Searching for: "Cameron Stewart"

  • Antony Beevor

    Penguin presents the unabridged, downloadable audiobook edition of D-Day: The Battle for Normandy by Antony Beevor, read by Cameron Stewart. Reissued, with a new foreword, for the 70th Anniversary. Antony Beevor's D-Day: The Battle for Normandy is the closest you will ever get to war - the taste, the smell, the noise and the fear. The Normandy Landings that took place on D-Day involved by far the largest invasion fleet ever known. The scale of the undertaking was simply awesome. What followed them was some of the most cunning and ferocious fighting of the war, at times as savage as anything seen on the Eastern Front. As casualties mounted, so too did the tensions between the...read more

  • Antony Beevor

    'Glorious, horrifying...D-Day is a vibrant work of history that honors the sacrifice of tens of thousands of men and women.'—Time Beevor's Ardennes 1944: The Battle of the Bulge is now available from Viking Books  Renowned historian Antony Beevor, the man who 'single-handedly transformed the reputation of military history' (The Guardian) presents the first major account in more than twenty years of the Normandy invasion and the liberation of Paris. This is the first book to describe not only the experiences of the American, British, Canadian, and German soldiers, but also the terrible suffering of the French caught up in the fighting. Beevor draws upon his...read more

  • Tim Harford

    A provocative and lively exploration of the increasingly important world of macroeconomics, by the author of the bestselling The Undercover Economist. Thanks to the worldwide financial upheaval, economics is no longer a topic we can ignore. From politicians to hedge-fund managers to middle-class IRA holders, everyone must pay attention to how and why the global economy works the way it does. Enter Financial Times columnist and bestselling author Tim Harford. In this new book that demystifies macroeconomics, Harford strips away the spin, the hype, and the jargon to reveal the truth about how the world’s economy actually works. With the wit of a raconteur and the clear grasp of an...read more

  • William Shaw

    London, 1968: The body of a teenage girl is found just steps away from the Beatles' Abbey Road recording studio. The police are called to a residential street in St John's Wood where an unidentified young woman has been strangled. Detective Sergeant Cathal Breen believes she may be one of the many Beatles fans who regularly camp outside Abbey Road Studios. With his reputation tarnished by an inexplicable act of cowardice, this is Breen's last chance to prove he's up to the job. Breen is of the generation for whom reaching adulthood meant turning into one's parents and accepting one's place in the world. But the world around him is changing beyond recognition. Nothing illustrates...read more

  • William Shaw

    In Breen and Tozer's London, a battle for the soul of the city is being fought between cops and criminals, the corrupt and the corruptible. London, November 1968. Detective Sergeant Breen has a death threat in his inbox and a mutilated body on his hands. The dead man was the wayward son of a rising politician and everywhere Breen turns to investigate, he finds himself obstructed and increasingly alienated. Breen begins to see that the abuse of power is at every level of society. And when his actions endanger those at the top, he becomes their target. Out in the cold, banished from a corrupt and fracturing system, Breen is finally forced to fight fire with fire. William Shaw paints...read more

  • Geoffrey Chaucer

    Beyond its importance as a literary work of unvarnished genius, Geoffrey Chaucer’s unfinished epic poem is also one of the most beloved works in the English language—and for good reason: it is lively, absorbing, perceptive, and outrageously funny. But despite the brilliance of Chaucer’s work, the continual evolution of our language has rendered his words unfamiliar to many of us. Esteemed poet, translator, and scholar Burton Raffel’s magnificent new unabridged translation brings Chaucer’s poetry back to life, ensuring that none of the original’s wit, wisdom, or humanity is lost to the modern reader. This edition also features an introduction by the widely influential medievalist...read more

  • J.M. Coetzee

    After crossing oceans, a man and a boy arrive in a new land. Here they are each assigned a name and an age, and held in a camp in the desert while they learn Spanish, the language of their new country. As Simón and David they make their way to the relocation centre in the city of Novilla, where officialdom treats them politely but not necessarily helpfully. Simón finds a job in a grain wharf. The work is unfamiliar and backbreaking, but he soon warms to his stevedore comrades, who during breaks conduct philosophical dialogues on the dignity of labour, and generally take him to their hearts. Now he must set about his task of locating the boy’s mother. Though like everyone else who...read more

  • Neil Forsyth

    Cyber hero Bob Servant became a cult classic in the best-selling Delete This At Your Peril. Now this much-anticipated sequel tells the life story of one of Scotland's unsung heroes. From his days in the Merchant Navy to his creation of a window-cleaning round and his time as a cheeseburger magnate, Bob Servant has lived life to its fullest. With touching bravery, he takes the listener on a fearless romp through the hilarious, whimsical and impassioned memories that surely make him the undisputed Hero of...read more

  • J.M. Coetzee

    Brought to you by Penguin. LONGLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2016 Selected as a Book of the Year 2016 in the Observer and Daily Telegraph When you travel across the ocean on a boat, all your memories are washed away and you start a completely new life. That is how it is. There is no before. There is no history. The boat docks at the harbour and we climb down the gangplank and we are plunged into the here and now. Time begins. Davíd is the small boy who is always asking questions. Simón and Inés take care of him in their new town Estrella. He is learning the language; he has begun to make friends. He has the big dog Bolívar to watch over him. But he'll be seven soon and he...read more

