Searching for: "David Shaw Parker"

  • Algernon Blackwood

    Algernon Blackwood was born on 14th March 1869 in Shooter's Hill, South East London, to a religious middle-class family. His mother was a widowed Duchess and his father was a Post Office administrator. Blackwood was interested in the paranormal and the supernatural at an early age, and had a thirst for anything on Buddhism, other Oriental philosophies, mysticism and occultism. In his writings the weaving of the supernatural into his various works, from ghost stories and children's stories to plays and long novels is clearly seen, his writings beautifully enriched by his long and diversified life experience. After leaving university and visiting parts of Europe, mainly Switzerland, the...read more

  • Vernon Lee

    Vernon Lee was born Violet Paget on 4th October 1856 in Boulogne, France to intellectual expatriate British parents. In common with several other very talented literary women of the day she felt it necessary to publish under a masculine pseudonym in order for her writing to be taken seriously. Indeed she seems to have adopted that persona across her whole lifestyle becoming personally known and acknowledged by all as Vernon Lee and accordingly dressed as a man. Her first published work, in 1880, was taken from her collection of essays that had originally appeared in Fraser's Magazine with the scholarly title of; 'Studies of the Eighteenth Century in Italy.' It reflected her passion for...read more

  • Amy Levy

    Émile Édouard Charles Antoine Zola was born in Paris on 2nd April 1840. When he was 3 the family moved to Aix-en-Provence in the southeast. At 7 his father died, leaving the family on a meagre pension. In 1858, they returned to Paris. His mother had planned a law career for Émile, but he failed his baccalauréat examination twice.He took jobs as a clerk in a shipping firm and then in the sales department for the publisher Hachette. Zola also wrote political, literary and art reviews for newspapers. As a writer Zola wrote numerous short stories, essays, plays and novels. When ‘La Confession de Claude’ was published and received the attention of the police Hachette fired him. He...read more

  • Anthony Hope

    Sir Anthony Hope Hawkins was born on 9th February 1863 in Clapton, London. He was educated at St John's School, Leatherhead, Marlborough College and Balliol College, Oxford. Hope trained as a lawyer and barrister and was called to the Bar by the Middle Temple in 1887. Despite what was thought to be a promising legal career he had literary ambitions and wrote in his spare time.His early works appeared in various periodicals of the day but for his first book 'A Man of Mark' (1890), with no publisher interested, he published with his own resources. More novels and short stories followed, including the mildly successful 'Mr Witt's Widow' in 1892. Hope even found time to run as the Liberal...read more

  • Anton Chekhov

    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov was born on 29th January 1860 in Taganrog, on the south coast of Russia. His family life was difficult; his father was strict and over-bearing but his mother was a passionate story-teller, a subject Chekhov warmed to. As he later said; 'our talents we got from our father, but our soul from our mother'. At school Chekhov was distinctly average. At 16 his father mis-managed his finances and was declared bankrupt. His family fled to Moscow. Chekhov remained and eked out a living by various means, including writing and selling short sketches to newspapers, to finish his schooling. That completed and with a scholarship to Moscow University obtained he rejoined his...read more

  • Barry Pain

    Barry Eric Odell Pain was born at 3 Sydney Street in Cambridge on 28th September 1864. He was one of 4 children.He was educated at Sedbergh School and then Corpus Christi College, Cambridge where he read classics and contributed to and edited Granta.Four years of service as an Army coach followed before he moved to London. In 1889, Cornhill Magazine published his short story 'The Hundred Gates'. This opened the way for Pain to advance his literary career on several fronts. He became a contributor to Punch and The Speaker, as well as joining the staff of both the Daily Chronicle and Black and White. In 1897 he succeeded Jerome K Jerome as editor of To-Day but still contributed regularly,...read more

