Searching for: "Brian Morris"

  • Brian Morris

    tactics are used by people around us every day to manipulate, coerce, and influence us to get what they want. Are you using them? Dream psychology is the art and science of manipulation and mind control. While psychology is the study of human behavior and is central to our thoughts, actions, and interactions, the term dark psychology is the phenomenon by which people use tactics of motivation, persuasion, manipulation, and coercion to get what they...read more

  • Charles Darwin

    Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species, in which he writes of his theories of evolution by natural selection, is one of the most important works of scientific study ever...read more

  • Marcus Aurelius

    Meditations is former US President Bill Clinton's favorite book. This audio consists of a series of personal writings by Marcus Aurelius, Roman Emperor AD 161-180, setting forth his ideas on Stoic...read more

  • Dante Alighieri

    Dante Alighieri's poetic masterpiece, The Divine Comedy, is a moving human drama, an unforgettable visionary journey through the infinite torment of Hell, up the arduous slopes of Purgatory, and on to the glorious realm of Paradise-the sphere of universal harmony and eternal...read more

  • Bram Stoker

    Dracula is an 1897 novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, featuring as its primary antagonist the vampire Count Dracula. Dracula has been attributed to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, the gothic novel and invasion literature. Structurally it is an epistolary novel, that is, told as a series of diary entries and letters. Literary critics have examined many themes in the novel, such as the role of women in Victorian culture, conventional and conservative sexuality, immigration, colonialism, postcolonialism and folklore. Although Stoker did not invent the vampire, the novel's influence on the popularity of vampires has been singularly responsible for many...read more

  • Charlotte Brontë

    Jane Eyre, the story of a young girl and her passage into adulthood, was an immediate commercial success at the time of its original publication in 1847. Its representation of the underside of domestic life and the hypocrisy behind religious enthusiasm drew both praise and bitter criticism, while Charlotte Brontë's striking expose of poor living conditions for children in charity schools as well as her poignant portrayal of the limitations faced by women who worked as governesses sparked great controversy and social...read more

  • John Bunyan

    The Pilgrim's Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come is a Christian allegory written by John Bunyan and published in February, 1678. It is regarded as one of the most significant works of English literature, has been translated into more than 200 languages, and has never been out of...read more

  • Robert Louis Stevenson

    Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is a novella written by the Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson and first published in 1886. It is about a London lawyer who investigates strange occurrences between his old friend, Dr Henry Jekyll, and the misanthropic Edward Hyde. The work is known for its vivid portrayal of a split personality, split in the sense that within the same person there is both an apparently good and an evil personality each being quite distinct from each other; in mainstream culture the very phrase 'Jekyll and Hyde' has come to mean a person who is vastly different in moral character from one situation to the...read more

  • Rudyard Kipling

    The Jungle Book (1894) is one of the most popular children's books of all time and a classic of modern literature. The story is set in the forests of India and was originally written by Kipling when he lived in India. The most famous of these stories is the story of Mowgli, a man-cub raised by wolves in the jungle by a...read more

  • Yei Theodora Ozaki

    This collection of Japanese fairy tales translated by Yei Theodora Ozaki, including 'My Lord Bag of Rice', 'The Tongue-Cut Sparrow', 'The Story of Urashima Taro, the Fisher Lad', and...read more

  • David Hume

    Published in 1748, An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding is Scottish empiricist philosopher David Hume's distillation of his mature philosophy. Addressing themes including the limits of human understanding, the compatibility of free will with determinism, weaknesses in the foundations of religion, and the appeal of skepticism, Controversial and widely debated since its publication, An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding is a classic of empiricist philosophy whose questions remain as relevant today as...read more

  • Laozi

    The Tao Te Ching is fundamental to the Taoist school of Chinese philosophy and strongly influenced other schools, such as Legalism and Neo-Confucianism. This ancient book is also central in Chinese religion, not only for Taoism but Chinese Buddhism, which when first introduced into China was largely interpreted through the use of Taoist words and concepts. This title was published in 600 BC and translated by James...read more

  • Jane Austen

    Elinor and Marianne are two daughters of Mr. Dashwood by his second wife. They have a younger sister, Margaret, and an older half-brother named John. When their father dies, the family estate passes to John and the Dashwood women are left in reduced circumstances. Fortunately, a distant relative offers to rent the women a cottage on his property. The novel follows the Dashwood sisters to their new home, where they experience both romance and...read more

  • Louisa May Alcott

    Written and published in two parts in 1868 and 1869, the novel follows the lives of four sisters — Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy March — and is loosely based on the author's childhood experiences with her three...read more

  • Voltaire

    Candide is the story of a gentle man who, though pummeled and slapped in every direction by fate, clings desperately to the belief that he lives in 'the best of all possible worlds.' On the surface a witty, bantering tale, this eighteenth-century classic is actually a savage, satiric thrust at the philosophical optimism that proclaims that all disaster and human suffering is part of a benevolent cosmic plan. Fast, funny, often outrageous, the French philosopher's immortal narrative takes Candide around the world to discover that -- contrary to the teachings of his distringuished tutor Dr. Pangloss -- all is not always for the best. Alive with wit, brilliance, and graceful storytelling,...read more

  • Ulysses S. Grant

    Completed a short time before his death in 1885, the Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant is recognized today as one of the most significant American military memoirs of all time. In an honest and intelligent voice, the celebrated Civil War general and former President offers a detailed and intimate telling of the events of the Mexican-American war, and the American Civil War and his role within it as a Union...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    The moving abolitionist novel that fueled the fire of the human rights debate in 1852 and melodramatically condemned the institution of slavery through powerfully realized...read more

  • Homer

    The Odyssey is an epic poem, written by the ancient Greek Philosopher Homer, and is considered to be the second oldest piece of western literature still in existence. Scholars believe it was written at the end of the 8th century BC. Still heavily used in schools because of its unique literary makeup and historical value, the poems follow Greek hero Odysseus, as he journeys home after the ten year long Trojan War. His journey home takes another ten years, and Odysseus encounters many obstacles including adverse weather, mythical beasts, and angry gods. Many Scholars believe the Odyssey was originally composed in an oral tradition, intended to be heard, not read, making this epic classic a...read more

  • J. M Barrie

    James Matthew Barrie's 'Peter Pan' is considered one of the greatest fantasy tales ever written. It is the story of a boy who wouldn't grow up. Follow Peter Pan with Wendy to Neverland and share in their adventures with the lost boys, Tinker Bell and the evil Captain...read more

  • Upton Sinclair

    One of the most powerful, provocative and enduring novels to expose social injustice ever published in the United States. Upton Sinclair's dramatic and deeply moving story exposed the brutal conditions in the Chicago stockyards at the turn of the nineteenth century and brought into sharp moral focus the appalling odds against which immigrants and other working people struggled for their share of the American...read more