Searching for: "Wendy McElroy"

  • Wendy McElroy

    This rich culture of East Africa, known in the Bible as Abyssinia, claims descent from King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba. Under a Marxist regime, however, this ancient people has suffered from famine and genocide. This presentation chronicles the heartbreak of Ethiopia, which mirrors many of the crises besieging the third world countries of Africa. The World’s Political Hot Spots series explains the basis of conflicts in some of the world’s most politically sensitive areas. Many of these regions are in today’s headlines, and tensions recently have become violent in virtually all of them. Each presentation covers up to ten centuries of background, revealing how and why...read more

  • Wendy McElroy

    Germany is historically one of the most important of all nations. Since emerging from its days as a Roman province, Germany (including Prussia) has had a central role in European affairs. It has reached the heights in art, music, literature, and political power, yet it’s also reached the depths in humiliating military defeat and partition. This presentation reviews the broad sweep of German history. The World’s Political Hot Spots series explains the basis of conflicts in some of the world’s most politically sensitive areas. Many of these regions are in today’s headlines, and tensions recently have become violent in virtually all of them. Each presentation covers up...read more

  • Wendy McElroy

    Civil Disobedience discusses Thoreau’s arguments for civil disobedience: the deliberate violation of laws for reasons of conscience. Thoreau’s concept is based on the belief that no law should command blind obedience and that non-cooperation with unjust laws is both morally correct and socially beneficial. The Liberator was a leading voice for abolitionism in the nineteenth century. Abolitionism called for the immediate emancipation of slaves, based on the principle that individuals own their bodies, labor, and the fruits of their labor. Abolitionists vigorously opposed gradualists, who called for phasing out slavery over a long period of time; they also opposed...read more

  • Wendy McElroy

    This presentation discusses two political documents that have changed history: Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto and Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Social Contract. In the Communist Manifesto, Marx argues that history flows inevitably toward a social revolution, which will result in a society without economic classes, private property, or a state. This presentation examines Marx's theory and goals and the influence of other philosophers on his work. Rousseau believed that people secure their liberty by entering into an implied contract with government. His controversial explanation of social authority in Social Contract fanned the flames of the French Revolution. This presentation explores the...read more

  • Joseph Stromberg

    Following World War II, the United States and Soviet Russia vied for dominance around the world in an intense contest called the Cold War. Both Korea and Vietnam felt the full brunt of this conflict, and each was divided into two ideologically opposed sectors; to the north, the Communists dominated, while to the south, the United States prevailed. In both countries, America would face her worst nightmare: a land war in Asia. It began in Korea but continued in Vietnam, where more than fifty-eight thousand Americans would die. During the course of the Vietnam War, one American president was assassinated, another declined to seek reelection, and a third was discredited. Just as the fabric of...read more

  • Wendy McElroy

    This is the story of a war during which one American president was assassinated, another declined to seek reelection, and a third was discredited. It is the story of a war whose legacy remains with us today in the names of the more than fifty-eight thousand Americans who died in Vietnam inscribed on a black granite monument in Washington, DC. Just as the fabric of society in Vietnam was torn to shreds by the continued political upheaval, the Vietnam War powerfully shaped our world. The United States at War Series is a collection of audio presentations that review the political, economic, and social forces that have erupted in military conflict. They describe the historical context for each...read more

  • Wendy McElroy

    In the fall of 1787, each of the thirteen states assembled special conventions to consider ratification of a proposed Constitution of the United States. Without ratification by nine conventions, the Constitution would flounder: America would be a league of states, not one nation. Some states, such as Delaware and Georgia, quickly and unanimously ratified. Other states, such as Virginia and New York, agonized. Two states, North Carolina and Rhode Island, would not ratify at all without a bill of rights. Indeed, Rhode Island would not approve the Constitution until economic sanctions had been imposed against her. The Constitution was a controversial document, which was passionately debated...read more