  • James Wilde

    Brought to you by Penguin. Bridging the gap between 'Game of Thrones' and Bernard Cornwell comes the third chapter in James Wilde's epic adventure of betrayal, battle and bloodshed . . . For all the darkness in the land, there is hope. And it rests with one man. Lucanus - the one they call the Wolf - is a warrior. He wears the ancient crown of the great war leader, Pendragon, and he wields a sword bestowed upon him by the druids. And he is the guardian of a secret entrusted to him and to protect that secret will demand untold bravery and sacrifice beyond measure - but to lose it would mean the end of everything worth fighting for. Before Camelot. Before Excalibur. Before all you...read more

  • Kevin Crossley-Holland

    Ancient, rich, and strange, this collection of eerie tales from across Britain and Ireland have influenced our culture and the folklore that...read more

  • Mirabai

    Whilst Europe endured the Dark Ages in the 6th & 7th Centuries devotees of Shiva and Vishnu in Southern India were creating the Bhakti Movement. Some of these exponents, as in our volume, were bestowed with the title of saint but some had the additional title of sant, swami or goswami.Broadly speaking, Bhakti poetry, as in Hinduism itself, is divided into 'Nirguna', the idea that the divine is formless as exampled by Kabir and 'Saguna' which interprets the divine as having physical form as captured by Mirabai. The rapid spread, of the Bhakti movement, with its theme of love and devotion to God, proffered by these rebellious poet saints, did, over the following centuries, meld with much...read more

  • Boleslaw Prus

    Aleksander G?owacki who wrote under the nom de plume Boleslaw Prus was born on 20th August 1847 at Hrubieszów in the Kingdom of Poland, at that time, controlled by the Russian Empire.At three his mother died and then at nine his father. Female relatives helped raise him but at 15 he joined the Polish uprising against the might of Imperial Russia. Wounded on the battlefield, arrested and imprisoned, he was later released into the care of a relative and resumed secondary school and then Warsaw University but poverty forced him to leave after two years. At some point he developed agoraphobia which often caused problems.In 1869, he enrolled in the Forestry Department at Pu?awy but was soon...read more

  • Dorothy Edwards

    These British Isles, moored across from mainland Europe, are more often seen as a world unto themselves. Restless and creative, they often warred amongst themselves until they began a global push to forge a World Empire of territory, of trade and of language.Here our ambitions are only of the literary kind. These shores have mustered many masters of literature. So this anthology's boundaries includes only those authors who were born in the British Isles - which as a geographical definition is the UK mainland and the island of Ireland - and wrote in a familiar form of English.Whilst Daniel Defoe is the normal starting point we begin a little earlier with Aphra Behn, an equally colourful...read more

  • Oscar Wilde

    Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde was born on the 16th October 1854 in Dublin, Ireland. The son of Dublin intellectuals Oscar proved himself an outstanding classicist at Trinity College and then at Oxford. Wilde then moved to London and its fashionable cultural and social circles. With his biting wit, flamboyant dress, and glittering conversation, Wilde became one of the most well-known personalities of his day.His only novel, ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray’ was published in 1890 and he then moved on to writing for the stage with ‘Salome’ in 1891. His society comedies were enormous hits and turned him into one of the most successful writers of late Victorian London.Whilst his...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoevsky

    Christmas may come but once a year but evil, intrigue and malevolence are everyday events.Within this volume Christmas is a time when these dark forces form and coalesce to take life and liberty from people who may and who may not deserve the spin of its wheel.Some are merely evil, others have the beginnings of a conscience that displays itself in a dialogue with the devil, or perhaps only themselves.But, in this volume Christmas takes a ringside seat to the horrors of the human heart.1 - Christmas. Stories from the Dark Side - An Introduction2 - Markheim by Robert Louis Stevenson3 - The Burglar's Christmas by Willa Cather4 - The Beggar Boy at Christ's Christmas Tree by Fyodor Dostoevsky5 -...read more

