Searching for: "Derek Perkins"

  • Brian Nelson

    Émile Zola was the leader of the literary movement known as 'naturalism' and is one of the great figures of the novel. In his monumental Les Rougon-Macquart (1871-93), he explored the social and cultural landscape of the late nineteenth century in ways that scandalized bourgeois society. Zola opened the novel up to a new realm of subjects, including the realities of working-class life, class relations, and questions of gender and sexuality, and his writing embodied a new freedom of expression, with his bold, outspoken voice often inviting controversy. In this Very Short Introduction, Brian Nelson examines Zola's major themes and narrative art. He illuminates the social and political...read more

  • Norman Stone

    After the unprecedented destruction of the Great War, the world longed for a lasting peace. The victors, however, valued vengeance even more than stability and demanded a massive indemnity from Germany in order to keep it from rearming. The results, as eminent historian Norman Stone describes in this authoritative history, were disastrous.In World War Two, Stone provides a remarkably concise account of the deadliest war of human history, showing how the conflict roared to life from the ashes of World War One. Adolf Hitler rode a tide of popular desperation and resentment to power in Germany, promptly making good on his promise to return the nation to its former economic and military...read more

  • International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World bank

    This report argues that development policies based on new insights into how people actually think and make decisions will help governments and civil society more readily tackle such challenges as increasing productivity, breaking the cycle of poverty from one generation to the next, and acting on climate change. Drawing from a wealth of research that suggests ways of diagnosing and solving the psychological and social constraints to development, the "World Development Report 2015" identifies new policy tools that complement standard economic instruments. To inspire a fresh look at how development work is done, this report outlines three principles of human decision making: thinking...read more

  • Paul Kane

    From the greatest names in fantasy and horror comes an anthology of stories inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Join Alice as she is thrown into the whirlwind of Wonderland. Within these pages you'll find myriad approaches to Alice, from horror to historical, taking us from the nightmarish reaches of the imagination to tales that will shock, surprise, and tug on the heart-strings. So, it's time now to go down the rabbit hole, or through the looking-glass, or ... But no, wait. By picking up this book and starting to read it you're already there, can't you...read more

  • Michael Schmicker

    Italy, 1899: Fiery-tempered, seductive medium Alessandra Poverelli levitates a table at a Spiritualist seance in Naples. A reporter photographs the miracle, and wealthy, skeptical psychiatrist Camillo Lombardi arrives in Naples to investigate. When she materializes the ghost of his dead mother, he risks his reputation and fortune to finance a tour of the Continent, challenging the scientific and academic elite of Europe to test Alessandra's mysterious powers. She will help him rewrite science. His fee will help her escape her sadistic husband, Pigotti, and start a new life in Rome. Newspapers across Europe trumpet her Cinderella story and baffling successes, and the public demands to know:...read more

  • Lori Rich

    William Tyndale lived a life of adventure and danger, dodging the king's men, fleeing from his enemies and meeting with smugglers in the dead of night. What brought a well-educated young English man to such a state? Was he an outlaw? Was he a thief? No - he was a Bible smuggler and a brave one at that.Tyndale wanted other English speakers to be able to read God's word in their own language but there were many who tried to put a stop to that.However, Tyndale's work was God's work and it would not be stopped - even after Tyndale's death. One day there was a translation of the bible in the English language and it lit a fire in people's hearts that would not be put out.Read and learn about how...read more

  • Julia London

    Wicked intrigue unfolds as an unlikely marriage leads to a path of risky desire in the lush, green Scottish Highlands  Born into riches and groomed in English luxury, Margot Armstrong didn't belong in a Scottish chieftain's devil-may-care world. Three years ago she fled their marriage of convenience and hasn't looked back—except to relive the moments spent in wild, rugged Arran McKenzie's passionate embrace. But as their respective countries' fragile unity threatens to unravel, Margot must return to her husband to uncover his role in the treachery before her family can be accused of it.  Red-haired, green-eyed Margot was Arran's beautiful bride. Her loss has haunted...read more

  • Mary Stewart

    Mary Stewart's stunning Arthurian Saga that began with The Crystal Cave, The Hollow Hills, The Last Enchantment continues withThe Wicked Day, the story of the clash between King Arthur and his bastard son, MordredBorn of an incestuous relationship between King Arthur and his half sister, and prophesied by Merlin to kill Arthur, Mordred is stolen away from his mother and raised in secrecy by a kind couple on an isolated Orkney island in the hopes that he will defy his fate.Mordred, known to history as a traitor and a murderer, is no villain, but a quick-witted young man, with hopes and dreams of his own. But try as he might, Mordred cannot escape Merlin's prophecy.His mother, the evil...read more

  • Michael Reeves

    Five hundred years after the beginning of the Protestant Reformation, many people-Christians and non-Christians alike-view it as a conflict about issues that are no longer relevant to the church. But what if the Reformation still has something to teach us? What if the doctrines so vigorously debated and defended by the Reformers still matter today? In this accessible primer on the Reformation, Michael Reeves and Tim Chester introduce readers to eleven key questions raised by the Reformers. These questions continue to impact the church today-proving that the Reformation is much more than just a bit of history we can leave...read more

  • Marcus Nodder

    Our culture ignores it. Many within the church seem to be almost embarrassed by it. Many others understand that the cross of Christ is at the very heart of Christian faith and life. This short, readable book explains clearly and simply what the Bible, and Jesus himself, says about the cross, and how Christians should understand it...read more

