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  • Stephen Crane

    La gran novela sobre la Guerra de Secesión de Estados Unidos. Traducción de Juan Aparicio Belmonte y María Ermitas Barrasa. Introducción de Gary Scharnhorst, catedrático honorífico de la Universidad de Nuevo México En esta novela vertiginosa que Stephen Crane completó con solo veinticuatro años de edad, un joven se alista como voluntario en la Guerra de Secesión movido por sus ideales de heroísmo. Sin embargo, la batalla pronto deja de ser un escenario romántico para convertirse en un infierno de miedo, fango y desesperación, cuya descripción impresionista Crane conjuga magistralmente con las dudas individuales. Muchos son los estudios que recalcan la...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    In 1894, when Stephen Crane was just twenty-two years old, he showed his friend, Hamlin Garland, a set of poems in manuscript. Garland showed them to John D. Barry, who arranged for a public reading of the new work. Crane could not summon up the courage to read the poems, or even attend the reading; he waited outside on the street while Barry read them. The publishing firm of Copeland and Day took on the work, and Stephen Crane was a published poet. Six months later, The Red Badge of Courage appeared, and Stephen Crane's literary career was on its way. He still didn't have enough money to live on, but his work had reached the public. Just six years later, he was dead of...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    A Dark Brown Dog: A Stephen Crane Story "A Dark Brown Dog" is an unexpected Stephen Crane jewel. Crane is best known for three short stories, "The Open Boat", thought by many to be the best short story ever written; "The Blue Hotel"; and "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky". Simply has recorded over 10 more stories that deserve to be right up there with the top three. As Simply says, this is not an NFL Power ranking, or a compare and contrast assignment. This is your opportunity to enjoy many of Crane's other illuminating and moving works. "A Dark Brown Dog" is the first cousin of Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, in being set in the rough, tough world of the New York Bowery of the late 19th...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    An Ominous Baby, which is quite short, is an unexpected Stephen Crane jewel. Crane is best known for three short stories, "The Open Boat", thought by many to be the best short story ever written, "The Blue Hotel", and "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky". "An Ominous Baby" is perhaps the most unusual of the other ten Crane stories Simply recorded. It deserves to be right up there with the top three. As Simply says, this is not an NFL Power ranking, or a compare and contrast assignment. This is your opportunity to enjoy many of Crane's other illuminating and moving works. The story is mythic with as "A baby was wandering in a strange country" and meets up with another. The first is tough guy type...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    A Great Mistake, which is quite short, is an unexpected Stephen Crane jewel. Crane is best known for three short stories, "The Open Boat", thought by many to be the best short story ever written, "The Blue Hotel", and "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky". Simply has recorded over ten more stories that deserve to be right up there with the top three. As Simply says, this is not an NFL Power ranking, or a compare and contrast assignment. This is your opportunity to enjoy many of Crane's other illuminating and moving works." A Great Mistake" relates to a common theme of coveting something out of reach, in this case on fruit cart, when fruit was a far more expensive and unobtainable product than...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    An Episode of War, which is quite short, is an unexpected Stephen Crane jewel. Crane is best known for three short stories, "The Open Boat, thought by many to be the best short story ever written, "The Blue Hotel", and "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky". "An Episode of War" is perhaps the best known of the other ten Crane stories Simply recorded. It deserves to be right up there with the top three. As Simply says, this is not an NFL Power ranking, or a compare and contrast assignment. This is your opportunity to enjoy many of Crane's other illuminating and moving works. An Episode of War captures the randomness, futility, and danger of wartime as the Lieutenant is wounded while dividing up...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Stephen Crane was born 1st November, 1871 in Newark, New Jersey and was the eighth surviving child out of fourteen. Incredibly he began writing at the age of four and was published several times by the age of sixteen. Crane only began a full-time education when he was nine but quickly mastered the grades needed to catch up and move forward. Although educated at Lafayette and Syracuse he had little interest in completing university and was keener to move on to a career, declaring college to be 'a waste of time'. By twenty he was a reporter and two years later had published his debut novel 'Maggie: A Girl of the Streets'. In literary circles this was hailed as the first work of American...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Stephen Crane was born 1st November, 1871 in Newark, New Jersey and was the eighth surviving child out of fourteen. Incredibly he began writing at the age of four and was published several times by the age of sixteen. Crane only began a full-time education when he was nine but quickly mastered the grades needed to catch up and move forward. Although educated at Lafayette and Syracuse he had little interest in completing university and was keener to move on to a career, declaring college to be 'a waste of time'. By twenty he was a reporter and two years later had published his debut novel 'Maggie: A Girl of the Streets'. In literary circles this was hailed as the first work of American...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Stephen Crane was an American novelist, poet and journalist. Crane is noted for his early employment of naturalism, a literary style in which characters face realistically portrayed and often bleak circumstances, but Crane added impressionistic imagery and biblical symbolism to the austere realism. Here are two of his most famous stories, The Open Boat and An Episode of...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    The Red Badge of Courage was published in 1895, when its author, an impoverished writer living a bohemian life in New York, was only twenty-three. It immediately became a bestseller, and Stephen Crane became famous. Crane set out to create "a psychological portrayal of fear." Henry Fleming, a Union Army volunteer in the Civil War, thinks "that perhaps in a battle he might run....As far as war was concerned he knew nothing of himself." And he does run in his first battle, full of fear and then remorse. He encounters a grotesquely rotting corpse propped against a tree, and a column of wounded men, one of whom is a friend who dies horribly in front of him. Fleming receives his own "red badge"...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    George's Mother George's Mother is a moving story about a mother, the little old woman, and her son, George. They are in the same tenement as the Johnsons of Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, but have a much dearer relationship. George's Mother is at the center of it all as a warm loving mother, worried about her son. When George hears his mother is sick, he comes home immediately despite looking uncool to his rowdy friends, and soothes his mother. He shows his deep caring for her which moves her as well. Critics have spoken about George's being a drunk, an alcoholic, and the like. But that is not core to the story because George keeps his job for a long time; when he loses it, much of...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Stephen Crane's second book of poetry followed up the success of his first book, Black Riders. His search for love, his lonely, bitter struggle to make his peace with God, the war in his heart between cynicism and an unshakeable longing for truth and beauty in the world - these all continue in his second book. Sadly, this second book was also his last, for he died tragically young. A Freshwater Seas...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Maggie: A Girl of the Streets Maggie: A Girl of the Streets is a ground breaking novel relating to the precarious state of women in the new industrial world at the end of the nineteenth century. One blemish on a reputation and a woman would often be banned from her house, subject to earning her living on the streets, and often dying young as Maggie does. The irony is that Maggie has two abusive parents, the father who dies early in the novel, and the mother who hurls her out, with much fussing and lamenting about "all she has done" for Maggie. Crane's irony builds from the beginning through Maggie's brother, who is upset his friend debauched Maggie and got her pregnant. The turning...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    At the time he wrote The Red Badge of Courage, Stephen Crane had never witnessed a battle. Crane's older brother fought in the Battle of Chancellorsville, however, and Crane listened carefully to his brother's reminiscences. The result is the classic Civil War novel, and one of the greatest stories of all time. Henry Fleming was always playing soldier at home on the farm. Now, on the battlefield, shells burst in front of him like strange flowers, gunfire rips toward him in great crackling sheets of flame, and all around him, blue-coated figures lie still on the blood-drenched grass. The Battle of Chancellorsville has begun. Stephen Crane's most famous work stands alone as the testimony of a...read more

