Searching for: "David Shaw Parker"

  • Sheridan Le Fanu

    Joseph Thomas Sheridan Le Fanu was born on August 28th, 1814, at 45 Lower Dominick Street, Dublin, into a literary family with Huguenot, Irish and English rootsThe children were tutored but, according to his brother William, the tutor taught them little if anything. Le Fanu was eager to learn and used his father's library to educate himself about the world. He was a creative child and by fifteen had taken to writing poetry.Accepted into Trinity College, Dublin to study law he also benefited from the system used in Ireland that he did not have to live in Dublin to attend lectures, but could study at home and take examinations at the university as and when necessary.This enabled him to also...read more

  • Ernest Bramah

    Ernest Bramah was born on 20th March 1868. He was an intensely private man and very little about his life was ever released.Bramah dropped out of Manchester Grammar school at sixteen, in almost all his subjects he was close to the bottom of his class, and took a job at a farm. His father then invested substantial sums in setting him up with his own farm but Bramah's long term interests were elsewhere. In his spare time he would write vignettes on local subjects and send them to The Birmingham News for publication.In a now rather dramatic change of career he obtained the position of secretary to Jerome K Jerome and then to editing one of Jerome's magazines. Thereafter Bramah edited...read more

  • John William Polidori

    John William Polidori was born on 7th September 1795 in London to Gaetano Polidori, an Italian political émigré scholar, and Anna Maria Pierce, an English governess. He was the eldest of 8 children.From 1804 Polidori was a pupil at the recently formed Ampleforth College. In 1810 he proceeded to the University of Edinburgh, where he wrote a thesis on sleepwalking and received his degree as a doctor of medicine on 1st August 1815. He was 19.In 1816, Dr. Polidori was given the job of Byron's personal physician and accompanied him on a trip through Europe. The publisher John Murray offered Polidori £500 to keep a diary of their travels. At the Villa Diodati, Byron's rented villa at Lake...read more

  • Richard Harris Barham

    Richard Harris Barham was born in Canterbury, England on 6th December 1788. His father died when he was seven leaving him a small estate, including the manor of Tappington of Denton in Kent. As a nine-year old he was sent to St Paul's School where, in an accident, one of his arms was partially crippled. His focus went from the physical to the mental and he became a dedicated reader and diligent student.In 1807 he entered Brasenose College, Oxford, to study Law. However he decided instead that his path in life was to be religious and in 1813 he was ordained and accepted a country curacy and in 1821 he received the post of minor canon of St. Paul's Cathedral in London, where he served as a...read more

  • Arthur Moore

    In this age of instant access to information it would be thought that anyone's past could be revealed. Alas for the Victorian author Arthur Moore, details are almost non-existent. Born on 14th January 1866 the only details that can be confirmed are that he wrote the short story 'Second Thoughts' and co-authored two works with Ernest Dowson. From there we only have the year of his death - 1934.However, his life aside 'Second Thoughts' is one of those short works, published in Volume 3 of the infamous Yellow Book in the late 1890's, that have given a certainty of his existence and merits attention based on the quality of this writing & invention.The story unfolds around a man returning...read more

  • Netta Syrett

    Netta Syrett was born Janet Syrett on 17th March 1865 in Ramsgate, Kent, one of 13 children.She was initially educated at home by her mother before those responsibilities passed to a German Governess and then, aged 11, Netta went to the North London Collegiate School. From there she attended Hughes Hall, Cambridge and completed a three-year course for a full teaching certificate in only one year.She taught for two years at a Swansea school before moving to teach at the London Polytechnic School for Girls. Her friend and colleague, Mabel Beardsley, introduced her to her brother, Aubrey, the famed illustrator and the then art editor for the illustrated quarterly 'The Yellow Book', and its...read more

