Searching for: "William Wood"

  • Robert Williams Wood

    How do you tell apart a parrot from a carrot? A plover from a clover? A bay from a jay? Although there are several ways of differentiating, R. W. Wood's use of pun and rhyme is one of the most entertaining! (Summary by Andrea...read more

  • William Wood

    Louisbourg was no mere isolated stronghold which could be lost or won without affecting the wider issues of oversea dominion. On the contrary, it was a necessary link in the chain of waterside posts which connected France with America by way of the Atlantic, the St Lawrence, the Great Lakes, and the Mississippi. But since the chain itself and all its other links, and even the peculiar relation of Louisbourg to the Acadians and the Conquest, have been fully described elsewhere in the Chronicles of Canada, the present volume only tries to tell the purely individual tale. (Summary from Book...read more

  • William Wood

    No exhaustive Canadian 'water history' can possibly be attempted here. That would require a series of its own. But at least a first attempt will be made to give some general idea of what such a history would contain in fuller detail: of the kayaks and canoes the Eskimos and Indians used before the white man came, and use today; of the small craft moved by oar and sail that slowly displaced those moved only by the paddle; of the sailing vessels proper, and how they plied along Canadian waterways, and on all the Seven Seas; of the steamers, which shed so much forgotten lustre on Canadian enterprise; of the teeming fisheries which the far-seeing Lord Bacon rightly thought 'richer treasures...read more

  • William Wood

    "International disputes that end in war are not generally questions of absolute right and wrong. They may quite as well be questions of opposing rights. But, when there are rights on both sides; it is usually found that the side which takes the initiative is moved by its national desires as well as by its claims of right. This could hardly be better exemplified than by the vexed questions which brought about the War of 1812." This volume of the Chronicles of Canada series explains both the causes of the War of 1812 and the campaigns of the war from a primarily Canadian viewpoint, a perspective that is very often missed in writings on this Americo-British conflict. (By...read more

  • William Wood

    Montcalm is, of course, a very prominent character in every history of New France. This book gives a brief history of the Montcalm family in France and its importance in wars. It continues with its descendant as he moves to Canada and defends the French colony of Ticonderoga. Summary by...read more

  • William Wood

    Any life of Wolfe can be artificially simplified by treating his purely military work as something complete in itself and not as a part of a greater whole. But, since such treatment gives a totally false idea of his achievement, this little sketch, drawn straight from original sources, tries to show him as he really was, a co-worker with the British fleet in a war based entirely on naval strategy and inseparably connected with international affairs of world-wide significance. The only simplification attempted here is that of arrangement and expression. (Author's...read more

  • William Wood

    Carleton’s first eight years as governor of Canada were almost entirely occupied with civil administration. The next four were equally occupied with war. This is the account of how Carleton and his multiracial army fought off the American invasion of Quebec. It is the first time French and British troops worked together to defend Canada. Summary by...read more