Searching for: "Stephen Crane, Stephen Crane"

  • Jack London

    This collection features a selection of classic short stories and poems by legendary Western authors Stephen Crane, Bret Harte, and Jack London. Stephen Crane "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky" read by William Windom "The Black Riders" (poem) read by Stefan Rudnicki "The Five White Mice" read by Arte Johnson "The Blue Hotel" read by Stefan Rudnicki "His New Mittens" read by Robert Forster "A Newspaper..." (poem) read by Stefan Rudnicki "The Little Regiment" read by Stephen Hoye Bret Harte "The Outcasts of Poker Flat" read by William Windom "Mary's Album" (poem) read by Stefan Rudnicki "Brown of Calaveras" read by Stephen Hoye "The Society upon the Stanislaw" (poem) read by...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    In 1894, when Stephen Crane was just twenty-two years old, he showed his friend, Hamlin Garland, a set of poems in manuscript. Garland showed them to John D. Barry, who arranged for a public reading of the new work. Crane could not summon up the courage to read the poems, or even attend the reading; he waited outside on the street while Barry read them. The publishing firm of Copeland and Day took on the work, and Stephen Crane was a published poet. Six months later, The Red Badge of Courage appeared, and Stephen Crane's literary career was on its way. He still didn't have enough money to live on, but his work had reached the public. Just six years later, he was dead of...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    A Dark Brown Dog: A Stephen Crane Story "A Dark Brown Dog" is an unexpected Stephen Crane jewel. Crane is best known for three short stories, "The Open Boat", thought by many to be the best short story ever written; "The Blue Hotel"; and "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky". Simply has recorded over 10 more stories that deserve to be right up there with the top three. As Simply says, this is not an NFL Power ranking, or a compare and contrast assignment. This is your opportunity to enjoy many of Crane's other illuminating and moving works. "A Dark Brown Dog" is the first cousin of Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, in being set in the rough, tough world of the New York Bowery of the late 19th...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    A Great Mistake, which is quite short, is an unexpected Stephen Crane jewel. Crane is best known for three short stories, "The Open Boat", thought by many to be the best short story ever written, "The Blue Hotel", and "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky". Simply has recorded over ten more stories that deserve to be right up there with the top three. As Simply says, this is not an NFL Power ranking, or a compare and contrast assignment. This is your opportunity to enjoy many of Crane's other illuminating and moving works." A Great Mistake" relates to a common theme of coveting something out of reach, in this case on fruit cart, when fruit was a far more expensive and unobtainable product than...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    An Episode of War, which is quite short, is an unexpected Stephen Crane jewel. Crane is best known for three short stories, "The Open Boat, thought by many to be the best short story ever written, "The Blue Hotel", and "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky". "An Episode of War" is perhaps the best known of the other ten Crane stories Simply recorded. It deserves to be right up there with the top three. As Simply says, this is not an NFL Power ranking, or a compare and contrast assignment. This is your opportunity to enjoy many of Crane's other illuminating and moving works. An Episode of War captures the randomness, futility, and danger of wartime as the Lieutenant is wounded while dividing up...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    An Ominous Baby, which is quite short, is an unexpected Stephen Crane jewel. Crane is best known for three short stories, "The Open Boat", thought by many to be the best short story ever written, "The Blue Hotel", and "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky". "An Ominous Baby" is perhaps the most unusual of the other ten Crane stories Simply recorded. It deserves to be right up there with the top three. As Simply says, this is not an NFL Power ranking, or a compare and contrast assignment. This is your opportunity to enjoy many of Crane's other illuminating and moving works. The story is mythic with as "A baby was wandering in a strange country" and meets up with another. The first is tough guy type...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Stephen Crane was an American novelist, poet and journalist. Crane is noted for his early employment of naturalism, a literary style in which characters face realistically portrayed and often bleak circumstances, but Crane added impressionistic imagery and biblical symbolism to the austere realism. Here are two of his most famous stories, The Open Boat and An Episode of...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    The Red Badge of Courage was published in 1895, when its author, an impoverished writer living a bohemian life in New York, was only twenty-three. It immediately became a bestseller, and Stephen Crane became famous. Crane set out to create "a psychological portrayal of fear." Henry Fleming, a Union Army volunteer in the Civil War, thinks "that perhaps in a battle he might run....As far as war was concerned he knew nothing of himself." And he does run in his first battle, full of fear and then remorse. He encounters a grotesquely rotting corpse propped against a tree, and a column of wounded men, one of whom is a friend who dies horribly in front of him. Fleming receives his own "red badge"...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    George's Mother George's Mother is a moving story about a mother, the little old woman, and her son, George. They are in the same tenement as the Johnsons of Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, but have a much dearer relationship. George's Mother is at the center of it all as a warm loving mother, worried about her son. When George hears his mother is sick, he comes home immediately despite looking uncool to his rowdy friends, and soothes his mother. He shows his deep caring for her which moves her as well. Critics have spoken about George's being a drunk, an alcoholic, and the like. But that is not core to the story because George keeps his job for a long time; when he loses it, much of...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Stephen Crane's second book of poetry followed up the success of his first book, Black Riders. His search for love, his lonely, bitter struggle to make his peace with God, the war in his heart between cynicism and an unshakeable longing for truth and beauty in the world - these all continue in his second book. Sadly, this second book was also his last, for he died tragically young. A Freshwater Seas...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Maggie: A Girl of the Streets Maggie: A Girl of the Streets is a ground breaking novel relating to the precarious state of women in the new industrial world at the end of the nineteenth century. One blemish on a reputation and a woman would often be banned from her house, subject to earning her living on the streets, and often dying young as Maggie does. The irony is that Maggie has two abusive parents, the father who dies early in the novel, and the mother who hurls her out, with much fussing and lamenting about "all she has done" for Maggie. Crane's irony builds from the beginning through Maggie's brother, who is upset his friend debauched Maggie and got her pregnant. The turning...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Henry Fleming had no idea how horrible war really was. Attacks come from all sides, bullets fly, bombs crash. Men everywhere are wounded, bleeding, and dying. Now, Henry's fighting for his life and he's scared. He must make a decision, perhaps the most difficult decision he will ever make in his life: save himself, run from the enemy and desert his friends, or fight, be brave, and risk his life. If he stays to fight, he may die with his regiment. If he runs, he'll have to live with knowing he was a coward. Can Henry find the strength within himself to earn his red badge of...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    An Experiment in Luxury is the book end of all this as a young man visits his rich friend and his millionaire family. It is a conventional scene in which the young man's friend, son of the household, encourages him to speak only conventionally to his mother or he will get on her bad side. We see her preoccupied with her worries and the husband/millionaire taking his mind off of it all by playing with a kitten. They have their dinners, along with arguments between the friend and his sisters, providing some entertainment at the table, and the story grinds to an end. This is best listened to along with its book end, An Experiment in Luxury, to get the full force of it...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    An Experiment in Misery in a story similar to "The Men in the Storm" except that it focuses on one character, and a new fellow traveler called the Assassin, who struggle for warmth and a place for the night. The main character stops first at a saloon for free soup with a beer, where he meets the Assassin. The Assassin accosts the man seeking a few cents for a room. They join forces with the Assassin identifying the place cheap enough for the other man to stay in, and the man gives him the few cents he needs for the room. The next morning the man fronts him a few cents for breakfast and they have it together. They go to a park bench to wait while others work. They get ready in their...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    His New Mittens An interesting story about how a boy goes to school with new mittens his mother wants him to protect. To do so he cannot join in a snowball fight with his friends with parents less scrupulous about clothing and the like. The boy ultimately gives in, gets in trouble with his mother, is made to eat alone, attempts to run away much but only makes it to their cold shed. He then gathers his forces to leave for California, where ever that might be. He gets to the street, trudges up in one direction, and see the butcher's shop. Here is a Winesburg, Ohio moment, when the boy enters the store, he is lucky that the store owner, having been a boy himself, sees something is wrong....read more

