Searching for: "Wink Martindale"

  • Wink Martindale

    Wayne Newton doesn't believe in limitations. His prosperous career is a testament to this fact, as Newton worked to constantly push boundaries and connect with audiences in his live performances. His drive and work ethic have been a constant in his longstanding career. Newton discussed sat down for a conversation with Wink Martindale in April of 1977. He discusses how he works to keep his live show fresh, his appreciation for fans and how his professional struggles early on shape his outlook on his level of...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Vic Damone quit school as a teenager to work at the Paramount Theater to help support his family after his father was injured. During this time he was exposed to a host of accomplished singers both on the stage and behind the scenes. While operating the backstage elevator for Perry Como, Damone asked if he could sing for him to see if he had any talent. He stopped the elevator between floors and after he finished, Como told him he should keep it up. In two different interviews from 1973 and 2003, Como discusses how this experience kicked off his fascinating career that spanned seven decades. Wink Martindale takes listeners on an exploration of the riveting journey from that moment, to his...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Tony Bennett took his place at the forefront of pop music when he recorded "I Left My Heart in San Francisco" in 1962. Despite being trained in art, Bennett made the decision to pursue a career in music that included a stint as a singing waiter. Bennett spoke with Wink Martindale in August of 1972 about his accomplished career that included numerous awards, honors and hit singles. He discusses his numerous hit songs throughout the 1950s and beyond. While he sang some contemporary songs, Bennett never delved into rock and always stayed true to his unique singing...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    In a time when hard rock was all the rage, The Carpenters were bringing a softer sound to the airwaves of the 1970s. While many artists churned out new music constantly, they took a different approach. They waited for a great song with a great sound to come together, only putting out a new song when they were sure they were putting out a hit. Siblings Karen and Richard Carpenter sat down with Wink Martindale in 1970 during the success of Close To You. The duo shared an intimate look at what went into the process of creating music and discuss their security in creating easy listening...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Husband and wife duo Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gormé performed back-and-forth comic banter while keeping music at the center of their act. While much of the act was meticulously rehearsed, the pair left parts of each performance open for adlibbing and improvisation. In an interview with host Wink Martindale, Steve and Eydie sit down and discuss how they had met, their early lives and their love for performing. Martindale gives listeners an entertaining look at the couple's career and personal...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Sammy Davis Jr. was, quite literally, born into show business. As part of a well-known vaudeville family, he began performing when he was just four years old and never seemed to slow down. From stage to studio to screen the singer, dancer, musician and actor travelled all over the world entertaining millions. Wink Martindale spoke with the charming Davis at his Beverly Hills home in 1976. Davis reflects on his experiences as a performer, his success and his life in the crazy world of show business. He also shares engaging stories of times with colleagues and friends throughout his...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Roy Orbison was just one of many legendary performers to come out of the powerhouse that was Sun Records. In a conversation with Wink Martindale, Orbison discusses how he got his start with Sun and its founder Sam Phillips. Orbison continues to discuss his hectic early days of touring where he would perform anywhere and everywhere including drive-in theaters and backs of flatbed trucks. Orbison continues to elaborate on those thrilling beginnings and the journey to his later success with Monument...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Rosemary Clooney grew up singing with her sister at family gatherings and in her senior year of high school they were hired to sing at the local radio station. She soared to fame in the 1950s with the novelty song "Come On-a My House" and continued to release a number of other pop and jazz hits. In 1973, Clooney sat down with Wink Martindale to provide an intimate look at her early personal life and legendary musical career. Beyond her work as just a singer, she starred in the movie White Christmas with Bing Crosby, appeared with him on television, and the two recorded duets...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Roger Williams stood alone in the world of popular music. He was just three years old when he first sat in front of a piano and played a song. He went on to study piano at Drake University and Julliard and had his first success with the single “Autumn Leaves.” Williams sat down for a conversation with Wink Martindale in 1972 to discuss his career and passion for playing music. He talks about his early life and musical journey, the importance of hard work and practice and the toll life on the road...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II joined forces to create the most consistently successful partnership in the American theater. Included among the seemingly endless list of their work are legendary works such as Oklahoma!, South Pacific, The King & I, The Sound of Music and many more. In the first part of this two-part series exploring their groundbreaking career, Wink Martindale speaks with the duo to explore the early days of their partnership. Many of their contemporaries also provide thoughts and discussion on the pair’s work and the lasting effect they had on the world of...