Searching for: "A Full Cast"

  • Louis L'amour

    In a short story from Bowdrie's Law, Bowdrie is determined to avenge the death of a friend, even after he is shot and left for...read more

  • Louis L'amour

    McQueen of the Tumbling K Ranch foreman Ward McQueen recognizes trouble when he sees it-and trouble is what the Texan sees when he spies the tracks of a wounded man in the middle of the big Tumbling K spread. In town, he learns that a tinhorn gambler has just won the ranch next to the Tumbling K in a dirty card game--and is turning his oily gaze toward the K's pretty owner, Miss Ruth Kermitt. Sure as shooting, McQueen knows the shifty-eyed parlor snake has something to do with the tracks, but before he can prove it to Ruth Kermitt. McQueen finds himself ambushed, dry-gulched, and left in a shallow grave to...read more

  • Louis L'amour

    Banker Tom Lindsay made a bad decision when he decided to do business with Ross Yerby. Yerby convinced Tom to print a few extra greenbacks to help him trade some cattle in exchange for half the profit. What Tom hadn't figured into the equation was Ross losing the money, and returning -- desperate -- for more. An argument between the two men goes bad, Lindsay is killed, and Yerby flees with a bundle of Lindsay's cash in tow. With no witnesses to the robbery turned murder, the first accusing finger is pointed at Lindsay's assistant Bill Culver, who's conveniently absent when Lindsay's body is discovered. But Texas Ranger Chick Bowdrie, who's just arrived in town on a different matter,...read more

  • Louis L'amour

    Rain on the Mountain Fork Lawman, manhunter, peacemaker–it takes a hard breed of man to survive as a Texas Ranger, but Chick Bowdrie stands head and shoulders above the rest. The rough trails are his home, from the Big Thicket to the Pecos to the border. He's dried by the desert sun and wind, scarred and toughened by uncounted gun battles, and when you look into his black eyes, it's like looking down the barrels of two .44s with their hammers drawn back. He rides in the name of justice, but he lives by his own law–Bowdrie's Law. And if you're thinking about walking on the wrong side of Bowdrie's Law, you'd better start running. ...read more

  • H.P. Lovecraft

    The only audio edition of Eldritch Tales authorized by the H. P. Lovecraft Estate! Following the phenomenal success of Necronomicon, itscompanion volume brings together Lovecraft's remaining major stories plus his weirdpoetry, a number of obscure revisions, and some notable nonfiction, includingthe seminal critical essay "Supernatural Horror in Literature." Gathering together in chronological order the rest ofLovecraft's rarely seen but extraordinary short fiction, this collectionincludes the entirety of the long-out-of-print collection of thirty-sixsonnets "Fungi from Yuggoth." Lovecraft died at the age of forty-seven,but in his short life he turned out dozens of stories that changed the...read more

  • A Hollywood 360 Collection

    The Whistlerwas one of radio's top mystery programs airing from May 16, 1942 untilSeptember 22, 1955. The Whistler was an ominous narrator who opened eachepisode with, "I am the Whistler, and I know many things, for I walk bynight. I know many strange tales, many secrets hidden in the hearts of men andwomen who have stepped into the shadows. I know the nameless terrors of whichthey dare not speak." The opening dialog was heard over the echo of footstepsand Wilbur Hatch's haunting signature thirteen-note theme, whistled each weekby Dorothy Roberts. The stories followed an effective formula in which a person'scriminal acts were typically undone by their own missteps. The Whistler...read more

  • A Hollywood 360 Collection

    "Around Dodge Cityand in the territory out West, there's just one way to handle the killers andthe spoilers, and that's with a US marshal and the smell of ... Gunsmoke!" Radio Westerns werestrictly for kids until 1952, when Gunsmokehit the radio airwaves. The stories were grim, the deaths brutal, and life onthe plains was harsh. Radio audiences had never heard anything like Gunsmoke, and they made it the numberone Western on the radio. It soon made a successful transition to television,becoming the longest-running dramatic series in television history. JoinWilliam Conrad (Marshal Matt Dillon), Parley Baer (Deputy ChesterProudfoot), Georgia Ellis (Kitty Russell), and Howard McNear (Doc...read more