  • Ernest Bramah

    Ernest Bramah was born on 20th March 1868. He was an intensely private man and very little about his life was ever released.Bramah dropped out of Manchester Grammar school at sixteen, in almost all his subjects he was close to the bottom of his class, and took a job at a farm. His father then invested substantial sums in setting him up with his own farm but Bramah's long term interests were elsewhere. In his spare time he would write vignettes on local subjects and send them to The Birmingham News for publication.In a now rather dramatic change of career he obtained the position of secretary to Jerome K Jerome and then to editing one of Jerome's magazines. Thereafter Bramah edited...read more

  • William Shakespeare

    The Bard, William Shakespeare, is the supreme talent of playwriting and perhaps also of those 14 lines of verse we call the Sonnet.The Elizabethan Sonnet Cycle was a popular form for poets in the 16th Century with masterful works by many including Sir Phillip Sidney Edmund Spenser and Michael Drayton. Many others wrote sonnets interspersed amongst their other works such as John Donne and even Queen Elizabeth herself.But ranking above all others is William Shakespeare. Some of his sonnets are known in part or whole by all of us such as Sonnet 116 Let me not to the marriage of true minds. Sonnet 97 'How long has my absence been' and Sonnet 18 'Shall I compare thee to a Summers day'. Many...read more

  • Perceval Gibbon

    Perceval Gibbon was born on the 4th November 1879 in Trelech, Carmarthenshire in Wales and, unusually, was partly educated at the Moravian School, in Koenigsfeld, Baden, Germany. Gibbon's early career was as a merchant seaman during which he travelled to Europe, Africa, and the Americas. These early experiences were later reflected in his literary works.He is perhaps best known for his 1912 novel 'Margaret Harding' but began his literary career as a poet with 'African Items' in 1903 followed quickly by two novels and then the first collection of his short stories in 1905: 'Vrouw Grobelaar's Leading Cases'. His short stories were much admired, and many contained cutting and ironic...read more

  • D.H. Lawrence

    DH Lawrence. This collection brings together 5 of Lawrence's short stories from 1907-13 and range across all his major early styles and themes; portraying his distinctive vision or relations between men and woman as well as social and economic life and human nature in general. The stories here concentrate on the details and dramas of everyday living, yet Lawrence is able to make these familiar things seen both vivid and strange, drawing the listener into an intense participation of the thoughts and emotional experiences of his characters. David shaw -Parker has worked in theatres throughout Britain. He was acted in many radio plays for both BBC World Service and Radio 4 as well...read more

  • James Wilde

    Random House presents the audiobook edition of Dark Age, written by James Wilde, read by David Shaw Parker. Bridging the gap between 'Game of Thrones' and Bernard Cornwell comes the second chapter in James Wilde's epic adventure of betrayal, battle and bloodshed . . . It is AD 367, and Roman Britain has fallen to the vast barbarian horde which has invaded from the north. Towns burn, the land is ravaged and the few survivors flee. The army of Rome - once the most effective fighting force in the world - has been broken, its spirit lost and its remaining troops shattered. Yet for all the darkness, there is hope. And it rests with one man. His name is Lucanus who they call the Wolf....read more

  • Anton Chekhov

    Science, better diet, advanced medicines are all part of a process that in the modern age keep most of us going to a ripe old age.In previous times some diseases could only be slowed and not defeated. There toil of relentless attack on our physical forms brought misery and decay. Add to this that within our number some will self-destruct, demons will pursue their inner thoughts and life will be too painful to bear. Some may shuffle off the mortal coil for no discernible reason, but life will end early, they will not take up their three-score year and ten.In this collection of short stories some of our most popular and well-known authors are grouped together with an unfortunate tag: dead at...read more

  • George Gissing

    Science, better diet, advanced medicines are all part of a process that in the modern age keep most of us going to a ripe old age.In previous times some diseases could only be slowed and not defeated. There toil of relentless attack on our physical forms brought misery and decay. Add to this that within our number some will self-destruct, demons will pursue their inner thoughts and life will be too painful to bear. Some may shuffle off the mortal coil for no discernible reason, but life will end early, they will not take up their three-score year and ten.In this collection of short stories some of our most popular and well-known authors are grouped together with an unfortunate tag: dead at...read more