  • Jack London

    This collection features a selection of classic short stories and poems by legendary Western authors Stephen Crane, Bret Harte, and Jack London. Stephen Crane “The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky” read by William Windom“The Black Riders” (poem) read by Stefan Rudnicki“The Five White Mice” read by Arte Johnson“The Blue Hotel” read by Stefan Rudnicki“His New Mittens” read by Robert Forster“A Newspaper…” (poem) read by Stefan Rudnicki“The Little Regiment” read by Stephen HoyeBret Harte “The Outcasts of Poker Flat” read by William Windom“Mary’s Album” (poem) read by Stefan Rudnicki“Brown of Calaveras” read by Stephen Hoye“The Society upon the...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Originally published pseudonymously in 1893, Maggie: A Girl of the Streets follows the tragic tale of Maggie and her life in the harsh streets and tenements of the New York City Bowery district. Initially rejected by publishers for being viewed as too brutal and accurate in its descriptions of poverty and female sexuality, Stephen Crane published the work at his own expense. Following the success of Crane’s novel The Red Badge of Courage, this novel was reissued in 1896 with extensive rewrites and edits. Generally considered to be the first work of American Naturalism, Crane combines exhaustive research and an attention to detail to create an accurate depiction of life for the working...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Commonly considered Stephen Crane's greatest accomplishment, The Red Badge of Courage ranks among the foremost literary achievements of the modern era. It is the story of Private Henry Fleming who goes into the Civil War, a hot-headed young patriot with his mind brimful of ideas of glory. Stephen Crane was born in 1871 in New Jersey and attended Lafayette College and Syracuse University. He never completed his education but moved to New York and reported for the Herald and Tribune. At the age of twenty-four, never having experienced war himself, Crane wrote The Red Badge Of Courage which made him a huge success. Because of this, he was pushed into war reporting for most of his life....read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Stephen Crane was born 1st November, 1871 in Newark, New Jersey and was the eighth surviving child out of fourteen. Incredibly he began writing at the age of four and was published several times by the age of sixteen. Crane only began a full-time education when he was nine but quickly mastered the grades needed to catch up and move forward. Although educated at Lafayette and Syracuse he had little interest in completing university and was keener to move on to a career, declaring college to be 'a waste of time'. By twenty he was a reporter and two years later had published his debut novel 'Maggie: A Girl of the Streets'. In literary circles this was hailed as the first work of American...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    There comes a time in the course of a battle when a soldier leaves his fate in the hands of the Gods of war. He carries on with the battle at hand, the only way he knows how - fight now, think later. Stephen Cranes' classic novel 'The Red Badge of Courage' offers us an insight into the mind of a young soldier. As he delves into the black depths of both PTSD and trauma, Cranes' striking descriptions and masterful prose make this captivating novel unmissable for fans of Jack London, John Steinbeck, and Edith Wharton. - Stephen Crane (1871-1900) was an American naturalist writer and journalist. He began writing as a child, but quit in favour of journalism following the death of his parents....read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Die Braut kommt nach Yellow Sky: Klassiker der Western-Geschichte von Stephen Crane. Der Sheriff kommt zurück in die Stadt und hat seine frisch angetraute Ehefrau dabei. Doch im Ort gibt es gerade Wichtigeres zu tun: Der lokale Revolverheld ist völlig betrunken und will ein Duell - mit dem...read more