Searching for: "Stanley Weintraub"

  • Stanley Weintraub

    In the early months of World War I, on Christmas Eve, men on both sides of the trenches laid down their arms and joined in a spontaneous celebration. Despite orders to continue shooting, the unofficial truce spread across the front lines. Even the participants found what they were doing incredible: Germans placed candlelit Christmas trees on trench parapets, warring soldiers sang carols, and men on both sides shared food parcels from home. They climbed from the trenches to meet in 'No Man's Land' where they buried the dead, exchanged gifts, ate and drank together, and even played soccer. Throughout his narrative, Stanley Weintraub uses the stories of the men who were there, as well as...read more

  • Stanley Weintraub

    From an acclaimed historian comes the dramatic story of theChristmas escape of thousands of American troops overwhelmingly surrounded bythe enemy in Korea's harsh terrain. Just before Thanksgiving in 1950, five months into theKorean War, General MacArthur flew to American positions in the north andgrandly announced an "end-the-war-by-Christmas" offensive despite recentintervention by Mao's Chinese, who would soon trap tens of thousands of UStroops poised toward the Yalu River border. Led by marines, an overwhelmed Tenth Corps evacuated the frigid, mountainous Chosin Reservoir fastness and fought aswarming enemy and treacherous snow and ice to reach the coast. Weather,terrain, Chinese...read more

  • Stanley Weintraub

    When the 1944 presidential election campaign geared up late that spring, Franklin D. Roosevelt had already been in office longer than any other president. Sensing likely weakness, the Republicans mounted an energetic and expensive campaign, hitting hard at FDR's liberal domestic policies and the ongoing cost of World War II. Despite gravely deteriorating health, FDR and his feisty running mate, the unexpected Harry Truman, campaigned vigorously against young governor Thomas E. Dewey of New York and old-line Ohio governor John Bricker. Roosevelt's charm and wit, as well as the military successes in Europe and the Pacific, contributed to his sweeping electoral victory. But the hard-fought...read more

  • Stanley Weintraub

    In Young Mr.Roosevelt Stanley Weintraub evokes Franklin Delano Roosevelt's politicaland wartime beginnings. An unpromising patrician playboy appointed assistantsecretary of the Navy in 1913, Roosevelt learned quickly and rose to nationalvisibility during World War I. Democratic vice-presidential nominee in 1920, helost the election but not his ambitions. While his stature was rising, histesty marriage to his cousin Eleanor was fraying amid scandal quietly coveredup. Even polio a year later would not suppress the ever indomitable Roosevelt and his inevitableascent. Against the backdropof a reluctant America's entry into a world war and FDR's hawkish build-up of amodern navy, Washington's...read more

  • Stanley Weintraub

    11 Days in December tells the dramatic story of one of the grimmest points of World War II and its Christmas Eve turn toward victory. In December 1944, the Allied forces thought their campaign for securing Europe was in its final stages. But Germany had one last great surprise attack still planned, leading to some of the most intense fighting in World War II: the Battle of the Bulge. After ten days of horrific weather conditions and warfare, General Patton famously asked God, "Sir, whose side are you on?" For the next four days, as the skies cleared, the Allies could fly again, the Nazis were contained, and the outcome of the war was ensured. Renowned historian and author Stanley...read more

  • Stanley Weintraub

    General Sherman's Christmas opens on Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, November 24, 1864, one month before Christmas. Sherman was relentlessly pushing his troops across Georgia, reaching Savannah days before Christmas. His methodical encroachment of the city from all sides eventually convinced Confederate general W. J. Hardee to slip away in darkness across an improvised causeway toward South Carolina to the north. In freezing rain and terrifying fog, soldiers with their equipment crossed an improvised pontoon bridge across the mile-wide Savannah River. Three days before Christmas, the mayor, Richard Arnold, surrendered the city, populated now mostly by women and children and slaves who had not...read more

  • Stanley Weintraub

    This biography of Victoria highlights the many dramas of her life. For example, she was fatherless at eight months and treated poorly by her family, but survived to become the only English queen comparable to Elizabeth I. The character of Victoria herself, stubborn and vital, is also drawn...read more

  • Stanley Weintraub

    Christmas 1941 came little more than two weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The shock—in some cases overseas, elation—was worldwide. While Americans attempted to go about celebrating as usual, the reality of the just-declared war was on everybody’s mind. United States troops on Wake Island were battling a Japanese landing force and, in the Philippines, losing the fight to save Luzon. In Japan, the Pearl Harbor strike force returned to Hiroshima Bay and toasted its sweeping success. Across the Atlantic, much of Europe was frozen under grim Nazi occupation. Just three days before Christmas, Churchill surprised Roosevelt with an unprecedented trip to Washington, where...read more