  • Hollywood 360

    Created by Blake Edwards, RichardDiamond, Private Detective came to NBC Radio in 1949, starring film actorand crooner Dick Powell. Powell had recently played Philip Marlowe in thepopular RKO film Murder, My Sweet andjumped at the chance to play a suave detective on the radio. Diamond was a lighthearted,New York-based private eye who enjoyed ribbing the cops and singing songs tohis millionaire girlfriend, Helen Asher. Its theme, "Leave It to Love," waswhistled by Powell at the beginning of each episode. Powell's production company, Four Star Television,produced a version of RichardDiamond, Private Detective for CBS in 1957. The lead role went to David Janssen, who would later gain fame as...read more

  • Hollywood 360

    OurMiss Brooks was a highly popular radio sitcom that waseventually adapted for both television and film. It starred Hollywood film andNew York stage veteran Eve Arden, who specialized in playing the wisecrackingfriend. She often did it better than anyone else, receiving an Oscar nominationfor the 1945 film Mildred Pierce. Since her skill with the wicked one-liner was beginning to lead to typecasting, Ardensigned on for the lead in radio's OurMiss Brooks to find a new image. The series centers on Connie Brooks, a sharp-witted,lovable English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Between gentle wisecracks,Miss Brooks dotes on nerdish student Walter Denton, played by Richard Crenna, and...read more

  • Kc Wayland

    The battle has begun. There is no more running awayor trying to hide. The survivors confront their attackers head on, both humanand otherwise. As the mystery starts to unravel surrounding the man in thepin-striped suit, can our heroes stop him in time? We'reAlive: A Story of Survival, the Fourth Season, the finalseason, features twelve chapters packed with performances and sound effectsthat rival movies and prove that modern audio drama is undead and well. Joinour survivors as they band together and discover that zombies are far from theworst thing in a postapocalyptic world where the rules of human decency nolonger apply. Little food, little water, little hope-who is luckyenough to say,...read more

  • Various Authors

    A chilling reenactment of the federal government’s anti-Communist investigations. The testimony that the author has gleaned for this book from the thirty-year record of the House Un-American Activities Committee focuses on HUAC’s treatment of artists, intellectuals, and performers. This highly readable and absorbing collection of significant excerpts from the hearings shows with painful clarity how HUAC grew from a panel that investigated possible subversive activities in a “dignified” manner to a huge, unrelenting accusatory finger from which almost no one was safe. Thirty Years of Treason serves as a warning for the future and creates living history from the documentary...read more

  • Hollywood 360

    Conceived as a potential radio vehicle for AlfredHitchcock to direct, Suspense was aradio series of epic proportion. It aired on CBS from 1942 to 1962 and isconsidered by many to be the best mystery drama series of the golden age. Oftenreferred to as "Radio's Outstanding Theater of Thrills," it focused onsuspenseful thrillers starring the biggest names in Hollywood. Early in therun, the episodes were hosted by the "Man in Black" who, from an omniscientperch, narrated stories of people thrown into dangerous or bizarre situationswith plots that usually had an unseen twist or two at the very end.Hollywood's finest actors jumped at the chance to appear on Suspense, including Cary Grant,...read more

  • Patricia C. Wrede

    “Mother taught me to be polite to dragons.” Daystar never thought he’d be walking through the Enchanted Forest with a magic sword, a fire-witch, and a baby dragon. He never dreamed his mother, Cimorene, would tell him to leave their home and not to return until his task was complete. Or that he alone held the power to release King Mendanbar and the Enchanted Forest from the wizards’ evil spell. He doesn’t even know who King Mendanbar is. But Daystar learns quickly—and that’s good, because he’s about to encounter magic and wizards and dragons. Quite a deadly...read more

