Searching for: "George Guidall"

  • Henry Chappell

    Spur Award finalist Henry Chappell writes compelling historical novels set in the Old West. In Blood Kin, he tells the story of Isaac Webb, a Texas Ranger caught up in the conflicts surrounding the fledgling Texas Republic. Tensions between the Texans and Comanches begin to mount, and Isaac is sent to negotiate a peace treaty. But, his efforts are hampered by threats of violence and bloodshed. Audie Award winner George Guidall gives a spirited reading to this action-packed...read more

  • Greg Bear

    Greg Bear's fiction ingeniously combines cutting-edge science and unforgettable characters. It has won multiple Hugo and Nebula Awards and choruses of critical acclaim. Now, with Darwin's Radio, Bear creates a nonstop thriller swirling with provocative ideas about the next step of human evolution. In a cave high in the Alps, a renegade anthropologist discovers a frozen Neanderthal couple-with a Homo sapiens baby. Meanwhile, in southern Russia, the U.N. investigation of a mysterious mass grave is cut short. One of the investigators, molecular biologist Kaye Lang, returns home to the U.S. to learn that her theory on human retroviruses has been verified with the discovery of SHEVA, a virus...read more

  • Cynthia Rylant

    Each of Cynthia Rylant's Henry and Mudge books gives young readers another chance to spend happy moments with the young boy and his enormous dog. The two friends' days are filled with sunshine and adventure. But there are always surprises waiting for them, too. One night, Henry and his parents find a stray cat on their doorstep. It's not a pretty cat, but it is very friendly. Once it meets Mudge, it is also a very happy cat. What will happen, now, if someone claims Mudge's scruffy new friend? George Guidall's narration brings out all the frisky, affectionate humor in Henry and Mudge and the Happy Cat. Young readers and their parents will laugh out loud at the gentle and unlikely bond...read more

  • Cynthia Rylant

    When Henry and his big dog Mudge see a spy kit for sale, they know right away that it's time to break open the piggy bank. With their spy hat and magnifying glass and secret code card, Henry and Mudge can flirt with danger, steal secrets, and start cracking codes. On their first spy mission, Henry tells Mudge to try not to look suspicious. Mudge rolls in the mud and chews on an old shoe, so no one will ever think he's a spy. But then Henry finds a piece of paper with a real spy code written on it. Can the two sneaky spies figure out who is leaving them messages? Cynthia Rylant's popular stories about a boy and his enormous best friend delight young readers and their parents with their...read more

  • Cynthia Rylant

    In January, there's a lot of snow on the ground. One day when Henry and his big dog Mudge go outside to play, they see a sign in a store window. It says: SNOWMAN CONTEST, SATURDAY AT THE PARK. Henry runs home to tell his dad. On Saturday, the park is filled with people building all kinds of fancy snowmen. There are many dogs there, too. While Mudge makes friends, Henry and his dad get to work. They will need to make a very unusual snowman to win this contest! Listeners of all ages love the Henry and Mudge series. Each adventure of the young boy and his enormous dog is one that teaches happy lessons about friendship and sharing. Audie Award-winning narrator George Guidall says these are some...read more

  • Cynthia Rylant

    Every August, Henry, his parents, and his big dog Mudge go camping. This year they are going to Bear Lake. They will cook food over a campfire and sleep in a tent. Henry hopes he sees a deer or a raccoon. But he isn't sure he wants to see a bear. After they set up camp, Henry and Mudge explore the woods and enjoy the lake. Henry and his parents eat hot dogs for dinner while Mudge chews on a big log. That night, as they all look up in the sky, they see thousands of stars. And when they go to sleep, they dream happy dreams that don't have any bears in them. The friendship between Henry and Mudge always includes time for surprises and snacks. Listeners of all ages love this best-selling...read more

