Searching for: "Stephen Leacock"

  • Stephen Leacock

    'The Marine Excursion of the Knights of Pythias' is the third story from Stephen Leacock’s masterpiece story sequence 'Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town'. It deals with an exploration of the social, political, and religious aspects of life in Mariposa, while some of its citizens are on a cruise holiday excursion. Spirits are high when catastrophe strikes. An extremely interesting parody of sea voyages, 'The Marine Excursion' is a charming and ironic story, and a very representative portrayal of Leacock’s own view of his contemporary Canadians. Stephen Leacock (1869-1944) was a Canadian writer, teacher, and political person. During the first two decades of the 20th century, he was...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    This a typical Christmas story but with a classic Leacock ironic twist and a zest of humour. 'The Errors of Santa Claus' is a charming tale of gift-giving and kindness. It is Christmas time and parents are getting their children's gifts ready. But what happens when these gifts become rather interesting and lovely for the adults and start playing with them before their kids? Written with a lot of humour, irony, and light-heartedness, 'The Errors of Santa Claus' is a perfect Christmas tale both for a Leacock fans but also for readers in search of some comic relief. B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    The First World War has left the world in agony. Disillusionment, hopelessness, and horror are rife when a despondent author gets a visit by Father Time and Father Christmas, who come to raise his spirits. He wishes for better days, but the war has taken everything, turning him into a hopeless and angry nihilist. Nevertheless, the Christmas spirit is here to bring hope and another chance at happiness. 'Merry Christmas' is a poignant short story where Stephen Leacock unleashes his ironic and satirical potential, together with his usual socially critical tone, to construct a narrative about the erosion of Christmas values. A must for fans of the author and for winter time reading. B. J....read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town is a sequence of stories by Stephen Leacock, first published in 1912. It is generally considered to be one of the most enduring classics of Canadian humorous literature. The fictional setting for these stories is Mariposa, a small town on the shore of Lake Wissanotti. Although drawn from his experiences in Orillia, Ontario, Leacock writes in the introduction: "Mariposa is not a real town. On the contrary, it is about seventy or eighty of them. You may find them all the way from Lake Superior to the sea, with the same square streets and the same maple trees and the same churches and hotels." This work has remained popular for its universal appeal. Many of...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    This lengthy political essay by noted Canadian humourist Stephen Leacock was written while he was professor of political economy at McGill University. He argues for a middle ground between individualism/capitalism and pure socialism. Listeners in the early 21st century may find this 90-year old essay oddly topical. (Summary by Sean Michael...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    Seventeen goofy stories and essays by Canadian humourist Stephen Leacock. "Professor Leacock has made more people laugh with the written word than any other living author. One may say he is one of the greatest jesters, the greatest humorist of the age." - A. P. Herbert (Introduction by TriciaG &...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    This lengthy political essay by noted Canadian humourist Stephen Leacock was written while he was professor of political economy at McGill University. He argues for a middle ground between capitalism and pure socialism. Listeners in the early 21st century may find this 90-year old essay oddly topical. (Summary by Sean Michael...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    "In the course of time a very considerable public feeling was aroused in the United States and Canada over this state of affairs. The lack of reciprocity in it seemed unfair. It was felt (or at least I felt) that the time had come when some one ought to go over and take some impressions off England. The choice of such a person (my choice) fell upon myself. By an arrangement with the Geographical Society of America, acting in conjunction with the Royal Geographical Society of England (to both of whom I communicated my proposal), I went at my own expense." And from thence follow the impressions of Canadian political economist and humourist, Stephen Leacock, after a lecturing visit to...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    "Stephen P. H. Butler Leacock (1869 - 1944) was a Canadian teacher, political scientist, writer, and humorist. ""Number Fifty-Six"" is a humorous tale of a Chinese laundryman who gets to know his clients through their laundry habits. He is able to infer much from the state of the various shirts, handkerchiefs, waistcoats etc. which are delivered to him for washing. Of all his clients he is most fascinated by number fifty-six... a man with strangely fluctuating shirt habits. And then one fateful day, a dreadful set of laundry is delivered to...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    From the cave man to Santa Claus; spies, know-it-alls, and journalists: all are fair game for Leacock's special brand of humor. He touches on the changes time has brought about in the city, education, and work habits. Among the other topics in this work are nature, fishing, gardening, success, and spirits--both of the departed and of the variety Prohibition...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    Short sketches relating the humourous side of life in 1910. "Professor Leacock has made more people laugh with the written word than any other living author. One may say he is one of the greatest jesters, the greatest humorist of the age." - A. P. Herbert (Summary by TriciaG and...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    8 great spoofs of 'types' of fiction by the premier Canadian humorist Leacock, taken from his book Nonsense Novels. The title of each parody gives away it's genre: Soaked in Seaweed or, Upset in the Ocean; Maddened by Mystery: or, The Defective Detective; "Q." A Psychic Pstory of the Psupernatural; Guido the Gimlet of Ghent: A Romance of Chivalry; The Man in Asbestos: an Allegory of the Future; Sorrows of a Super Soul: or, The Memoirs of Marie Mushenough; A Hero in Homespun: or, The Life Struggle of Hezekiah Hayloft and Caroline's Christmas: or, The Inexplicable Infant. If you enjoy take offs and parodies, the stories in this collection are for you. See how many types you recognize as you...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    More stories by Canadian Stephen Leacock. Some of these stories carry over characters introduced in Further Foolishness. Some stories are humourous; some are more thoughtful. It helps to be familiar with WWI-era European politics to catch much of the humour. (Summary by...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    Eight silly stories by Canadian humourist Stephen Leacock. (Summary by Tricia...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    Ten silly stories by Canadian humourist Stephen Leacock. (Summary by Tricia...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    A collection containing a parody on Problem Plays, as well as humorous anecdotes from Canadian humourist Stephen Leacock. (Summary by...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    A collection of wry looks at literature, education, and other social phenomena by Canadian humourist and economics professor, Stephen Leacock. (Summary by...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    This is volume 20 of The Chronicles of Canada series. This volume describes the explorers who braved the Canadian Arctic in search of the Northwest Passage, focusing on Samuel Hearne, Sir Alexander Mackenzie, and Sir John Franklin. (Summary by...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    Jacques Cartier grew up as a sailor, married well and became an agent of exploration for King Francis I of France. In April, 1534, he sailed for the New World. Before sailing, his men took an oath that they would “behave themselves truly and faithfully in the service of the Most Christian King.” Jacques’ name was made immortal by the faithfulness with which he and his men carried out that oath. Summary from Christian History Institute, used with...read more

  • Stephen Leacock

    This book describes Canada from the beginning of existence to its first European discoverers and includes a brief history of the aboriginal people. These little books were designed to cover Canadian history in a scholarly and readable...read more