Searching for: "Stephen Crane, Stephen Crane"

  • Stephen Crane

    How far would a father go to keep his daughter from marrying the wrong man? Rufus Coleman, the respected editor of the New York Eclipse, plans to marry Marjory Wainwright. Yet to her father, Professor Wainwright, Rufus is still the wastrel that he thought him to be as a student in college. To thwart the marriage, the professor drags Marjory off with him and a group of students on a summer tour of Greece. Suddenly war erupts between Turkey and Greece! Will Rufus arrive in time to save the group? Will he redeem himself in the professor's eyes? Will the strife of war and trial of separation be overcome by the love between Rufus and...read more

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald

    Ten superbly narrated stories that help explain America by America's best writers. Irving's incredible and amusing tale of the archetypal 'Rip Van Winkle' relates the story of a man who slept through history. Stephen Crane's 'The Red Badge of Courage' tells of a young soldier who must struggle with his conscience no matter what the consequences. 'The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County' is Mark Twain's hilarious story of a contest to end all contests in the rowdy days of the Forty-Niners. Edgar Allan Poe's 'The Man of the Crowd' tells of one man's strange fascination with another. 'The Ransom of Red Chief' is another of O. Henry's tales of a kidnapping that goes horribly, horribly,...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    An army lieutenant concentrates on rationing out his company's supply of coffee, meticulously dividing the brown squares before him, when a shot rings out. The enlisted men, startled by the noise, suddenly see blood saturating their lieutenant's sleeve. In pain, the wounded officer sways, winces in disbelief, mutely surveys the forest, and tries instinctively and clumsily to sheathe the sword that he has been using to count out the coffee packets. His mind swirls with mysterious revelations about existence and the meaning of life. As his dumbstruck, sympathetic...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Stephen Crane (1871-1900) was a prolific American poet, novelist, and short story writer. He is recognized by modern critics as one of the most innovative writers of his generation. 'The Black Dog' is a supernatural tale of a group of travellers who seek shelter in a remote cabin where an old man lies dying. They hear from the man's nephew of a local tale that when death arrives, it is preceded by the appearance of a ghostly black dog which howls outside the...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    A collection of enigmatic...read more

  • Jack London

    Represented here are 16 short stories by seven great American writers, dating from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Different in atmosphere and writing style, they nevertheless caught the mood and concerns of the day in a way that was distinctly American. Kate Chopin's 'Regret' is a reflective moment in the life of a woman without children, forced to look after children; Bierce's 'An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge' leaves echoes in the imagination; the stories by Crane and London recall the themes of the Civil War and the Klondike for which they are well known. Twain's humor is to the fore in 'The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County' and O. Henry's sharp observation makes his...read more