  • Wendy McElroy

    Machiavelli wrote The Prince for his ruler as a guide for gaining and keeping power. Central themes of his essay are the relation between politics and ethics, what the best form of government consists of; the importance of the Church, and the growth of Italy as a nation-state. The word "Machiavellian" often suggests sinister motives, but some scholars question this traditional interpretation. Boétie wrote Discourse on Voluntary Servitude in sixteenth-century France during the birth of the nation-state, the rise of absolute monarchy, and intense religious and civil wars. He examines the psychology of political obedience, the structure and specific mechanisms of state authority, the motives...read more

  • Wendy McElroy

    By the end of World War I, Britain had promised control of Palestine both to Arabs and Jews. Each of these peoples claimed a longstanding right to the same piece of land, and violence was inevitable. This presentation examines how and why this magical land has become a virtual war zone. The World’s Political Hotspots Series explains the basis of conflicts in some of the world’s most politically sensitive areas. Many of these regions are in today’s headlines, and tensions recently have become violent in virtually all of them. Each presentation covers up to ten centuries of background, revealing how and why today’s problems...read more

  • Wendy McElroy

    At the end of World War II, the United States and Soviet Russia vied for dominance around the world. This contest was called the Cold War. Both Korea and Vietnam felt the full brunt of this conflict; each country was divided into two ideologically opposing sectors. To the north, the Communists dominated; to the south, the United States prevailed. In both countries, America faced what has been called her worst nightmare: involvement in a land war in Asia. The United States at War Series is a collection of audio presentations that review the political, economic, and social forced that have erupted in military conflict. They describe the historical context for each of the nine major US wars...read more

  • Wendy McElroy

    More than half of the world’s oil comes from Persian Gulf states. Political instability and religious strife there threaten to interrupt the world’s economic routines. Two presentations examine the history of Persia, Iran’s attempt to westernize, and the backlash of religiously fervent Muslims against the West and each other. The World’s Political Hot Spots Series explains the basis of conflicts in some of the world’s most politically sensitive areas. Many of these regions are in today’s headlines, and tensions recently have become violent in virtually all of them. Each presentation covers up to ten centuries of background, revealing how and why...read more

  • Wendy McElroy

    This presentation examines two eloquent arguments for human liberty: John Stuart Mill’s On Liberty and Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman. In On Liberty, the great philosopher John Stuart Mill rigorously defends individual liberty based on the concept of utilitarianism, or “the greatest happiness for the greatest number.” Though his theoretical foundation rejects natural rights, he reaches a similar conclusion—that diversity in individual thought and action ultimately benefits society. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman is a classic, pioneering work in woman’s rights which has influenced feminists for over two centuries. It is...read more

  • Wendy McElroy

    With a culture dating back to at least 700 BC, West Africa has a long and rich history. British influence after the sixteenth century, and especially in the eighteenth century, changed the region’s course. By 1967, Nigeria was at war with itself, with the “Republic of Biafra” produced in Nigeria’s eastern region. Over a million people perished. This is the story of Nigeria’s struggle, which typifies the history and outlook of the West African region. The World’s Political Hot Spots series explains the basis of conflicts in some of the world’s most politically sensitive areas. Many of these regions are in today’s headlines, and tensions...read more

  • Wendy McElroy

    The “isle of poets and scholars” has known almost constant warfare for centuries. In 1920, it was divided into North and South. Yet this purely political solution left a religious and cultural schism intact. This presentation follows Ireland’s tragic course from St. Patrick to Britain’s imposition of direct rule in 1974. The World’s Political Hotspots Series explains the basis of conflicts in some of the world’s most politically sensitive areas. Many of these regions are in today’s headlines, and tensions recently have become violent in virtually all of them. Each presentation covers up to ten centuries of background, revealing how and why...read more

  • Wendy McElroy

    The US Constitution was approved by the Constitutional Convention on September 17, 1787. It was to become law only if it was ratified by nine of the thirteen states. New York was a key state, but it contained strong forces opposing the Constitution. A series of eighty-five letters appeared in New York City newspapers between October 1787 and August 1788 urging support for the Constitution. These letters remain the first and most authoritative commentary on the American concept of federal government.  Later known as The Federalist Papers, they were published under the pseudonym 'Publius,' although written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay. This presentation explores the...read more