  • Vernon Lee

    Vernon Lee was born Violet Paget on 4th October 1856 in Boulogne, France to intellectual expatriate British parents. In common with several other very talented literary women of the day she felt it necessary to publish under a masculine pseudonym in order for her writing to be taken seriously. Indeed she seems to have adopted that persona across her whole lifestyle becoming personally known and acknowledged by all as Vernon Lee and accordingly dressed as a man. Her first published work, in 1880, was taken from her collection of essays that had originally appeared in Fraser's Magazine with the scholarly title of; 'Studies of the Eighteenth Century in Italy.' It reflected her passion for...read more

  • Henry James

    During the Victorian era the publishing of magazines and periodicals accelerated at a phenomenal rate. This really was mass market publishing to a hungry audience eager for literary sustenance. Many of our greatest authors contributed and expanded their reach whilst many fledging authors also found a ready source for their nascent works and careers.Amongst the very many was 'The Yellow Book'. Although titled as 'An Illustrated Quarterly' it was sold as a cloth-bound hardback and within were short stories, essays, poetry, illustrations and portraits. It was edited by the American author Henry Harland, who also contributed, and its art editor was no less that the formidable Aubrey...read more

  • Netta Syrett

    During the Victorian era the publishing of magazines and periodicals accelerated at a phenomenal rate. This really was mass market publishing to a hungry audience eager for literary sustenance. Many of our greatest authors contributed and expanded their reach whilst many fledging authors also found a ready source for their nascent works and careers.Amongst the very many was 'The Yellow Book'. Although titled as 'An Illustrated Quarterly' it was sold as a cloth-bound hardback and within were short stories, essays, poetry, illustrations and portraits. It was edited by the American author Henry Harland, who also contributed, and its art editor was no less that the formidable Aubrey...read more

  • Kenneth Grahame

    During the Victorian era the publishing of magazines and periodicals accelerated at a phenomenal rate. This really was mass market publishing to a hungry audience eager for literary sustenance. Many of our greatest authors contributed and expanded their reach whilst many fledging authors also found a ready source for their nascent works and careers.Amongst the very many was 'The Yellow Book'. Although titled as 'An Illustrated Quarterly' it was sold as a cloth-bound hardback and within were short stories, essays, poetry, illustrations and portraits. It was edited by the American author Henry Harland, who also contributed, and its art editor was no less that the formidable Aubrey...read more

  • Leo Tolstoy

    Leo Tolstoy was born in 1828 in the Russian province of Tula to a wealthy noble family. As a child, he had private tutors but he showed little interest in any formal education. When he went to the University of Kazan in 1843 to study oriental languages and law, he left without completing his courses. Life now was relaxed and idle but with some writing also taking place. Gambling debts forced an abrupt change of path and he joined the army to fight in the Crimean War. He was commended for his bravery and promoted but was appalled at the brutality and loss of life. He recorded these and other earlier experiences in his diaries which formed the basis of several of his works.In 1852...read more

  • Anton Chekhov

    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov was born on 29th January 1860 in Taganrog, on the south coast of Russia. His family life was difficult; his father was strict and over-bearing but his mother was a passionate story-teller, a subject Chekhov warmed to. As he later said; 'our talents we got from our father, but our soul from our mother'. At school Chekhov was distinctly average. At 16 his father mis-managed his finances and was declared bankrupt. His family fled to Moscow. Chekhov remained and eked out a living by various means, including writing and selling short sketches to newspapers, to finish his schooling. That completed and with a scholarship to Moscow University obtained he rejoined his...read more

  • Robert Louis Stevenson

    Occasionally an author appears who, in a short career, emblazons a legacy so bright and so distinct, as well as popular that it is difficult to believe it is the output of only one man. Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson was such a talent.Stevenson was born on 13th November 1850 in Edinburgh. Despite a late start to reading and writing he was a voracious story-teller, regularly performing yarns for all those around him. His health though was poorly, he suffered lifelong bronchial problems and was incapacitated by this and other ailments throughout his life.In Grez, France in September 1876 he met the American, Fanny Van de Grift Osbourne. She was married with children but distress and anger...read more

