-improvement is a lifelong quest. We all have things we’d like to change about ourselves, which is why many people make New Year’s resolutions. Yet, research shows that only about 8 percent of resolution-makers achieve their goals. Changing personal habits is both hugely difficult and hugely rewarding. Here, Scientific American offers this guide on breaking bad habits and the ultimate satisfaction of making difficult life...read more

  • Scientific American

    The editors of Scientific American's bestselling Fact or Fiction: Science Tackles 58 Popular Myths return with Fact or Fiction 2: 50 (More) Popular Myths Explained. In it, we cast an analytical eye on another collection of urban lore and cultural myths that persist so long in our collective consciousness they acquire a ring of truth. Who hasn't heard the "five-second rule," which insists that food dropped on the floor is safe to eat if it's picked up within five seconds? How many of us have been told by well-meaning relatives or friends to "feed a cold, starve a fever?" Each article explores whether science can back up these and forty-eight other long-standing claims on a variety of...read more

  • Scientific American

    Did NASA really spend millions creating a pen that would write in space? Is chocolate poisonous to dogs? Does stress cause gray hair? These questions are a sample of the urban lore investigated in this audiobook, Fact or Fiction: Science Tackles 58 Popular Myths. Drawing from Scientific American's "Fact or Fiction" and "Strange But True" columns, we've selected fifty-eight of the most surprising, fascinating, useful, and just plain wacky topics confronted by our writers over the...read more

  • Scientific American

    For going on two decades, Scientific American's "Ask the Experts" column has been answering reader questions on all fields of science. We've taken your questions from the basic to the esoteric and reached out to top scientists, professors, and researchers to find out why the sky is blue or whether we really only use 10 percent of our brains. Now, we've combed through our archives and have compiled some of the most interesting questions (and answers) into a series of books. Organized by subject, each title provides short, easily digestible answers to questions on that particular branch of the sciences. The Human Body and Mind is the third book in this series, and it tackles questions...read more

  • Scientific American

    For going on two decades, Scientific American's "Ask the Experts" column has been answering reader questions on all fields of science. We've taken your questions from the basic to the esoteric and reached out to top scientists, professors, and researchers to find out why the sky is blue or whether we really only use 10 percent of our brains. Now, we've combed through our archives and have compiled some of the most interesting questions (and answers) into a series of books. Organized by subject, each title provides short, easily digestible answers to questions on that particular branch of the sciences. The second title in our series-Astronomy-looks skyward and explains a variety of...read more

  • Scientific American

    Autism is one of three diagnoses that the DSM-5 includes in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). While our understanding of this condition has grown exponentially, research has been fraught with controversy. Autism appears to be on the rise, depending on how you define it, and its causes more complex than imagined. In Understanding Autism, Scientific American's editors have gathered the most current information on autism, including how it's diagnosed, risk factors, treatments, and...read more

  • Scientific American

    On June 5, 1981, the scientific community received a wake-up call from the CDC in the form of a terrible new illness that the world would soon know as AIDS. Three decades later, remarkable progress has been made, but much more remains to be understood and to be done. In this audiobook, we explore where the disease came from, how it works, how it spreads, the search for a vaccine, and cultural and sociological...read more

  • Scientific American

    People say that they trust scientists, yet evidence often takes a back seat to emotions. In fact, for issues that cause the loudest public furor-like vaccine safety-there is almost no debate in the scientific community. This audiobook examines the science behind today's most contentious debates-including gun control, GMOs, and evolution, as well as strategies for understanding and coping with...read more

  • Scientific American

    The science of education is elusive. Educators, academics, and scientists have struggled with issues like how to make learning approachable yet challenging, what to include in the curriculum and when, what the optimal class size is, and so on. In this collection, we explore the many ways that learning is also a scientific process and offer the latest theories of teaching and...read more

  • Scientific American

    One of the biggest discoveries in physics, the quest for the Higgs boson demonstrates the value of a good theory. In July 2012, a Higgs-like particle was found near the energies scientists predicted. Now, armed with better evidence and better questions, the scientific process continues. In this audiobook, we've gathered our best reporting to explain that process-the theories, the search, the discovery, and the ongoing...read more

  • Scientific American

    The extreme drought in the US Southwest has brought the issues of water use and management to the forefront of media attention. Historically, arguments over water rights have plagued this area since the days of John Wesley Powell, and disputes mark the relations between states, city-dwellers, farmers, and environmentalists to this day. Add to that the challenges of climate change, which is altering rainfall patterns the world over, and the imperative to rethink water management policies becomes acute. Battling Drought takes a long look at the situation in the American Southwest from the early engineering projects, such as building the Hoover and Grand Coulee dams, which were designed to...read more

  • Scientific American

    How did life begin on Earth? Does it exist elsewhere? What would those life forms be like? These fundamental questions about the nature of life and our own cosmic significance are endlessly fascinating. In this book, we present several theories on the origin of life, some of its extreme and surprising forms, and the ongoing search for signs—or sentience—on distant...read more

  • Scientific American

    The past few years have seen tremendous strides in our understanding of cancer, including new hypotheses about its genetic origins and new treatment alternatives using the body’s own immune response. In The Science of Cancer, we examine what we know and what we’re finding out about this scourge of humankind. We delve into the molecular basis and complex causes of cancer, the arguments for and against screenings, minimizing risk, and several new and targeted therapies, including homing in on stem cells, making use of viruses, and making use of vaccines to jump-start the immune...read more

  • Scientific American

    “Cosmos” comes from a Greek word for an orderly and systematic universe. In this book, we present the most riveting discoveries and mind-bending ideas about our cosmic home, from what we know of the origins of the universe and the cartography of space to the most bizarre phenomena and the search for life. Discussions include the possibility that the big bang was the consequence of a black hole in a fourth spatial dimension, that cosmic ripples created infinite universes, that entangled black holes could act as wormhole-like passageways through space, and much...read more

  • Scientific American

    The fundamental outlines of the physical world, from its tiniest particles to massive galaxy clusters, have been apparent for decades. Does this mean physicists are about to tie it all up into a neat package? Not at all. Just when you think you’re figuring it out, the universe begins to look its strangest, and this audiobook illustrates how answers often lead to more questions and open up new paths to...read more

  • Scientific American

    Every day hundreds of millions of people go to work. Hours upon hours are spent at desks, in offices, in meetings, and speaking to and collaborating with colleagues. But how many of those hours are productive ones? How can we make the most of those hours and become more successful? Many factors—personal, professional, and psychological—combine to affect how we think, feel, and act while on the job, which ultimately affects our productivity and success. In 9 to 5: Your Mind at Work, we look at some of these factors, including the physical office space, how to foster creativity and communication, the psychology of effective leadership, the benefits and importance of diversity, and...read more