Searching for: "Stephen Crane, Stephen Crane"

  • Stephen Crane

    Following its initial appearance in serial form, Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage was published as a complete work in 1895 and quickly became the benchmark for modern anti-war literature. In Henry Flemming, Stephen Crane creates a great and realistic study of the mind of an inexperienced soldier trapped in the fury and turmoil of war. Flemming dashes into battle, at first tormented by fear, then bolstered with courage in time for the final confrontation. Although the exact battle is never identified, Crane based this story of a soldier’s experiences during the American Civil War on the 1863 Battle of Chancellorsville. Many veterans, both Union and Confederate, praised...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Stephen Crane (1871-1900) was a prolific American poet, novelist and short story writer. He is recognised by modern critics as one of the most innovative writers of his generation. 'The Open Boat' is probably Stephen Crane's best known and most admired story. It tells the adventure of four sailors, the captain, the oiler, the cook and the correspondent, who are sole survivors of a shipwreck at sea in a small rowing boat off the coast of Florida. The camaraderie of the four, juxtaposed against the individual struggles which each has with his own mortality and the complete indifference in which the universe holds their fate, creates an atmosphere and dramatic tension as they face their last...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Published in 1899, just a year before his death, War Is Kind by Stephen Crane evokes again the dark imagery of war which made his fortune in The Red Badge Of Courage. Unlike that book, this collection leaves the battlefield itself behind to explore the damage war does to people’s hearts and minds. Reeking of dashed hopes, simultaneously sympathetic with the victims of war and cynical about the purposes of war, Crane implicitly criticizes the image of the romantic hero and asks if Love can survive. The poetic voice is one of an old and wearied soul, stark and disillusioned, which is all the more intriguing since Crane was dead before he reached his 30th birthday. His work calls to mind...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Published in 1899, just a year before his death, War Is Kind by Stephen Crane evokes again the dark imagery of war which made his fortune in The Red Badge Of Courage. Unlike that book, this collection leaves the battlefield itself behind to explore the damage war does to people's hearts and minds. Reeking of dashed hopes, simultaneously sympathetic with the victims of war and cynical about the purposes of war, Crane implicitly criticizes the image of the romantic hero and asks if Love can survive. The poetic voice is one of an old and wearied soul, stark and disillusioned, which is all the more intriguing since Crane was dead before he reached his 30th birthday. His work calls to mind the...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Henry Fleming is primed to prove his patriotism and to earn that “red badge of courage.”Bored with farm life, and anxious for some excitement, Henry Fleming sets off to join the Union troops fighting the Civil War. An inexperienced fighter, he is anxious to get into battle to prove his worth. He swaggers to keep up his spirits waiting for battle, but when suddenly thrust into the slaughter, he is overcome with blind fear and runs from the field of battle.He is ashamed when he joins the wounded, for he has not earned their 'red badge of courage' and becomes enraged when he witnesses the death of his terribly maimed friend. In a confused struggle with his own army’s...read more

  • Jack London

    Represented here are 16 short stories by seven great American writers, dating from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Different in atmosphere and writing style, they nevertheless caught the mood and concerns of the day in a way that was distinctly American. Kate Chopin's 'Regret' is a reflective moment in the life of a woman without children, forced to look after children; Bierce's 'An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge' leaves echoes in the imagination; the stories by Crane and London recall the themes of the Civil War and the Klondike for which they are well known. Twain's humor is to the fore in 'The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County' and O. Henry's sharp observation makes his...read more

