Searching for: "David Shaw Parker"

  • Kevin Crossley-Holland

    Ancient, rich, and strange, this collection of eerie tales from across Britain and Ireland have influenced our culture and the folklore that...read more

  • James Wilde

    Brought to you by Penguin. Bridging the gap between 'Game of Thrones' and Bernard Cornwell comes the third chapter in James Wilde's epic adventure of betrayal, battle and bloodshed . . . For all the darkness in the land, there is hope. And it rests with one man. Lucanus - the one they call the Wolf - is a warrior. He wears the ancient crown of the great war leader, Pendragon, and he wields a sword bestowed upon him by the druids. And he is the guardian of a secret entrusted to him and to protect that secret will demand untold bravery and sacrifice beyond measure - but to lose it would mean the end of everything worth fighting for. Before Camelot. Before Excalibur. Before all you...read more

  • Dk

    Blast off into space and discover the planets in our Solar System and beyond in this jam-packed encyclopedia for children. Learn what living in space is like for an astronaut, then take a whirl around planet Earth and the moon. Then go beyond where any human has gone before, and marvel at the red, rocky landscape of Mars and the truly magnificent icy rings of Saturn. Venture onwards to the farthest depths of the Milky Way Galaxy, and beyond to the biggest and brightest stars light years away. Packed with out-of-this-world information from NASA and ESA missions, kids will explore our Universe as never before. With exclusive interviews coupled with incredible facts, Space A Children's...read more

  • Dk

    Blast off into space and discover the planets in our Solar System and beyond in this jam-packed encyclopedia for children. Learn what living in space is like for an astronaut, then take a whirl around planet Earth and the moon. Then go beyond where any human has gone before, and marvel at the red, rocky landscape of Mars and the truly magnificent icy rings of Saturn. Venture onwards to the farthest depths of the Milky Way Galaxy, and beyond to the biggest and brightest stars light years away. Packed with out-of-this-world information from NASA and ESA missions, kids will explore our Universe as never before. With exclusive interviews coupled with incredible facts, Space A Children's...read more

  • Mary Diana Dods Writing As David Lyndsey

    Mary Diana Dods was born at some point in 1790. Much of the details of her life are unknown.Accounts propose that she was one of the illegitimate daughters of George Douglas, the sixteenth Earl of Morton and that she and her older sister were raised in both Scotland and London. At the time a good education for women was a rarity but it seems Mary attended school or was home tutored.As a writer she seems only to have published under the pseudonym of David Lyndsay. Her works appeared in periodicals such as Blackwood's Magazine and in 1822 she was asked by its founder to provide it with 'Dramas of the Ancient World'. Writing as a male author in Victorian England gave her freedoms which would...read more

  • Dorothy Edwards

    Dorothy Edwards, an only child, was born on the 18th August 1902 at Ogmore Vale in Glamorgan.Her father was a headmaster and an early activist in the Independent Labour Party. At age 9 Dorothy, dressed in red, welcomed Keir Hardy on to the stage at Tonypandy during the national coal strike of 1912. She was taught that revolution was at hand, that class barriers would be a thing of the past. Dorothy won a scholarship and boarded at Howell's School for Girls in Llandaff before moving to University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire where she read Greek and philosophy.Her early hopes to be an opera singer were set to one side after graduating and the death of her father. Instead she...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    The eleventh month of the Gregorian year brings the change from Autumn into Winter. Landscapes are scrubbed of colour and all their frills, the statued forms of trees are the grammar, the structure of her ways. Days shorten, nights lengthen and for our classic poets there is work to be done.Across fifty poems our classic poets including Matthew Arnold, Thomas Hardy, Herman Melville, Anna Laetitia Barbauld and Alice Guerin Crist illuminate the month, the natural world and the human condition. In their words our experiences are reshaped, our views are rethought and our place in the world made a little more sense of.1 - Fifty Shades of November - An Introduction2 - November by John Clare3 -...read more

  • John Bunyan

    This great religious allegory, dating from the late 1670s, is presented as a dream in which Christian undertakes a journey through the Slough of Despond to the Celestial City. In Part II, he is followed by his wife Christina and their children. This allegory of a man in search of truth has proved popular throughout the world since its first...read more

  • Plato

    In Symposium, a group of Athenian aristocrats attend a party held by Agathon to celebrate his victory in the drama festival of the Dionysia. They talk about love until the drunken Alcibiades bursts in, and decides to talk about Socrates instead. Symposium gives a picture of the sparkling society that was Athens at the height of her empire. This classic discussion on love is presented in its ideal medium: a multi-voice...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    The first novel in Trollope's Chronicles of Barsetshire, The Warden is a compassionate portrait of the gentle, thoughtful warden and precentor of Barchester Cathedral, Mr Septimus Harding. Loved and appreciated by all with whom he works, Harding lives an ordered, regular life in his protected religious environment. Then one day, a young reformer feels he has uncovered a mismanagement of funds and Harding is held to blame. The accusation comes as a shock not only to Harding himself but also to the cathedral community. It then comes to wider notice when the cause is taken up by a national newspaper. Trollope's insight into character, his abundant imagination, and his sheer narrative skill are...read more

