Searching for: "Andrea Giordani"

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    The fate of a young university student, an amoral scientist, and his beautiful daughter clash in this Gothic tale of science and control. All the young men in Padua, Italy have fallen for Beatrice, who tends the exotic plants in her father's garden. Giovanni makes his way into the garden and Beatrice's heart, but the joy of young love shatters when he uncovers a terrible secret about her father's work. This twisted gothic story presents powerful literary themes with the thrill of...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    Aylmer has a great career as a scientist and a beautiful new wife, Georgiana. There’s only one problem—Georgiana has a small red birthmark on her cheek. Aylmer grows increasingly disgusted with the birthmark and becomes obsessed with removing the one thing barring his wife from perfection. With “The Birthmark,” Hawthorne crafted a tale of tragic irony and dangerous obsession to rival Poe’s “The Tell-Tale...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    In this classic tale, the young Puritan Goodman Brown heads into the woods for a meeting with the devil. His world turns on its head, however, when he sees who else has gathered for the satanic ceremony. This one evening will forever mar how he sees his neighbors, his family, and himself. See for yourself why Hawthorne’s chilling allegory for Puritan culture and the loss of innocence has become a staple of early American...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

     This tale follows eight individuals all searching for the Great Carbuncle, a legendary red gemstone. These wildly disparate individuals camp together one night in the White Mountains, united by their shared desire for the stone. Each wants it for a different reason, though: fulfilment, knowledge, wealth, skepticism, inspiration, posterity, utility. The next morning, they all part ways to continue their quest, but who will be the first to the...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    A brutal winter storm sweeps through the mountains of New England, forcing a young man to seek shelter. A kind family welcomes him into their humble home, tucked away in a remote mountain pass. The traveler is the story’s eponymous “Ambitious Guest,” as he tells the family about his aspiration to make a mark on the world. The evening takes an ironic turn, however, when an avalanche heads straight for the house in this story based on the real-life Willey Family...read more

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    Complete with seven short stories, this is the definitive anthology for Nathaniel Hawthorne fans. Hawthorne’s dark romanticism and cultural commentary made him a staple of nineteenth-century American literature. Dive into the works that made him famoua, such as the chilling “Young Goodman Brown”. Hawthorne delved deep into the human soul with his work, and now you can delve deep into his soul with this...read more

  • Stanley Lane-Poole

    The Alhambra in Granada, the Mosque in Cordova—these are some of the magnificent physical remnants of Moorish rule in Spain. Their influence on culture, engineering, and civilization has also remained in ways often unacknowledged. Lane-Poole was the first to publish a scholarly history in English about a non-Christian civilization, making this a ground-breaking work. Written with extensive knowledge, wit, and admiration, Lane-Poole’s The Moors in Spain is not to be...read more

  • Emmeline Pankhurst

    Emmeline Pankhurst was to women’s suffrage in England what Susan B. Anthony was for the same cause in America. She gave this memorable speech while campaigning in the US. In it, she explains the root trouble women face when campaigning for their rights: “We women, in trying to make our case clear, always have to make as part of our argument, and urge upon men in our audience the fact—a very simple fact—that women are human beings.” Though she faced harsh criticism for her “militant” means of advocacy, she never backed down, and as a result, gained suffrage in her...read more

  • Arthur Machen

    Arthur Machen’s novella explores the disturbing consequences of toying with the line between the earthly world and the spiritual realm. The Great God Pan centers around an ominous woman named Helen, who lives in the woods and invites morbid happenings. The book faced harsh censure upon its publication in 1894 for its explicit content, but today it is considered a hallmark of horror fiction. Stephen King himself called it “one of the best horror stories ever written,” making it essential reading for any dedicated fans of the...read more

  • Cabeza de Vaca

    Cabeza de Vaca left Spain to explore the New World on a 1527 expedition. He was second in command of nearly 600 men, but only he and three others survived the treacherous weather, exotic diseases, and attacking indigenous people. Cabeza de Vaca survived eight straight years of wandering through the America’s southwest by becoming a medicine man to the natives. In the events of this memoir, he recounts how he helped resuscitate a man, and suddenly “all over the land nothing else was spoken...read more