  • Stephen Crane

    At the time he wrote The Red Badge of Courage, Stephen Crane had never witnessed a battle. Crane's older brother fought in the Battle of Chancellorsville, however, and Crane listened carefully to his brother's reminiscences. The result is the classic Civil War novel, and one of the greatest stories of all time. Henry Fleming was always playing soldier at home on the farm. Now, on the battlefield, shells burst in front of him like strange flowers, gunfire rips toward him in great crackling sheets of flame, and all around him, blue-coated figures lie still on the blood-drenched grass. The Battle of Chancellorsville has begun. Stephen Crane's most famous work stands alone as the testimony of a...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Originally published pseudonymously in 1893, Maggie: A Girl of the Streets follows the tragic tale of Maggie and her life in the harsh streets and tenements of the New York City Bowery district. Initially rejected by publishers for being viewed as too brutal and accurate in its descriptions of poverty and female sexuality, Stephen Crane published the work at his own expense. Following the success of Crane's novel The Red Badge of Courage, this novel was reissued in 1896 with extensive rewrites and edits. Generally considered to be the first work of American Naturalism, Crane combines exhaustive research and an attention to detail to create an accurate depiction of life for the working poor...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Commonly considered Stephen Crane's greatest accomplishment, The Red Badge of Courage ranks among the foremost literary achievements of the modern era. It is the story of Private Henry Fleming who goes into the Civil War, a hot-headed young patriot with his mind brimful of ideas of glory. Stephen Crane was born in 1871 in New Jersey and attended Lafayette College and Syracuse University. He never completed his education but moved to New York and reported for the Herald and Tribune. At the age of twenty-four, never having experienced war himself, Crane wrote The Red Badge Of Courage which made him a huge success. Because of this, he was pushed into war reporting for most of his life....read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Following its initial appearance in serial form, Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage was published as a complete work in 1895 and quickly became the benchmark for modern anti-war literature. In Henry Flemming, Stephen Crane creates a great and realistic study of the mind of an inexperienced soldier trapped in the fury and turmoil of war. Flemming dashes into battle, at first tormented by fear, then bolstered with courage in time for the final confrontation. Although the exact battle is never identified, Crane based this story of a soldier’s experiences during the American Civil War on the 1863 Battle of Chancellorsville. Many veterans, both Union and Confederate, praised...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Stephen Crane (1871-1900) was a prolific American poet, novelist and short story writer. He is recognised by modern critics as one of the most innovative writers of his generation. 'The Open Boat' is probably Stephen Crane's best known and most admired story. It tells the adventure of four sailors, the captain, the oiler, the cook and the correspondent, who are sole survivors of a shipwreck at sea in a small rowing boat off the coast of Florida. The camaraderie of the four, juxtaposed against the individual struggles which each has with his own mortality and the complete indifference in which the universe holds their fate, creates an atmosphere and dramatic tension as they face their last...read more