  • Paul Fleischman

    Assigned to write an autobiography, high-school senior Robert Radkovitz instead creates a sound portrait of his life as he remembers it. Looking back, he hears his mother's singing, his grandmother's mysteries, Mexican soap operas, Poe, poetry, and, most cherished, the voice of his absent father from a single tape of one of his radio shows. Told in a collage of voices, Seek describes Rob's search for his father, a search pursued not through San Francisco's streets, but through the labyrinth of the airwaves. Psychic readers, baseball announcers, pirate DJs, friends, and teachers join a rich, ringing aural autobiography that's as joyfully comic as it is...read more

  • Hollywood 360

    Created by Irving Brecher, The Life of Riley starred William Bendix as Brooklyn-born Chester A. Riley, a family man who worked as a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California. The stories were usually set at home, where Riley would cheerfully disrupt life with his malapropisms and ill-timed intervention into minor problems. His stock answer to every turn of fate became a popular catch phrase: “What a revoltin’ development this is!” Trouble usually arose when Riley received bad information from his coworker, Jim Gillis. The program aired on radio from 1944 until 1951, making a successful transition to television in 1949. Due to a contract dispute, Bendix...read more

  • Hollywood 360

    The Whistlerwas one of radio's top mystery programs airing from May 16, 1942 untilSeptember 22, 1955. The Whistler was an ominous narrator who opened eachepisode with, "I am the Whistler, and I know many things, for I walk bynight. I know many strange tales, many secrets hidden in the hearts of men andwomen who have stepped into the shadows. I know the nameless terrors of whichthey dare not speak." The opening dialog was heard over the echo of footstepsand Wilbur Hatch's haunting signature thirteen-note theme, whistled each weekby Dorothy Roberts. The stories followed an effective formula in which a person'scriminal acts were typically undone by their own missteps. The Whistler...read more

  • Hollywood 360

    The Falcon radio series aired from 1943 until 1954. "The Falcon" was an alternate identity for detective Michael Waring. Like the Falcon movies, the radio plots mixed danger, romance, and comedy in equal parts. Each show began with a telephone ringing and Michael Waring, the Falcon, answering the phone. Speaking with a woman whose voice was never heard, Waring would explain that he had an urgent situation he had to deal with. This led into the standard opening, followed by the week's tale of adventure. Often, incompetent police were unable to solve the mysteries without his help. Waring was billed on radio as a freelance detective who was "always ready with a hand for oppressed men and...read more

  • Hollywood 360

    Our Miss Brooks was a situation comedy show heard on radio and seen on television and films starring Oscar winner Eve Arden. Her skill with the wicked one-liner and acid aside had begun to lead to typecasting so, to find a new image, Arden signed on for the lead in radio's Our Miss Brooks. The series centered on Connie Brooks, a smart, sharp-witted, lovable English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Between gentle wisecracks, Miss Brooks doted on nerdish student Walter Denton and frequently locked horns with crusty, cranky Principal Osgood Conklin. Many plot lines revolved around Miss Brooks' longing for Philip Boynton, the school's bashful biology teacher. Our Miss Brooks made a...read more

  • Hollywood 360

    "Countdown for blastoff ... X minus five, four, three, two, X minus one ... Fire! From the far horizons of the unknown come transcribed tales of new dimensions in time and space. These are stories of the future; adventures in which you'll live in a million could-be years on a thousand may-be worlds." Thus began each episode of X minus One, a half-hour science fiction radio series which was broadcast from 1955 until 1958. Initially a revival of NBC's Dimension X, the first fifteen episodes were new versions of Dimension X episodes, but the remainder were adaptations by NBC staff writers of newly published science fiction stories by leading writers in the field, including Isaac Asimov, Ray...read more

  • Hollywood 360

    Rogue's Gallery was an old-time radio program starring Dick Powell as Richard Rogue, a private detective who trailed luscious blondes, protected witnesses, and did whatever else detectives do to make a living. What set this show apart from others in the genre was that midway through every episode, Rogue would invariably end up getting knocked out and spending his dream-time in acerbic conversation on Cloud 8 with his subconscious self-named Eugor-"Rogue" spelled backwards. The presence of the alter ego served to give Rogue enough information for his final deduction. Eugor would appear cackling like the host of The Hermit's Cave while imparting some vital information our hero had overlooked....read more