  • Cynthia Rylant

    Henry and his big dog, Mudge, like to play outside. but when a thunderstorm begins, Mudge is unhappy. he wants to go inside. He wants to hide from the loud thunder and sharp lightning. Soon the storm is very windy and noisy, and the lights have gone out. As Mudge hides his head in the sofa, Henry and his parents light candles and play cards. Then, armed with a flashlight, Henry goes on a rescue mission. Each of the Henry and Mudge books, by the popular Newberry Award-winning author Cynthia Rylant, quickly becomes a favorite with young readers and their parents. With George Guidall's gentle and humorous narration, Henry and Mudge and the Wild Wind is sure to draw the listener into the...read more

  • Peter Matthiessen

    When Peter Matthiessen was 17, he was told the story of Edgar J. Watson, a popular and successful planter who had been murdered by his neighbors in 1910. This novel is Matthiessen's attempt to piece together the life of a mysterious man who became a legend, and the dangerous legend that destroyed him. During the Reconstruction Era, Edgar Watson grew up in the South at the mercy of a brutal alcoholic father and a vindictive mother. Witnessing the horrors of slavery, bilked out of his inheritance, and blamed in his youth for a murder he didn't commit, E.J. developed a reputation for violence that preceded him everywhere he went. Finally, it brought him to a tragic and bloody end as his family...read more

  • Christian Jacq

    An epic re-creation of the exhilarating and mysterious time when the Sun King ruled Egypt, Ramses, the Son of Light, has become the rage in France. With over two million copies sold, it is the greatest publishing phenomenon to hit the shelves there in 20 years. Rameses is only 14 when his father, the Pharaoh Seti, begins testing his true mettle. Being the younger of two sons, the proud Ramses has a problem with being relegated to second place. Now, with increasing attention from the Pharaoh, along with the formal and military education afforded him, he dares to hope that he may inherit the empire after all. This spell-binding novel of court intrigue, treason, and romantic adventure is a...read more

  • Anton Chekhov

    This group of four classic stories from the 19th century includes works that appear in many collections of European literature. Offering tantalizing revelations and unforgettable characters, these tales have delighted readers ever since they were first published. In Stephen Crane's The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky, glowing newlyweds find an unexpected ally on the dusty streets of an American frontier town. Ill-fated Christmas gifts cross paths in O.Henry's touching The Gift of the Magi. A bohemian artist uses a colorful image to save a young woman's life in another tale by O.Henry: The Last Leaf. And in The Lady With a Toy Dog, Anton Chekhov examines the terrible, tender snares of memory and...read more

  • Ph.D.

    This is the book that made Anthony E. Wolf, Ph.D. a best-selling author. Get Out of My Life, But First Could You Drive Me and Cheryl to the Mall? focuses on the legendary task all parents must face: raising teenagers. In this insightful and humorous audiobook, noted clinical psychologist Anthony Wolf digs into the mysteries of raising children aged 13 and up. This audiobook not only defines the physical and mental changes of growing up, but also illustrates ways to deal effectively with problems ranging from drug use to intermittent defiance. Dr. Wolf's positive, compassionate approach offers parents what they want most: effective methods to raise happy and successful teenagers. Whether you...read more

  • Max Byrd

    A respected authority on 18th-century literature, Max Byrd spent five years researching and creating this fast-paced historical novel. The result is an intriguing fictional portrait of an enigmatic and powerful personality. When Thomas Jefferson assumed his post as American ambassador to the court of France's Louis XVI in 1784, he faced daunting political and personal challenges. In the midst of Europe's social and political upheaval, the future president struggled to get his young country accepted as a serious trade nation. As he collaborated in Paris with compatriots John Adams and Ben Franklin to build the America of his dreams, he faced grave criticism. How could he profess individual...read more

  • David L. Robbins

    The battle at Stalingrad during World War II has been called the bloodiest campaign in the history of war. Success was measured in meters, and corpses piled high amidst the charred wreckage of the Russian city. In this grisly setting, David L. Robbins stages an unforgettable contest. On the Russian side is Zaitsev, the Hare, who has been trained since childhood in hunting and tracking. As a sniper, he kills a German with each bullet. Berlin has sent its best marksman, the Headmaster, to find and kill the Hare. The Headmaster's accuracy is phenomenal, and his cunning is legendary. In the ensuing battle of skill and wit between the two deadly soldiers, lives hang on a second's hesitation or...read more