  • Samuel Richardson

    Pamela, Samuel Richardson’s tale of a beautiful teenage servant-girl protecting her virtue from the amorous advances of her master, created a furore on its publication in 1740. The reading public was split into two factions: those who accepted the story as an encouragement to virtuous behaviour, and those who saw it as disguised pornography. Written in the form of a series of letters from Pamela to her parents, Pamela is a landmark in the development of the English...read more

  • John Clare

    John Clare was the forgotten Romantic poet, until the late twentieth century. Known by his contemporaries as the ‘Peasant Poet’ he recorded in his poems the natural landscape of rural England before the Industrial Revolution. His poems rival Wordsworth’s for their sensitivity to nature and pantheism: ‘I feel a beautiful providence ever about me,’ Clare wrote. But his life was a long struggle against poverty and mental collapse. Some of his finest poems were written in the local...read more

  • William Blake

    Animal Poems. We all love animals, even if sometimes its only from afar on TV or at a zoo. But many of us have felt friendship and companionship with our friends in the animal world. We talk and react to them as if they really do understand us. Perhaps they do. In this volume Hardy, Thackeray, Carroll, DH Lawrence, Emily Dickinson and many others share their words with our...read more

  • Diotima

    Takes In Vein by Diotima Sophia. These stories reveal the truth about Vampires as told by a rather special vampire. Not the romantic or even the really nastily horrific stories that the non-vampires amongst us have dreamed up. Tracing a life lived over centuries from Ancient Rome, right through to the more modern Texas, these stories are linked by the narrator with interludes of explanation. Subtly dark and with enough horror behind to send a shudder down the spine in places, but with gentle humour and a facility for twisting the historic truth just so much that the fictitious explanation makes sense in...read more

  • Robert Louis Stevenson

    Robert Louis Stevenson is part of the rich tradition of Scottish literature and as well as classics such as Treasure Island he also wrote the dark, disturbing and schziophrenic Dr Jeckyll & Mr Hyde. It is thrilling in its horror and beautifully positions the dual nature of man as each side attempts to control the...read more

  • William Wordsworth

    The office of Poet Laureate is a high honour amongst poets. The Ancient Greeks had the first idea and their heroes and Poets wore wreaths of Laurel in honour of the god Apollo. Many countries now have a Laureate as do many societies and organisations. But perhaps ranked first among them all is that of our own Poet Laureate. Unfortunately no single authentic definitive record exists of the office of Poet Laureate of England. In some form it can be traced back to 1189 and Richard Canonicus who was employed by Richard I with the title "versificator Regis". It is said that Geoffrey Chaucer was called Poet Laureate, being granted in 1389 an annual allowance of wine. After that there were a...read more

  • Robert Browning

    With classics such as 'My Last Duchess' and 'The Pied Piper Of Hamelin' Robert Browning's status as one of the great Victorian Poets will always be secure in popular culture. For the more literary he is considered a master of dramatic verse and dramatic monologues. It is interesting to note that his career bloomed late. Indeed it was only after the death of his wife Elizabeth in 1861 and his return to England from their life in Italy that his work came into wider acceptance and critical acclaim. In the last years of his life he recorded part of a poem on a wax cylinder which was played after his death. It was said to be the first time anyone's voice had been heard from beyond the...read more

  • Rudyard Kipling

    On a summer's day we have perhaps all wish to take flight and view life and the world from the vantage point of a clear blue sky. Our feathered friends do it as a matter of course and in this volume some of our finest wordsmith's speak with imagination, longing and desire on their...read more

  • John Milton

    In the years between 1660 and 1700 much upheaval took place in English politics. To mirror this rising on the artistic scene were the Restoration Poets - Dryden, Milton, Bunyan, Marvell, D'Avennat, Cowley .... are but a select few from this momentous movement in our Poetical History. Poets of courage, ambition and vigour. With the strength of words and vision to record for history this tumultuous...read more

  • Edmund Spenser

    For our Renaissance Poets we start with the coming to the throne of Henry 8th in 1519. From then until its end, with the crumbling of the English Republic under Cromwell, in 1659 these poets capture a time when the World as they knew it then underwent tumultuous change. Within their ranks were Spenser, Donne, Milton, Shakespeare, Sidney, Jonson, Marvell, Drayton. It is a list rich and sumptuous, long and gloried. In these volumes we bring all these poets and others together to illustrate this poetical...read more