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    The second part of our Hall of Fame spotlight on Rodgers and Hammerstein details the phenomenal success Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II had as partners after joining forces in 1943. Throughout their long career in theater, the pair helped to start the careers of many now famous singers, dancers and musicians. Narrator Wink Martindale interviewed the duo, who shared many details of their professional life. Hammerstein reveals his approach to writing and discusses his work on South Pacific, which broke new ground in musical theater. Rodgers explains how he uses the characters to understand what the mood of the music should sound...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Roberta Flack gained national recognition with her song "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" from the movie Play Misty for Me. The singer, songwriter and musician performed a wide variety of music including jazz, classical, folk, soul, pop and R&B. She was the first to win the Grammy Award for Record of the Year in two consecutive years. Flack takes pride in being an accomplished artist and a shrewd business woman. Wink Martindale speaks with Flack and provides a comprehensive overview of Flack's numerous accomplishments and successful...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Ray Conniff got his start arranging and conducting for other recording artists. His success working for others eventually led to Columbia allowing him to record an album under his own name which was released to great success and acclaim. Conniff was the first artist to use voices and vocal arrangements as part of the instrumentation. In a conversation with host Wink Martindale, Conniff discusses his unique sound, evolving his style and his passion for creating...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Ray Charles lived his life with no regrets, no matter the ups or the downs. After losing his sight at 7 years old, and his parents passing away while he was a teenager, he went on to experience phenomenal success as a singer, songwriter and musician. Charles didn't often agree to interviews, but in this rare and lengthy conversation he had with Wink Martindale in 1970 he offered an introspective look at his personal life and storied career. He reflects on his musical influences, his development as an artist and his continued love of...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    For his fifth birthday, Ray Anthony's father bought him a trumpet. It wasn't until the age of 12 when his trumpet was hidden as a punishment that he realized he couldn't live without it. Anthony opened up to Wink Martindale in this interview from 1978 about joining the Al Donahue Orchestra at the age of 17, getting fired from the Glenn Miller Band and the popularity of the Bunny Hop. He also talks about the sound of Glenn Miller and what makes it so special. Anthony goes on to discuss what it was like starting his own orchestra and having his brother join...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Petula Clark's career began at the young age of nine. She got her start on BBC radio during World War II and in the years to follow she would perform hundreds of times for the troops and become known as "Britain's Shirley Temple." Clark sat down with host Wink Martindale to discuss her exciting musical journey that spanned more than seven decades and included radio, film, television and music. Martindale gives listeners an intimate look at the singer's personal life, family and...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Perry Como’s career started with a dare. The teenage owner of a barbershop had done some singing locally, but when his friends dared him to get on stage and sing a few songs with Freddy Carlone, he was offered a job. Following touring, recording and a brief return to the barber business, Como went on to host his own radio show and sign a recording contract with RCA records where he would sell millions of albums. In the summer of 1977, Wink Martindale sat down for an enthralling conversation with Como to discuss his career that spanned more than half a century across music, radio, film and...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Though his work was often classified as just "arrangements," Percy Faith's work went well beyond that and could be more accurately described as "recompositions." He got his start as a child studying piano and eventually made his mark as an instrumental stylist, importing elements of jazz and rock into mood music. In a conversation with host Wink Martindale, Faith discusses the work it takes to find and keep fans, his lengthy music career and his focus on creating music that makes him happy versus music that might sell...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Norma Deloris Egstrom grew up far away from the big city life where her future would take her. While still a teenager, she left her small town of Jamestown, North Dakota to audition for WDAY in Fargo. An hour later, she found herself on the air and with a brand new name courtesy of radio personality Ken Kennedy – Peggy Lee. The singer, songwriter and actress sat with Wink Martindale in her Hollywood Hills home in 1975 and reflected on the early days of her career, her musical influences and her ability to adapt to new sounds and audiences. Lee passionately discusses her accomplished work as a performer and creator of...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Paul Anka recorded his first single at the age of just 14. In addition to his success as a performer, Anka was also an accomplished songwriter. His credits include the theme song for Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson and one of Tom Jones’ biggest hits, “She’s A Lady.” In this 1977 interview, Wink Martindale takes listeners on an extensive survey of the singer’s long and successful career. From his first taste of fame with the single “Diana” to being one of the first pop singers to play in the Las Vegas casinos, Anka shares engaging stories of his career as an...read more