  • Jack London

    This collection features a selection of classic short stories and poems by legendary Western authors Stephen Crane, Bret Harte, and Jack London. Stephen Crane "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky" read by William Windom "The Black Riders" (poem) read by Stefan Rudnicki "The Five White Mice" read by Arte Johnson "The Blue Hotel" read by Stefan Rudnicki "His New Mittens" read by Robert Forster "A Newspaper..." (poem) read by Stefan Rudnicki "The Little Regiment" read by Stephen Hoye Bret Harte "The Outcasts of Poker Flat" read by William Windom "Mary's Album" (poem) read by Stefan Rudnicki "Brown of Calaveras" read by Stephen Hoye "The Society upon the Stanislaw" (poem) read by...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    "Stephen Crane writes a tragic story depicting the cycle of abuse, and the impact it has on those involved. A young boy finds a homeless dog, desperate for love, and brings him into his home. What is frightening about Crane’s take on this typical relationship, a boy and his dog, are the parallels between the young boy’s treatment of the dog and his abusive, alcoholic father’s treatment of those around him. The amount of symbolism used throughout this essay is staggering, and is the main literary element used in this piece of work. Written in 1890, this story reflects the period of time that came shortly before known as Jim...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    A Dark Brown Dog: A Stephen Crane Story "A Dark Brown Dog" is an unexpected Stephen Crane jewel. Crane is best known for three short stories, "The Open Boat", thought by many to be the best short story ever written; "The Blue Hotel"; and "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky". Simply has recorded over 10 more stories that deserve to be right up there with the top three. As Simply says, this is not an NFL Power ranking, or a compare and contrast assignment. This is your opportunity to enjoy many of Crane's other illuminating and moving works. "A Dark Brown Dog" is the first cousin of Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, in being set in the rough, tough world of the New York Bowery of the late 19th...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    A Desertion is a short story published in 1900 about a young woman who is suspected by others in the neighborhood of indiscretion that might trouble her...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    An Episode of War, which is quite short, is an unexpected Stephen Crane jewel. Crane is best known for three short stories, "The Open Boat, thought by many to be the best short story ever written, "The Blue Hotel", and "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky". "An Episode of War" is perhaps the best known of the other ten Crane stories Simply recorded. It deserves to be right up there with the top three. As Simply says, this is not an NFL Power ranking, or a compare and contrast assignment. This is your opportunity to enjoy many of Crane's other illuminating and moving works. An Episode of War captures the randomness, futility, and danger of wartime as the Lieutenant is wounded while dividing up...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    An Experiment in Luxury is the book end of all this as a young man visits his rich friend and his millionaire family. It is a conventional scene in which the young man's friend, son of the household, encourages him to speak only conventionally to his mother or he will get on her bad side. We see her preoccupied with her worries and the husband/millionaire taking his mind off of it all by playing with a kitten. They have their dinners, along with arguments between the friend and his sisters, providing some entertainment at the table, and the story grinds to an end. This is best listened to along with its book end, An Experiment in Luxury, to get the full force of it...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    An Experiment in Misery in a story similar to "The Men in the Storm" except that it focuses on one character, and a new fellow traveler called the Assassin, who struggle for warmth and a place for the night. The main character stops first at a saloon for free soup with a beer, where he meets the Assassin. The Assassin accosts the man seeking a few cents for a room. They join forces with the Assassin identifying the place cheap enough for the other man to stay in, and the man gives him the few cents he needs for the room. The next morning the man fronts him a few cents for breakfast and they have it together. They go to a park bench to wait while others work. They get ready in their...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Flanagan: His Short Filibustering Adventure Flanagan is a story not dissimilar from The Open Boat except that the captain does in Flanagan but not in the Open Boat. Flanagan is hired to take a ship, aptly named the Foundling, down to Cuba to run guns and people into Cuba. He does so in a rickety old boat and does a good job. A gun boat finds them and barrels at them at top speed. Rather than just running, the natural instinct, Flanagan turns his ship towards the small gun boat, an unexpected chess move, and runs down the surprised small gun boat at sinks her. Afterward, his men make sure to gun down the survivors in their life boats to assure no followup. After this great victory,...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    George's Mother George's Mother is a moving story about a mother, the little old woman, and her son, George. They are in the same tenement as the Johnsons of Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, but have a much dearer relationship. George's Mother is at the center of it all as a warm loving mother, worried about her son. When George hears his mother is sick, he comes home immediately despite looking uncool to his rowdy friends, and soothes his mother. He shows his deep caring for her which moves her as well. Critics have spoken about George's being a drunk, an alcoholic, and the like. But that is not core to the story because George keeps his job for a long time; when he loses it, much of...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    A Great Mistake, which is quite short, is an unexpected Stephen Crane jewel. Crane is best known for three short stories, "The Open Boat", thought by many to be the best short story ever written, "The Blue Hotel", and "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky". Simply has recorded over ten more stories that deserve to be right up there with the top three. As Simply says, this is not an NFL Power ranking, or a compare and contrast assignment. This is your opportunity to enjoy many of Crane's other illuminating and moving works." A Great Mistake" relates to a common theme of coveting something out of reach, in this case on fruit cart, when fruit was a far more expensive and unobtainable product than...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    His New Mittens An interesting story about how a boy goes to school with new mittens his mother wants him to protect. To do so he cannot join in a snowball fight with his friends with parents less scrupulous about clothing and the like. The boy ultimately gives in, gets in trouble with his mother, is made to eat alone, attempts to run away much but only makes it to their cold shed. He then gathers his forces to leave for California, where ever that might be. He gets to the street, trudges up in one direction, and see the butcher's shop. Here is a Winesburg, Ohio moment, when the boy enters the store, he is lucky that the store owner, having been a boy himself, sees something is wrong....read more

  • Stephen Crane

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 11 recordings of In the Desert by Stephen Crane. This was the weekly poetry project for December 7th,...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Originally published pseudonymously in 1893, Maggie: A Girl of the Streets follows the tragic tale of Maggie and her life in the harsh streets and tenements of the New York City Bowery district. Initially rejected by publishers for being viewed as too brutal and accurate in its descriptions of poverty and female sexuality, Stephen Crane published the work at his own expense. Following the success of Crane's novel The Red Badge of Courage, this novel was reissued in 1896 with extensive rewrites and edits. Generally considered to be the first work of American Naturalism, Crane combines exhaustive research and an attention to detail to create an accurate depiction of life for the working poor...read more

  • Stephen Crane

    Stephen Crane's first novel, Maggie: A Girl of the Streets has been called "the first dark flower of American Naturalism" for its distinctive elements of naturalistic fiction. The chief character, Maggie, descends into prostitution after being led astray by her lover. Rather than focusing on those that make up the very rich or middle class, the novel highlights the deplorable living conditions of the working class during the so-called Gilded Age in New York's Bowery. (Summary adapted from Wikipedia by...read more