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald

    Ten superbly narrated stories that help explain America by America's best writers. Irving's incredible and amusing tale of the archetypal 'Rip Van Winkle' relates the story of a man who slept through history. Stephen Crane's 'The Red Badge of Courage' tells of a young soldier who must struggle with his conscience no matter what the consequences. 'The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County' is Mark Twain's hilarious story of a contest to end all contests in the rowdy days of the Forty-Niners. Edgar Allan Poe's 'The Man of the Crowd' tells of one man's strange fascination with another. 'The Ransom of Red Chief' is another of O. Henry's tales of a kidnapping that goes horribly, horribly,...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    A searing tale of fear and courage, set during the Civil War, but more powerful today than ever. A young man enlists in the Union Army, but nervously wonders how he will react to the blood, violence, and death of a real battle. When that terrible day arrives, he flees the fighting in terror. But his cowardly behavior gnaws at his conscience, and he searches for redemption for what he has...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    First published in 1893, Maggie: A Girl of the Streets is the first published fiction work of American author Stephen Crane. A harrowing depiction of a pretty young girl's life in the slums of turn-of-the-century New York City and her eventual decline into prostitution, Crane's novel is a starkly realistic examination of poverty and the challenges brought about by the rapid industrialization the United States underwent in the late 1800s. An enduring classic, Maggie is often regarded as the first example of naturalism in American fiction, a literary movement that included such authors as Theodore Dreiser and Upton Sinclair. This edition also includes three of Crane's short stories: 'The...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Though best known for The Red Badge of Courage, his classic novel of men at war, in his tragically brief life and career Stephen Crane produced a wealth of stories that stand among the most acclaimed and enduring in the history of American fiction. This adaptation of Crane's classic short story ""The Pace of Youth"" was produced with wonderful sound effects and music by veteran radio theater producer Joe Bevilacqua, who is joined in the fine cast by William Melillo, Cathi Tully, Peter Cummings and Leslie...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Though best known for The RedBadge of Courage, his classic novel of men at war, Stephen Crane produced awealth of other stories that stand among the most acclaimed and enduring in thehistory of American fiction. This adaptation of Crane's classicshort story "The Pace of Youth" was produced with wonderful sound effects andmusic by veteran radio theater producer Joe Bevilacqua, who is joined in thefine cast by William Melillo, Cathi Tully, Peter Cummings, and Leslie...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    "Stephen Crane writes a tragic story depicting the cycle of abuse, and the impact it has on those involved. A young boy finds a homeless dog, desperate for love, and brings him into his home. What is frightening about Crane’s take on this typical relationship, a boy and his dog, are the parallels between the young boy’s treatment of the dog and his abusive, alcoholic father’s treatment of those around him. The amount of symbolism used throughout this essay is staggering, and is the main literary element used in this piece of work. Written in 1890, this story reflects the period of time that came shortly before known as Jim...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    The Open Boat, and Other Stories features four prized selections by Stephen Crane, recognized by modern critics as one of the most innovative writers of his generation. "The Open Boat" is based on a harrowing incident in the author's life: the 1897 sinking of a ship on which he was a passenger; "The Blue Hotel" and "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky" reflect Crane's early travels in Mexico and the American Southwest; and the novella Maggie: A Girl of the Streets is a galvanizing portrait of life in the slums of New York...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    This story is about a young soldier, Henry Fleming, fighting in the American Civil War. It is a vivid and stark portrayal of war on the human psyche, interspersed with symbolic imagery and biblical metaphors. The story realistically portrays the young soldier's physical and psychological struggles after fleeing from his first encounter with a battle. He returns to his regiment to become a strong soldier and even taking on the task of the flag bearer in the final battle. Though Stephen Crane had never been in any combat situations, his interviews with a wide number of veterans enabled him to create this novel, widely regarded as a unusually realistic depiction of a young man in...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    There comes a time in the course of battle when a participant casts his fate to the gods of war, and carries on without question, the task at hand. Living, dying, right or wrong, can be contemplated later. The spirit of the bayonet takes over and carries the youth through the crucible of battle to emerge a short time later several ages older. Stephen Cranes classic novel gives us a glimpse into the mind of a young soldier as he passes through the experience he will never be able to forget, and possibly awaken him from his slumber in a sweat and panic for years to...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    This Stephen Crane masterpiece of the Civil War searches the emotions of a raw recruit thrown into battle totally unaware of the ferocity and horror awaiting him. Expecting heroism and glory, he becomes frightened and confused when he finds himself exhibiting cowardice in the face of the enemy. Through a series of events he begins to find his courage, successfully conceals his act of cowardice, and takes his place in the frontlines of...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Stephen Crane's first novel, Maggie: A Girl of the Streets has been called "the first dark flower of American Naturalism" for its distinctive elements of naturalistic fiction. The chief character, Maggie, descends into prostitution after being led astray by her lover. Rather than focusing on those that make up the very rich or middle class, the novel highlights the deplorable living conditions of the working class during the so-called Gilded Age in New York's Bowery. (Summary adapted from Wikipedia by...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Stephen Crane (1871-1900) was a prolific American poet, novelist, and short story writer. He is recognized by modern critics as one of the most innovative writers of his generation. 'The Black Dog' is a supernatural tale of a group of travellers who seek shelter in a remote cabin where an old man lies dying. They hear from the man's nephew of a local tale that when death arrives, it is preceded by the appearance of a ghostly black dog which howls outside the...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    There comes a time in the course of battle when a participant casts his fate to the gods of war, and carries on without question, the task at hand. Living, dying, right or wrong, can be contemplated later. The spirit of the bayonet takes over and carries the youth through the crucible of battle to emerge a short time later several ages older. Stephen Cranes classic novel gives us a glimpse into the mind of a young soldier as he passes through the experience he will never be able to forget, and possibly awaken him from his slumber in a sweat and panic for years to come. Narrated by Mike Vendetti, Purple Heart, November 1965 (Summary by Mike...read more

  • Anton Chekhov

    This group of four classic stories from the 19th century includes works that appear in many collections of European literature. Offering tantalizing revelations and unforgettable characters, these tales have delighted readers ever since they were first published. In Stephen Crane's The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky, glowing newlyweds find an unexpected ally on the dusty streets of an American frontier town. Ill-fated Christmas gifts cross paths in O.Henry's touching The Gift of the Magi. A bohemian artist uses a colorful image to save a young woman's life in another tale by O.Henry: The Last Leaf. And in The Lady With a Toy Dog, Anton Chekhov examines the terrible, tender snares of memory and...read more