  • Mirabai

    Whilst Europe endured the Dark Ages in the 6th & 7th Centuries devotees of Shiva and Vishnu in Southern India were creating the Bhakti Movement. Some of these exponents, as in our volume, were bestowed with the title of saint but some had the additional title of sant, swami or goswami.Broadly speaking, Bhakti poetry, as in Hinduism itself, is divided into 'Nirguna', the idea that the divine is formless as exampled by Kabir and 'Saguna' which interprets the divine as having physical form as captured by Mirabai. The rapid spread, of the Bhakti movement, with its theme of love and devotion to God, proffered by these rebellious poet saints, did, over the following centuries, meld with much...read more

  • Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

    Arthur Conan Doyle was born in Edinburgh, Scotland on 22nd May 1859. His childhood was blighted by his father's heavy drinking which for some years broke up the family. Fortunately, wealthy uncles were willing to support them by paying for education and clothing. He was accepted at the University of Edinburgh to study medicine and also began to write short stories the first, 'The Haunted Grange of Goresthorpe', was published in Blackwood's Magazine. Despite several other stories and some articles in the British Medical Journal his medical studies took priority.When these finished he was appointed as Doctor on the Greenland whaler 'Hope of Peterhead' in 1880 and then, after graduation, as...read more

  • Franz Kafka

    The top 10 short stories of all time written by European authors.Short stories have always been a sort of instant access into an author's brain, their soul and heart. A few pages can lift our lives into locations, people and experiences with a sweep of landscape, narration, feelings and emotions that is difficult to achieve elsewhere.In this series we try to offer up tried and trusted 'Top Tens' across many different themes and authors. But any anthology will immediately throw up the questions - Why that story? Why that author? The theme itself will form the boundaries for our stories which range from well-known classics, newly told, to stories that modern times have overlooked but...read more

  • Rudyard Kipling

    The top 10 Victorian ghost short stories of all time.Short stories have always been a sort of instant access into an author's brain, their soul and heart. A few pages can lift our lives into locations, people and experiences with a sweep of landscape, narration, feelings and emotions that is difficult to achieve elsewhere.In this series we try to offer up tried and trusted 'Top Tens' across many different themes and authors. But any anthology will immediately throw up the questions - Why that story? Why that author? The theme itself will form the boundaries for our stories which range from well-known classics, newly told, to stories that modern times have overlooked but perfectly exemplify...read more

  • Bram Stoker

    The top 10 horror short stories of all time.Short stories have always been a sort of instant access into an author's brain, their soul and heart. A few pages can lift our lives into locations, people and experiences with a sweep of landscape, narration, feelings and emotions that is difficult to achieve elsewhere.In this series we try to offer up tried and trusted 'Top Tens' across many different themes and authors. But any anthology will immediately throw up the questions - Why that story? Why that author? The theme itself will form the boundaries for our stories which range from well-known classics, newly told, to stories that modern times have overlooked but perfectly exemplify the...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    The top 10 short stories of all time written by British authors.Short stories have always been a sort of instant access into an author's brain, their soul and heart. A few pages can lift our lives into locations, people and experiences with a sweep of landscape, narration, feelings and emotions that is difficult to achieve elsewhere.In this series we try to offer up tried and trusted 'Top Tens' across many different themes and authors. But any anthology will immediately throw up the questions - Why that story? Why that author? The theme itself will form the boundaries for our stories which range from well-known classics, newly told, to stories that modern times have overlooked but...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    The top 10 short stories of all time written by British female authors.Short stories have always been a sort of instant access into an author’s brain, their soul and heart. A few pages can lift our lives into locations, people and experiences with a sweep of landscape, narration, feelings and emotions that is difficult to achieve elsewhere.In this series we try to offer up tried and trusted ‘Top Tens’ across many different themes and authors. But any anthology will immediately throw up the questions – Why that story? Why that author? The theme itself will form the boundaries for our stories which range from well-known classics, newly told, to stories that modern times have...read more