  • Timothy J. Keller

    Since the days of the early church, Christians have struggled to understand the relationship between two seemingly contradictory concepts in the Bible: law and gospel. If, as the apostle Paul says, the law cannot save, what can it do? Is it merely an ancient relic from Old Testament Israel to be discarded? Or is it still valuable for Christians today? Helping modern Christians think through this complex issue, seasoned pastor and theologian Sinclair Ferguson carefully leads readers to rediscover an eighteenth-century debate that sheds light on this present-day doctrinal conundrum: the Marrow Controversy. After sketching the history of the debate, Ferguson moves on to discuss the theology...read more

  • N.T. Wright

    Did the historical person Jesus really regard himself as the Son of God? What did Jesus actually stand for? And what are we to make of the early Christian conviction that Jesus physically rose from the dead? In this book N. T. Wright considers these and many other questions raised by three controversial books about Jesus: Barbara Thiering's Jesus the Man, A. N. Wilson's Jesus: A Life, and John Shelby Spong'sBorn of a Woman. While Wright agrees with those authors that the real, historical Jesus has many surprises in store for institutional Christianity, he also presents solid reasons for discounting their arguments, claiming that they 'fail to reach anything like the right answer' as to who...read more

  • James Clavell

    Tehran, Iran 1979: Simmering religious tensions finally explode, and the Iranian people rise up against the Shah. The country, once secular, is now thrown back into an orthodoxy that threatens to tear it apart. The United States and Russia go on high alert, with warships heading to the Middle East. The region becomes a powder keg, waiting to explode. Caught up in the revolution are a British helicopter company and its pilots. The oil fields of Iran need helicopters to ferry workers and administrators, and when the main US aviation company pulls out of Iran fearing what might come next, S-G Helicopters steps in to fill the void. Soon they realize that they, too, must leave or risk losing all...read more

  • James Clavell

    The sixth book in James Clavell's epic Asian Saga tells the story of three weeks in Tehran in February 1979-three weeks of passion, self-sacrifice, and heartbreak. When the shah is thrown out of Iran, the nation's turmoil becomes world headlines. Caught in this shifting world of fanaticism, ambition, duplicity, and violent death are the foreign helicopter pilots who have been servicing the oil fields up and down the country. Their one objective is to make a bold, concerted escape to safety across the Gulf. "James Clavell does more than entertain. He transports us into worlds we've not known, stimulating, educating, questioning...a wonder of detail."-Washington...read more

  • Stewart Gordon

    While European intellectual, cultural, and commercial life stagnated during the early medieval period, Asia flourished as the wellspring of science, philosophy, and religion. Linked together by a web of religious, commercial, and intellectual connections, the different regions of Asia's vast civilization, from Arabia to China, hummed with commerce, international diplomacy, and the brisk exchange of ideas. Stewart Gordon has fashioned a fascinating and unique look at Asia from A.D. 700 to 1500, a time when Asia was the world, by describing the personal journeys of Asia's many travelers-the merchants who traded spices along the Silk Road, the apothecaries who exchanged medicine and...read more

  • Derek Perkins

    What exactly are we? The modern world has many answers to that question, each of which has consequences for the choices we make about our own life and the lives of others. In this short, simple book, Mark Meynell wants to help confused Christians understand what God has said about these questions in the scriptures, and offers a positive and liberating way forward as we discover what true humanity really...read more

  • Marcus Nodder

    We all have questions about death. Despite the strong assurance the Bible gives us about life beyond the grave, Christians are often troubled by other questions. What will happen on the day of judgement? Will we have bodies in heaven? Will there be rewards? These short, simple books are designed to help Christians understand what God has said about these questions in the scriptures. Suitable for all Christians - especially those with questions about...read more

  • Robert Child

    Weather and Warfare dramatically retraces the meteorological forces during battlefield engagements that doomed or saved civilizations. In 1588 more than half of the Spanish Armada, on its way around northern Britain, was destroyed by storms in retreat back to Spain. Napoleon’s attack on Russia was stopped cold by winter weather, as was Hitler’s siege of Leningrad. In WWI, it was all-quiet on the western front during mud season. The miracle at Dunkirk took place under cover of heavy fog, the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor was launched under cover of Pacific storms and the D-day invasion of Normandy was launched based on the most critical weather forecast in...read more

  • Robert Goddard

    From the Edgar award-winning, internationally bestselling British writer Robert Goddard comes a captivating new trilogy of historical thrillers, set at the tail end of World War I and featuring the devilishly charismatic James Max Maxted, a Royal Flying Corps veteran who has a hard time keeping himself out of trouble. Four years of horrific fighting have finally ended on the battlefield, but in the spring of 1919, Paris is filled with delegates from around the world who are still trying to hammer out the terms of peace. One such delegate is British diplomat Sir Henry Maxted, in charge of liaising with the Brazilians regarding seized ships. But before a deal is reached Sir Henry Maxted turns...read more

  • Philip Ball

    From the Yangtze to the Yellow River, China is traversed by great waterways, which have defined its politics and ways of life for centuries. Water has been so integral to China's culture, economy, and growth and development that it provides a window on the whole sweep of Chinese history. In The Water Kingdom, renowned writer Philip Ball opens that window to offer an epic and powerful new way of thinking about Chinese civilization. Water, Ball shows, is a key that unlocks much of Chinese culture. In The Water Kingdom, he takes us on a grand journey through China's past and present, showing how the complexity and energy of the country and its history repeatedly come back to the challenges,...read more