Searching for: "Wink Martindale"

  • Wink Martindale

    Al Martino's success began in 1952 with the single "Here in My Heart." The self-taught crooner went on to find his biggest success in an unlikely source in 1963 with a version of "I Love You Because," which was originally a country tune. In August of 1972, he sat down for an interview with host Wink Martindale to reflect on his storied career. Martino discusses his early life growing up, some of his musical influences and the highs and lows of his musical...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    For Alan and Marilyn Bergman, being married and working together as songwriters had many perks. The two found that their relationship allowed them to be uninhibited in sharing ideas while crafting a song. In this interview recorded with Wink Martindale in the 1980s, they discussed their lives, lyrics and careers as songwriters. The couple provides an intimate and detailed look at the songwriting process along with sharing interesting stories about some of the songs they've...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    From 1934 to 1951, The Andrews Sisters recorded more than 400 songs, including hits such as "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" and "Rum and Coca Cola," and sold almost 100 million records. Wink Martindale sat down with sisters Patty and Maxine to discuss how they got started and why breaking up was the best thing to happen to them. In this interview from 1972, the sisters share captivating stories about what it was like traveling as a trio, working with Bing Crosby and what they would have done differently had they not been successful in...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Andy Williams got his start doing anonymous voice tracks for movies in the 1940s. He got his start singing at teas with his brother, and then made a move to singing on radio in Des Moines, Iowa and Chicago. Finally, Williams found his way to New York where he started to really focus on his singing career. Television played an instrumental role in Williams’ success. His big breakthrough came as a singer on The Tonight Show starring Steve Allen. In February of 1973, he sat down with Wink Martindale to take a look back at his career. Williams discusses his early life, his work in television and fruitful...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    The Beach Boys started in the Wilsons' garage with members Brian, Dennis and Carl Wilson, their cousin Mike Love and friend Al Jardine. Their first hit was in 1962 and was considered a "surf" song that had distinct vocal harmonies. History will show the progression of the Beach Boys songs that permeated the culture of the day. The harmonies, melodies and arrangements provided a new soundtrack in the culture of the 60s, 70s, 80s and into the new millennium. Wink Martindale sat down with the band as they reflect on their music and its lasting...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    In February 1964, The Beatles made their TV debut on the Ed Sullivan Show, catching the attention of Bob Eubanks. Wink Martindale catches up with Eubanks in an interview from 1977 about The Beatles playing the Hollywood Bowl. He discusses having second thoughts about booking them for the concert and then selling out in 3.5 hours. He explains how increasingly more difficult it became over the years to sneak The Beatles out of the venue. Eubanks talks about how he believes The Beatles will always be popular and how proud he is to have been a part of their...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Billy Eckstine didn't consider singing a potential profession until he earned $5 as second prize in an amateur competition. He was bit by the showbiz bug after working as an MC and singer in his hometown of Pittsburgh while on summer break from college. He decided not to return to college and eventually began working in clubs throughout Buffalo, New York; Detroit and Chicago. Eckstine sat down with Wink Martindale for an interview in May of 1973. He discusses the early days of his career, his recordings, live performances and love for what he does to make a living in this fascinating...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Bobby Goldsboro describes the first song he ever wrote with a laugh as "one of the worst you've ever heard." Though those first attempts at songwriting weren't exactly successful, he went on to enjoy a wildly successful career including the chart-topping hit "Honey," which sold more than a million copies in the United States. In the height of his popularity in 1973, Goldsboro sat down with Wink Martindale to discuss his wildly successful career that included 16 top 40 hits on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and 12 on the country chart with singles like "See the Funny Little Clown" and "Summer (The First Time)." He reflects on how his songwriting has changed over the years, what influences...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Bobby Vinton, "The Most Successful Unknown," says he never wanted to be a musician; he wanted to be a football player instead. In fact, his parents would bribe him 25 cents an hour just to get him to practice his clarinet. Vinton sat down with Wink Martindale in 1973 to discuss his success with "Blue on Blue" and the story behind "Roses are Red." He says writing songs is difficult and he isn't sure who is buying his albums. Vinton also discusses putting together a pop music band in high school and how he began his acting...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Brenda Lee’s astoundingly successful career began at the early age of three, when she won a singing contest. At the age of 15 her career was well underway, drawing comparisons to the legendary Judy Garland and accumulating fans all over the world. She is perhaps best known for her 1960s single, “I’m Sorry,” which she recorded at the age of just 14. Lee sat down with host Wink Martindale to discuss her captivating musical career. She speaks about her roots in gospel music, her many hit singles and her deep love of...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    In 1973, Captain & Tennille wrote and cut a record completely at their own expense. The product of that recording session, “The Way I Want to Touch You,” proved to be a regional hit and was the first step in their fascinating journey to major label success. The couple sat down with host Wink Martindale just as their first hit was climbing the charts. In this captivating interview, they discuss how they got started in music, the creation of their first album and their love of performing. Captain & Tennille put a tremendous amount of thought and emotion in not only their music, but their entire...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    While some would contend that Carly Simon's wealthy background gave her a leg up, her talent and skill as a musician make it clear that she earned every bit of her current and future success on her own. Her first break came while she was on vacation. She and her sister Lucy took a trip to Cape Cod and tried to get a job performing in a summer resort. As luck would have it the previous performer had left, so they started singing there with a repertoire of three songs. The duo continued to perform before eventually disbanding and Carly began performing as a solo artist. In June of 1971, she sat down with Wink Martindale for a detailed conversation about her life, career and passion for...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Dick Clark had taken over for a TV show that served as "filler" and showcased different musical acts. Young girls were invited to watch as the studio audience, but when they got bored they got up to dance and a camera man caught the moment. From that moment, American Bandstand was born. For teenagers, American Bandstand served as a replacement for hanging out at the local soda shop and listening to the jukebox with friends. Every episode showcased new music, fashion and dance moves. In this 1974 interview, Wink Martindale sits down with Clark to discuss the early years of the...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Eddy Arnold dominated popular and country music from the late 40s to the 60s, despite changing tastes over those two eventful decades. In a conversation with host Wink Martindale, Arnold recounts his early life as a farm boy that earned him the nickname “The Tennessee Ploughboy” and his eventual rise to arguably become the king of country. Arnold continues to discuss his work as a musician, his leap from country to pop and the struggles and triumphs of his career and personal...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Ella Fitzgerald’s career began at various amateur nights around New York City, most famously at the Apollo Theater in 1934. From those early days, Fitzgerald grew to be an iconic jazz singer and the First Lady of Song. In the spring of 1983, Fitzgerald sat down for a conversation with Wink Martindale. She discusses how her career began and some of her first hits including “A-Tistket, A-Tasket.” We also hear about some artists she’s a fan of and hear from musicians who cite her as an...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    We begin our exploration of the career of Elvis Presley, which found him recording for the now world-famous Sun Records with producer Sam Phillips in 1954. Only a few short years later, he would shift to RCA Records, releasing his first single for the label, “Heartbreak Hotel,” in January of 1956. As host Wink Martindale recalls, “Presleymania” was in full swing by 1957. Longtime Presley associates Carl Perkins, Scotty Moore, Ray Walker and Gordon Stoker are just a few of the names who join Wink to share their memories of those early days of Presley’s career -- including his first TV appearances on Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, Steve Allen, Ed Sullivan and his first recorded television...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    We continue our exploration of the career of Elvis Presley with the second installment of this three part series. Presley would face both happy times and challenging moments as his popularity continued to grow. He went Hollywood and added “movie star” to his resume, but he also got drafted in 1958 and that same year, faced the death of his beloved mother. Presley and his associates -- including longtime drummer DJ Fontana and Nancy Sinatra -- share their memories of the era with host Wink Martindale. It was a time which found Elvis’ manager, Colonel Parker, processing up to 30 thousand fan letters a month and supervising activities of a reported 5,000 fan clubs around the world....read more