  • Plutarch

    The story of Romulus is perhaps the most noteworthy entry in Plutarch’s Parallel Lives. According to legend, Romulus and his brother Remus founded Rome after being raised by a “she-wolf,” though Plutarch notes that this word was also used to describe sexually immoral women. “The Life of Romulus” shows how it is impossible to separate the man from the myth. For this reason, Plutarch’s portrait of Romulus argues that legends often have as great an influence on culture as the...read more

  • Plutarch

    Cato the Elder rose from his Plebeian ancestry to become a great Roman senator, orator, and historian. While he was the first in his family to hold elected office, Cato proudly declared that his military roots made bravery a family trait. Plutarch praises him for his actions as a father, his strength as an orator, and his wise ethics, but he criticizes his behavior toward animals and slaves. While there are several historical biographies of what Cato did, this entry in Parallel Lives creates an intimate portrait of who Cato was in character and in...read more

  • Plutarch

    In “The Life of Cicero,” Plutarch details the priceless contributions Cicero made to Roman society. He translated the works of Greek philosophers into Latin, gained acclaim as an orator and lawyer, and was elected to office. Politics ultimately got the better of him, however, and his life ended in assassination while in exile. Cicero’s ideas live on through his body of work, but to learn about the man himself, Plutarch’s biography is an excellent starting...read more

  • Plutarch

    The Roman statesman Sulla had the nickname “Felix,” meaning “lucky.” Yet his accomplishments were more a matter of brute force than good fortune. He put an end to a civil war, declared himself dictator, and used his power to bring Rome back to its former value system, purging thousands of Roman enemies along the way. Plutarch’s biography of Sulla shows how one man’s use of force to obtain political power influenced many who came after him, most notably Julius...read more

  • Plutarch

    The Romans hated Pompey’s greedy father, Strabo, with a vengeance. Yet when Pompey rose in prominence, Plutarch notes that he developed the opposite character, and the Romans loved him for it. Pompey had many great accomplishments in his military and political life, but his legacy lies in forming the First Triumvirate with Crassus and Caesar. When the alliance eventually dissolved, and Pompey fled from Caesar to his death, the Roman world would never be the...read more

  • Plutarch

    Mark Antony’s personal life was almost as storied as his immensely successful political career. In Plutarch’s biography, the most striking sections revolve around Antony’s relationship with Cleopatra. Plutarch’s characterization inspired Shakespeare, whose play Antony and Cleopatra would not be the same without its influence. With such close ties to Shakespeare, it’s no wonder that the “The Life of Antony” holds great literary merit all its...read more

  • Plutarch

    Athenian politician Solon made a name for himself as a reformer and poet. Unfortunately, little of his work survives today. Plutarch’s biography serves as a leading resource on his life, even though it was written hundreds of years after Solon’s death. In his lifetime, Solon drove political efforts to preserve Greek morality, economy, and politics, laying the groundwork for Athenian democracy as we know...read more

  • Plutarch

    Alcibiades was a powerful man who made powerful enemies. Within a single war, his loyalties changed multiple times as he fled one enemy after another, bringing his unorthodox tactics to every strategic position he held. This charismatic, self-interested leader inspired admiration and hate in near equal measure. His complex character avoids simplification, so Plutarch skillfully portrays him as the multi-faceted man he was, leaving readers to make their own...read more

  • Plutarch

    Born into a royal household, Pyrrhus was destined for greatness. He fought in many battles throughout his life, but his campaigns against Rome established his reputation as a commander. Many of his victories were only achieved through heavy losses, however, which is where the term “Pyrrhic victory” comes from. From this dramatic account of Pyrrhus’ life, it’s easy to see why his contemporaries considered his valor...read more

  • Plutarch

    Plutarch begins this biography by stating, “Concerning Lycurgus the lawgiver, in general, nothing can be said which is not disputed.” What he recorded captures the essence of Lycurgus and his legacy, if not the unquestionable truth. The great lawgiver founded Sparta after consulting the Oracle of Delphi, and his laws established a totalitarian society that flourished for five hundred years. With this kind of unprecedented success, it is no wonder the man’s legacy became entangled in myths surrounding how he did...read more