Searching for: "William Dean Howells"

  • Henry Ford

    01. F.Scott Fitzgerald - The Curious Case of Benjamin Button 02. O.Henry - The Gift of the Magi 03. Mark Twain - On The Decay of the Art of Lying 04. Sun Tzu - The Art of War 05. E.A. Poe - The Raven 06. Kahlil Gibran - The Madman 07. W.W. Jacobs - The Monkey's Paw 08. Anonymous - Aladdin 09. The Founding Fathers - The Declaration of Independence 10. Plato - The Apology of Socrates 11. Lord Alfred Tennyson - Charge of the Light Brigade 12. T.S. Eliot - The Waste Land 13. William Dean Howells - Wild Flowers of the Asphalt 14. Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels - The Communist Manifesto 15. E.A. Poe - The Pit and the Pendulum 16. F. Scott Fitzgerald - The Offshore Pirate 17. Leo...read more

  • William Dean Howells

    Five short delightful stories for children, told in the voice of "the papa" to "the girl" and "the boy." William Dean Howells (March 1, 1837 – May 11, 1920) was an American realist author and literary critic. Nicknamed "The Dean of American Letters", he was particularly known for his tenure as editor of the Atlantic Monthly as well as his own prolific writings, including the Christmas story "Christmas Every Day" and the novel The Rise of Silas Lapham. (Reader’s Note for story 3: A pony engine is a small locomotive for switching cars from one track to another.) (Summary by Wikipedia and David...read more

  • William Dean Howells

    A light-hearted romantic comedy in twelve short scenes, set during a tea party in the home of Mrs. Amy Somers, a widow who is courted by the ingenuous and delightful Mr. Willis Campbell. (Summary by Ruth...read more

  • William Dean Howells

    Howell's novel is set in New York of the late nineteenth century, a city familiar to readers of Edith Wharton and Henry James. Basil March, a businessman from Boston of a literary bent, moves with his family to New York to edit a new journal founded by an acquaintance. Its financial support, however, comes from a Mr. Dryfoos, a Pennsylvania Dutch farmer suddenly become millionaire by the discovery of natural gas on his property, and now living in New York with his family in a style he hopes will befit his new wealth. Is it his new fortune that presents a hazard? Or is it the new wealth of New York City in the Gilded Age? Both March and his literary creator are increasingly aware of some of...read more

  • William Dean Howells

    Indian Summer is an 1886 novel by William Dean Howells. Theodore Colville is a respected newspaperman in Des Vaches, Indiana. However, after a bad political move, his fans criticize him and his pride cannot withstand that. A concurrence is set up, and Colville decides to just give up the newspaper business. He sells his company to the new one. He feels he needs to take a long vacation, so he travels to Florence. Colville hasn't been in Florence in almost 20 years. At that time he was a young architect, and Jenny Wheelwright broke his heart. In Florence he runs into a person he wasn't eager to ever see again: Mrs. Bowen, whom he once knew as Lina Ridgely. She was best friends with Jenny. She...read more

  • William Dean Howells

    A charming brief account of a two months' autumnal stay on the shores of the Lake of Geneva. Howells, who was there with his family traveling from England to Italy, has a sharp eye not only for scenery and architecture, but for people and customs, both Swiss and foreign. (Summary by Nicholas...read more

  • William Dean Howells

    William Dean Howells (1837-1920) became fast friends with Mark Twain from the moment in 1869 when Twain strode into the office of The Atlantic Monthly in Boston to thank Howell, then its assistant editor, for his favorable review of Innocents Abroad. When Howells became editor a few years later, The Atlantic Monthly began serializing many of Twain's works, among them his non-fiction masterpiece, Life on the Mississippi. In My Mark Twain, Howells pens a literary memoir that includes such fascinating scenes as their meetings with former president Ulysses Grant who was then writing the classic autobiography that Twain would underwrite in the largest publishing deal until that time. But it is...read more

  • William Dean Howells

    Howells’ best-known work and a subtle classic of its time, The Rise of Silas Lapham is an elegant tale of Boston society and manners. After garnering a fortune in the paint business, Silas Lapham moves his family from their Vermont farm to the city of Boston in order to improve his social position. The consequences of this endeavor are both humorous and tragic as the greedy Silas brings his company to the brink of bankruptcy. The novel focuses on important themes in the American literary tradition—the efficacy of self-help and determination, the ambiguous benefits of social and economic progress, and the continual contradiction between urban and pastoral values—and...read more

  • William Dean Howells

    A short story that intricately discusses the wild flowers found amoung the asphalt and concrete of New York...read more

  • William Dean Howells

    This collection of Poetry and Prose is an explosion of femininity, empowerment, and personal growth. Michelle celebrates her triumph over mental illness and promotes resilience and self-love in her...read more

  • William Dean Howells

    This short story is a delightful tale of a writer with a deadline who is on a winter walk. This story epitomizes an example of the creative path that a writer may take while viewing a normal everyday scene and formulating a cohesive story line from the basic...read more

  • William Dean Howells

    This short story is a delightful tale of a writer with a deadline who is on a winter walk. This story epitomizes an example of the creative path that a writer may take while viewing a normal everyday scene and formulating a cohesive story line from the basic...read more