Searching for: "David Bernard"

  • Charles River Editors

    As was the case across Africa, the political mood in the Congo colony remained stable until the end of World War II, but in 1947, India achieved independence and triggered a domino effect that led to the rapid decolonization of Africa. The first sub-Saharan territory to win independence was Ghana, which was handed over in 1957, followed in quick succession by the French territories of Guinea, Cameroon, Senegal, Togo and Mali. As far as Belgium was concerned, the writing was on the wall. As civil unrest began to break out in the major cities, and as the countryside became increasingly less secure, the Belgian authorities began to sense the possibility of a civil war, and arrangements were...read more

  • Charles River Editors

    The magnificent monolith the locals call “Uluru,” situated in the heart of Australia, hovers over a patchy bed of desert poplars and spinifex grasslands. The pleasant, but otherwise unexceptional surroundings of the spellbinding sandstone landform only further accentuates its majesty, one that can be appreciated from a variety of angles. To lime-colored budgerigars, mighty brown falcons, passengers in planes and helicopters, and other creatures blessed with the gift of flight, the free-form rock is reminiscent of the fossil of a spiky fish, a misshapen arrowhead, or perhaps a peculiar, ocher-tinged seashell peeking out of the sand. To those gazing upon the natural gem on solid ground,...read more

  • Charles River Editors

    The development of North America as a series of British colonies prior to the end of the 18th century went ahead without any definitive policy in regards to the Native Americans who were impacted, displaced and not infrequently overwhelmed by the process. The vast majority of Native American people continued to live in a state of grace long after the formation of the colonies and did not begin to feel the impact until the expansion west. Likewise, there could never be a coordinated, pan-tribal unity to confront this gathering invasion, since the indigenous population of the land was heterogeneous, speaking some 300 separate languages, and thousands of regional dialects, and very often they...read more

  • Charles River Editors

    The Wright Brothers initially underestimated the difficulties involved in flying, and they were apparently surprised by the fact that so many others were working on solving the “problem of human flight” already. Decades before their own historic plane would end up in the National Air & Space Museum, Wilbur and Orville asked the Smithsonian for reading materials and brushed up on everything from the works of their contemporaries to Leonardo Da Vinci. Undeterred by the work, and the fact that several would-be pioneers died in crashes trying to control gliders, the Wright Brothers tested out gliding at Kitty Hawk in North Carolina for several years, working to perfect pilot control before...read more

  • Charles River Editors

    “As far as cities go, Havana is a festering treasure chest, a primary color...” – Brin-Jonathan Butler, Cuban-Canadian author A trip to Havana, Cuba, otherwise known as the “City of Columns,” tops many bucket lists for good reason. The mere mention of this once-hidden gem of a city, situated on the western part of the largest Caribbean island nation, evokes the breathtaking imagery of sun-soaked streets and sprawling, golden-sand beaches surrounded by twinkling, almost impossibly crystalline waters, reminiscent of pastel sapphires. Nostalgic types are more likely to envision the time capsule-like qualities of Havana, namely the delightful rows of brightly-colored buildings...read more

  • Charles River Editors

    Aircraft appeared in the skies over the battlefields of World War I, but they did not represent a complete novelty in warfare either, at least not during the early months of World War I. While airplanes had never before appeared above the field of war, other aerial vehicles had already been in use for decades, and balloons had carried soldiers above the landscape for centuries to provide a high observation point superior to most geological features. The French used a balloon for this purpose at the Battle of Fleurus in 1794, and by the American Civil War, military hydrogen balloons saw frequent use, filled from wagons generating hydrogen from iron filings and sulfuric acid. The balloonist...read more

  • Charles River Editors

    “We can trace almost all the disasters of English history to the influence of Wales.” - Evelyn Waugh, English novelist Wales is a whimsical country with a powerful, complex, myth-filled and oft disputed history. In 2004, geneticists working with geographers and archaeological colleagues undertook a “People of the British Isle” study. They sought out thousands of volunteers, all four of whose grandparents had been born in the same place, and they analyzed their genetic make-up. “Modern genetic analysis can read the patterns of variation in our complete set of DNA . . . that change subtly over time,” producing a genetic signature that reveals geographical origins. This provides...read more

