Searching for: "David Shaw Parker"

  • John Bunyan

    This great religious allegory, dating from the late 1670s, is presented as a dream in which Christian undertakes a journey through the Slough of Despond to the Celestial City. In Part II, he is followed by his wife Christina and their children. This allegory of a man in search of truth has proved popular throughout the world since its first...read more

  • William Wordsworth

    The office of Poet Laureate is a high honour amongst poets. The Ancient Greeks had the first idea and their heroes and Poets wore wreaths of Laurel in honour of the god Apollo. Many countries now have a Laureate as do many societies and organisations. But perhaps ranked first among them all is that of our own Poet Laureate. Unfortunately no single authentic definitive record exists of the office of Poet Laureate of England. In some form it can be traced back to 1189 and Richard Canonicus who was employed by Richard I with the title "versificator Regis". It is said that Geoffrey Chaucer was called Poet Laureate, being granted in 1389 an annual allowance of wine. After that there were a...read more

  • William Blake

    Animal Poems. We all love animals, even if sometimes its only from afar on TV or at a zoo. But many of us have felt friendship and companionship with our friends in the animal world. We talk and react to them as if they really do understand us. Perhaps they do. In this volume Hardy, Thackeray, Carroll, DH Lawrence, Emily Dickinson and many others share their words with our...read more

  • Rudyard Kipling

    On a summer's day we have perhaps all wish to take flight and view life and the world from the vantage point of a clear blue sky. Our feathered friends do it as a matter of course and in this volume some of our finest wordsmith's speak with imagination, longing and desire on their...read more

  • James Joyce

    James Augustine Aloysius Joyce was born on the 2nd February 1882 in Dublin into a middle-class family, and the eldest of ten surviving siblingsAdmired as a brilliant student he briefly attended the Christian Brothers-run O'Connell School before excelling at the Jesuit schools of Clongowes and Belvedere. From there he went on to attend University College Dublin from 1898, studying English, French and ItalianIn 1902, Joyce was now in his early twenties, and went to Paris to study Medicine but soon abandoned his teachings. Back in Dublin to attend to his dying Mother he met Nora Barnacle. They bonded immediately into a life-long match. Together they decided to emigrate to Europe. The couple...read more

  • Lewis Carroll

    Lewis Carroll was born Charles Lutwidge Dodgson on the 27th January 1832 at Daresbury, Cheshire, the eldest boy and the third child. Another eight followed. When Dodgson was 11, his cleric father moved his family to Croft-on-Tees in the North Riding of Yorkshire. Although his father was active and highly conservative his son was ambivalent with those values and with the Church as a whole.In his early years Dodgson was educated at home and by age 7 he was reading the likes of ‘The Pilgrim's Progress’. He also spoke with a stammer which he called his ‘hesitation’.At 12 he was dispatched to Richmond Grammar School in North Yorkshire and then on to Rugby. He sailed through the...read more

  • Richard Le Gallienne

    Richard Thomas Gallienne was born in Liverpool on 20th January, 1866.His first job was in an accountant's office, but this was quickly abandoned to pursue his first love as a professional writer. His first work, My Ladies' Sonnets, was published in 1887. In 1889 he became, for a brief time, literary secretary to Wilson Barrett the manager, actor, and playwright. Barrett enjoyed immense success with the staging of melodramas, which would later reach a peak with the historical tragedy The Sign of the Cross (1895).Le Gallienne joined the staff of The Star newspaper in 1891, and also wrote for various other papers under the pseudonym 'Logroller'. He contributed to the short-lived but...read more

  • Robert Browning

    With classics such as 'My Last Duchess' and 'The Pied Piper Of Hamelin' Robert Browning's status as one of the great Victorian Poets will always be secure in popular culture. For the more literary he is considered a master of dramatic verse and dramatic monologues. It is interesting to note that his career bloomed late. Indeed it was only after the death of his wife Elizabeth in 1861 and his return to England from their life in Italy that his work came into wider acceptance and critical acclaim. In the last years of his life he recorded part of a poem on a wax cylinder which was played after his death. It was said to be the first time anyone's voice had been heard from beyond the...read more

  • Hafiz

    Sleep. That most mysterious of times. The unconscious hours.Everyone needs it. Whether it's the recommended eight hours, forty winks, cat naps, power naps or other shades of blissful slumber. Sleep offers a respite from the rigors and challenges of the day. A chance for the brain to process what has happened and bring rest and recuperation before the cycle of daytime activity begins again.Also, perchance to dream or, if we are unlucky, the visitation of nightmares.But for some people sleep does not come easy. These can be wakeful hours of frustration or tedium where closing the eyes does not bring the closing of the mind and the slumber so keenly wanted.Part of the problem, in this...read more

  • Hafiz

    Sufism had its origins in the early days of Islam and was defined by its mystical and philosophical absorption with the search for God and the love and grace of God. The striving for union with God was the ultimate Sufi goal but could not be achieved until death, so earthly life devoted itself to worship God, love mankind, respect nature and conquer the Self, severing the chains of our worldly life. Along the centuries numerous interpretations and definitions of Sufism have waxed and waned but the undeniable beauty of their verse in its myriad of forms including the musical Ghazal (love song), Masnavi (narrative) and Rubai (quatrain) always remains. Our chronological volume of the...read more