  • Wink Martindale

    Our third and final installment of a three part exploration of the career of Elvis Presley takes a look at the final years for the legendary singer who we first became aware of in 1954 when he released his first single “That’s Alright Mama” on Sun Records. That first single marked the beginning of an astonishing career during which he rose to become the most famous rock and roll star in the world. Friends and associates share their memories of the Elvis that they knew in those years with host Wink Martindale and we hear from Presley himself, who takes a look at his own career. Eventually the world would say goodbye to Presley in August of 1977 when he passed away. His legacy...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    "It's a Blue World" brought The Four Freshmen onto the charts and into the spotlight in 1952. In the years that followed, the band went through numerous lineup changes but never lost the sound that made them famous. Wink Martindale spoke with original members Bob Flanigan and Ross Barbour in 1973 about their career and the lasting influence they had on musical acts that followed. The fascinating discussion includes colorful stories from the band's difficult early years as they struggled to tour with their families and make enough money to keep making the music they...read more

  • Wink Martindale

    The second part of our Hall of Fame spotlight on Frank Sinatra’s legendary career features more audio interviews and highlights from Sinatra and the friends and family who knew him best -- including John F. Kennedy, Paul Anka and songwriter Sammy Cahn, among others. Host Wink Martindale explores the stories behind some of the classic songs in the Sinatra catalog, including “Three Coins In The Fountain,” a hit record for Sinatra that went to the top of the charts in the U.K. in 1954. In that same year, the Four Aces and Dinah Shore would also record their own very successful versions of the track. Hear the fascinating story of how the song that Sinatra thought was only a demo...read more