  • J.M. Coetzee

    Brought to you by Penguin. A masterful new novel completes an incomparable trilogy from J.M. Coetzee, Nobel laureate and two-times winner of the Booker Prize In The Childhood of Jesus, Simòn found a boy, David, and they began life in a new land, together with a woman named Inès. In The Schooldays of Jesus, the small family searched for a home in which David could thrive. In The Death of Jesus, David, now a tall ten-year-old, is spotted by Julio Fabricante, the director of a local orphanage, playing football with his friends. He shows unusual talent. When David announces that he wants to go and live with Julio and the children in his care, Simòn and Inès are stunned. David is...read more

  • J. M. Coetzee

    A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK OF 2020 After The Childhood of Jesus and The Schooldays of Jesus, the Nobel Prize-winning author completes his haunting trilogy with a new masterwork, The Death of Jesus In Estrella, David has grown to be a tall ten-year-old who is a natural at soccer, and loves kicking a ball around with his friends. His father Simón and Bolívar the dog usually watch while his mother Inés now works in a fashion boutique. David still asks many questions, challenging his parents, and any authority figure in his life. In dancing class at the Academy of Music he dances as he chooses. He refuses to do sums and will not read any books except...read more

  • Ross King

    The bestselling author of Brunelleschi's Dome and Michelangelo and the Pope's Ceiling captures the excitement and spirit of the Renaissance in this chronicle of the life and work of 'the king of the world's booksellers' and the technological disruption that forever changed the ways knowledge spread. The Renaissance in Florence conjures images of beautiful frescoes and elegant buildings—the dazzling handiwork of the city's skilled artists and architects. But equally important for the centuries to follow were geniuses of a different sort: Florence's manuscript hunters, scribes, scholars, and booksellers, who blew the dust off a thousand years of history and, through the discovery and...read more

  • Sophie Gee

    Jane Austen meets Philip Roth in a sexy, sparkling debut novel reconstructing the real-life scandal that inspired Alexander Pope's famous poem 'The Rape of the Lock.' London, 1711. The rich young offspring of the city's fashionable families fill their days with masquerade balls, opera engagements, and clandestine courtships. Leading the pursuit of pleasure are the beautiful Arabella Fermor, with her circle of beaus, and Robert Petre, seventh Baron of Ingatestone, a man-about-town with his choice of mistresses. Small, sickly, and almost penniless, Alexander Pope is peripheral by birth, yet his dazzling wit and ambition gain him unlikely entrance into high society. Privy to every nuance and...read more

  • Susan Hill

    A chilling ghost story from the author of The Woman in Black, set in a crumbling English house The remoter parts of the English Fens areforlorn, lost, and damp even in the height of summer. At Iyot Lock, a largedecaying house, two young cousins, Leonora and Edward, are parked for thesummer with their aging spinster aunt and her cruel housekeeper. At first theunpleasantness and petty meanness appear simply spiteful, calculated to destroyEdward's equanimity. But when the spoiled Leonora is not given the birthdaypresent of a specific dolly that she wants, affairs inexorably take a muchdarker turn with terrifying, life-destroying consequences for...read more

  • Nev Fountain

    Responding to a summons from the Doctor's future self, he and Peri arrive on a sailing ship in 1492, where the crewmen are gripped by superstitious fear. And when they meet the ship's captain, they discover that heroes can sometimes behave...read more

  • W. S. Gilbert

    This is the sweet story of a paralyzed man in Venice, who sees out of his window a young girl across the way. Unbeknownst to her, she brightens his days over the course of several years, and he begins to fall in love with her. One day he throws out a flower into the canal between them to say "good morning" and she responds in kind. They still haven't spoken a word, but his heart is lifted. Until, that is, the young maid grows up and the gondolier boys start calling on...read more

  • Maurice Leblanc

    One of the Extraordinary Adventures of Arsene Lupin, Gentleman Burglar, written by Maurice Leblanc. Often described as a French counterpart to Sherlock Holmes, Lupin is often a force for good, while operating on the wrong side of the...read more

  • Hunter Davies

    Despite the struggle to make ends meet during the tough years of warfare in the 1940s and rationing persisting until the early 1950s, life could still be sweet. Especially if you were a young boy, playing football with your pals, saving up to go to the movies at the weekend, and being captivated by the latest escapade of Dick Barton on the radio. Chocolate might be scarce, and bananas would be a pipe dream, but you could still have fun. In an excellent social memoir from one of the UK's premier columnists over the past five decades, Hunter Davies captures this period beautifully. His memoir of growing up in post-war North of England from 1945 onwards, amid the immense damage wrought by...read more

  • Nick Twyford

    Twisted 50 volume 1 is a deliciously dark slice of contemporary horror literature. Reading it is like attending a late night secret banquet where you know each course will serve up something unexpected, forbidden and unforgettably chilling. Take your private seat now for 50 luscious courses of terror, from 50 of the strongest voices in modern...read more

  • William Shaw

    London, 1968. A young woman is found naked and strangled in an alley in well-to-do St John's Wood. The neighbours would love to pin it on the enigmatic black stranger who has just moved in. Detective Sergeant Cathal Breen is convinced there's more to the case than anyone wants to admit; no-one's listening. In walks WPC Helen Tozer – awkward chatterbox, farmgirl, and the first woman to enter the murder unit – and gives Breen a...read more