  • James Joyce

    In England the Victorian Age was about to become the past and a new age of worldwide wars of horror and slaughter would envelop and decimate generations, forever staining mankind. The Century would see the World discover strengths. The Democracies would stand firm against Fascism and later Communism yet still keep its own elite and privileged in power and the rest of us underfoot.The World was more connected than ever before. Culture accelerated its kaleidoscopic and interwoven journey. Transport delivered people by car and train and then aeroplane to far flung corners of the globe. Empires were at their zenith and ready to fragment with new nations, many troubled, rising from their...read more

  • James Joyce

    In England the Victorian Age was about to become the past and a new age of worldwide wars of horror and slaughter would envelop and decimate generations, forever staining mankind. The Century would see the World discover strengths. The Democracies would stand firm against Fascism and later Communism yet still keep its own elite and privileged in power and the rest of us underfoot.The World was more connected than ever before. Culture accelerated its kaleidoscopic and interwoven journey. Transport delivered people by car and train and then aeroplane to far flung corners of the globe. Empires were at their zenith and ready to fragment with new nations, many troubled, rising from their...read more

  • Dk

    This invaluable, easy-to-understand guide to world politics and government offers an accessible introduction to more than 80 of the most important theories and big ideas of leaders and politicians throughout history. The Politics Book makes government and politics easy to understand by explaining the big ideas simply. The key events in political history are outlined from the origins of political thinking by Confucius and Aristotle to modern-day activists such as Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela. This audiobook breaks down their important concepts into bite-size chunks to make the subject accessible to students of politics and anyone with an interest in how government works....read more

  • Dk

    This invaluable, easy-to-understand guide to world politics and government offers an accessible introduction to more than 80 of the most important theories and big ideas of leaders and politicians throughout history. The Politics Book makes government and politics easy to understand by explaining the big ideas simply. The key events in political history are outlined from the origins of political thinking by Confucius and Aristotle to modern-day activists such as Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela. This audiobook breaks down their important concepts into bite-size chunks to make the subject accessible to students of politics and anyone with an interest in how government works....read more

  • Mary Diana Dods Writing As David Lyndsey

    Mary Diana Dods was born at some point in 1790. Much of the details of her life are unknown.Accounts propose that she was one of the illegitimate daughters of George Douglas, the sixteenth Earl of Morton and that she and her older sister were raised in both Scotland and London. At the time a good education for women was a rarity but it seems Mary attended school or was home tutored.As a writer she seems only to have published under the pseudonym of David Lyndsay. Her works appeared in periodicals such as Blackwood's Magazine and in 1822 she was asked by its founder to provide it with 'Dramas of the Ancient World'. Writing as a male author in Victorian England gave her freedoms which would...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    When the liberal government falls and neither party is able to form a cabinet, Plantaganet Palliser is called upon to lead a coalition government. He is reluctant at first, and displays none of the charisma of his predecessors, but eventually he grows into the role. However, his confidence is short-lived as he becomes embroiled in a scandal involving the villainous Ferdinand Lopez - unintentionally brought about by Lady Glencora Palliser. Pronounced 'a beautiful book' by Leo Tolstoy, The Prime Minister is a superb portrait of marriage and politics, and the compromises necessary for success in both. It is the fifth novel in Trollope's Palliser series. **Contact Customer Service for...read more

  • William Edward Norris

    William Edward Norris was born on the 18th November 1847, the son of Sir William Norris, the Chief Justice of Ceylon.Norris was educated at Eton before studying law and being called to the bar at the Inner Temple in 1874.However, he never practiced law but instead pursued his dreams of a literary career. His first publication, 'Heap of Money' appeared in 1877. He was prolific and wrote over sixty novels together with a small library of short stories. Much of his work was serialised and published in magazines such as Cornhill ort Temple Bar before being released in book form.William Edward Norris died on the 20th November at his home in Torquay, England at the age of...read more

  • Edmund Spenser

    For our Renaissance Poets we start with the coming to the throne of Henry 8th in 1519. From then until its end, with the crumbling of the English Republic under Cromwell, in 1659 these poets capture a time when the World as they knew it then underwent tumultuous change. Within their ranks were Spenser, Donne, Milton, Shakespeare, Sidney, Jonson, Marvell, Drayton. It is a list rich and sumptuous, long and gloried. In these volumes we bring all these poets and others together to illustrate this poetical...read more

  • John Milton

    In the years between 1660 and 1700 much upheaval took place in English politics. To mirror this rising on the artistic scene were the Restoration Poets - Dryden, Milton, Bunyan, Marvell, D'Avennat, Cowley .... are but a select few from this momentous movement in our Poetical History. Poets of courage, ambition and vigour. With the strength of words and vision to record for history this tumultuous...read more

  • Dorothy Edwards

    Dorothy Edwards, an only child, was born on the 18th August 1902 at Ogmore Vale in Glamorgan.Her father was a headmaster and an early activist in the Independent Labour Party. At age 9 Dorothy, dressed in red, welcomed Keir Hardy on to the stage at Tonypandy during the national coal strike of 1912. She was taught that revolution was at hand, that class barriers would be a thing of the past. Dorothy won a scholarship and boarded at Howell's School for Girls in Llandaff before moving to University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire where she read Greek and philosophy.Her early hopes to be an opera singer were set to one side after graduating and the death of her father. Instead she...read more