  • Charles River Editors

    Egypt in the 14th century was a glorious kingdom to behold. Spice merchants from Europe, Asia and Africa sailed up the Nile River to the great port city of Alexandria, carrying riches such as silk, jewels and spices. Cairo, the capital of Egypt, was the greatest city in the Islamic world, with a larger population and more wealth and splendor than any city in Europe. Cairo was a shining pinnacle of cosmopolitan splendor in the medieval world, and besides being a major trading hub, Cairo was famous for its scholars and intellectual class, offering countless academic opportunities for scholars across the Islamic world. The culture of Cairo was dynamic and famous for its wide range of...read more

  • Johnnie Alberts

    Cryptocurrencies are back! After the enormous rise of bitcoin and other coins at the end of 2017, we are looking at an industry that won’t go away. In the summer of 2019, bitcoin rose from 3,000 dollars to around 12,000 dollars. Since then, the other coins have equally risen and dropped, and fluctuating values are now hot and fascinatingly bullish. For those who want to learn more about this crazy, risky but worthy industry of coin trading or passive investing, there is this guide, filled with more information so you can understand what you’re getting yourself into. Doing some research before putting your hard-earned money into something, is mandatory for success in 99% of the cases....read more

  • Charles River Editors

    The Vietnam War could have been called a comedy of errors if the consequences weren’t so deadly and tragic. In 1951, while war was raging in Korea, the United States began signing defense pacts with nations in the Pacific, intending to create alliances that would contain the spread of Communism. As the Korean War was winding down, America joined the Southeast Asia Treaty Organization, pledging to defend several nations in the region from Communist aggression. One of those nations was South Vietnam.  Ripe for the plucking by North Vietnam, the country of South Vietnam found itself in an unenviable position in 1974. American forces rapidly withdrew, leaving only a few advisers and...read more

  • Charles River Editors

    When the American Revolution began, the Continental Army sported numerous volunteers from Ireland, Scotland, virtually every European nation between France and Russia, and men from the northern and southern borders of the European continent. There are good reasons America doesn’t possess a constitutionally-confirmed national language, despite an English-speaking majority; among the early proposals for such a common language, German and French served as contenders, with the latter going on to become Western Europe’s official diplomatic language. Plenty of unusual characters came to the colonies to participate in the war, with many sporting dubious titles such as the Baron de Kalb,...read more

  • Charles River Editors

    In terms of geopolitics, perhaps the most seminal event of the Middle Ages was the successful Ottoman siege of Constantinople in 1453. The city had been an imperial capital as far back as the 4th century, when Constantine the Great shifted the power center of the Roman Empire there, effectively establishing two almost equally powerful halves of antiquity’s greatest empire. Constantinople would continue to serve as the capital of the Byzantine Empire even after the Western half of the Roman Empire collapsed in the late 5th century. Naturally, the Ottoman Empire would also use Constantinople as the capital of its empire after their conquest effectively ended the Byzantine Empire, and thanks...read more

  • Joseph Knox

    Brought to you by Penguin. 'What happens to those girls who go missing? What happens to the Zoe Nolans of the world?' In the early hours of Saturday, December 17th, 2011, Zoe Nolan, a 19-year-old Manchester University student, walked out of a party taking place in the shared accommodation where she had been living for three months. She was never seen again. Blending fact and fiction in his first stand-alone novel, Joseph Knox delivers a thrilling true crime story like no other. © Joseph Knox 2021 (P) Penguin Audio...read more

  • Joseph Knox

    In the early hours of Saturday, December 17, Zoe Nolan walked out of a party in the apartment where she’d been living for three months. She was nineteen and a student at Manchester University. She was never seen again. Seven years after her disappearance, struggling writer Evelyn Mitchell finds herself drawn into the mystery. Through interviews with Zoe’s closest friends and family, she begins piecing together what really happened that night. But where some versions of events overlap, aligning perfectly with one another, others stand in stark contrast, giving rise to troubling inconsistencies. Shaken by revelations of Zoe’s secret life and stalked by a figure from the shadows,...read more