  • John Irving

    Ruth Cole is a complex, often self-contradictory character--a "difficult" woman.  By no means is she conventionally "nice," but she will never be forgotten. Ruth's story is told in three parts, each focusing on a crucial time in her life.  When we first meet her--on Long Island, in the summer of 1958--Ruth is only four. The second window into Ruth's life opens in the fall of 1990, when Ruth is an unmarried woman whose personal life is not nearly as successful as her literary career.  She distrusts her judgment in men, for good reason. A Widow for One Year closes in the autumn of 1995, when Ruth Cole is a forty-one-year-old widow and...read more

  • Dava Sobel

    Galileo Galilei was the foremost scientist of his day. Though he never left Italy, his inventions and discoveries were heralded around the world. His telescopes allowed him to reveal the heavens and enforce the astounding argument that the earth moves around the sun. For this belief, he was brought before the Holy Office of the Inquisition, accused of heresy, and forced to spend his last years under house arrest. Galileo's oldest child was thirteen when he placed her in a convent near him in Florence, where she took the most appropriate name of Suor Maria Celeste. Her support was her father's greatest source of strength. Her presence, through letters which Sobel has translated from...read more

  • Robert Silverberg

    Another story of Roma Eterna. A Roman nobleman is sent in punishment to a remote corner of the Empire–the Arabian city we know as...read more

  • Frederick Forsyth

    An extraordinary cutting-edge suspense novel from the 'king of the pack' (The Washington Times), #1 New York Times bestselling author Frederick Forsyth. In northern Virginia, a secret agency named TOSA (Technical Operations Support Activity) has one mission: to track, find, and kill those so dangerous to the United States that they are on a short, very close-held document known as the Kill List. Now a new name has been added: a terrorist of frightening effectiveness called the Preacher, who radicalizes young Muslims living abroad to carry out assassinations. Unfortunately for him, one of his targets is a retired Marine general, whose son is TOSA’s top tracker of men. The...read more

  • Terry Lenzner

    “A time capsule of adventuresome sleuthing [that] traces the contours of U. S. political history.” —The Washington Post The Los Angeles Times once called Terry Lenzner “one of the most powerful and dreaded private investigators in the world.” Since graduating from Harvard Law School, Lenzner has investigated the infamous murder of three civil rights workers that inspired Mississippi Burning, prosecuted organized crime in New York, followed the money trail that led to the Watergate burglary, helped identify the Unabomber, investigated the circumstances of Princess Diana’s death, and worked with President Clinton’s defense team during the...read more

  • Jean Zimmerman

    From a debut novelist, a gripping historical thriller and rousing love story set in seventeenth-century ManhattanIt’s 1663 in the tiny, hardscrabble Dutch colony of New Amsterdam, now present-day southern Manhattan. Orphan children are going missing, and among those looking into the mysterious state of affairs are a quick-witted twenty-two-year-old trader, Blandine von Couvering, herself an orphan, and a dashing British spy named Edward Drummond. Suspects abound, including the governor’s wealthy nephew, a green-eyed aristocrat with decadent tastes; an Algonquin trapper who may be possessed by a demon that turns people into cannibals; and the colony’s own corrupt and...read more

  • John Steinbeck

    Occupied by enemy troops, a small, peaceable town comes face-to-face with evil imposed from the outside--and betrayal born within the close-knit community. Originally published at the zenith of Nazi Germanyâ's power, this masterful fable uncovers profound, often unsettling truths about war--and about human nature. Steinbeck's self-described 'celebration of the durability of democracy' had an extraordinary impact as Allied propaganda in Nazi-occupied Europe. Despite Axis efforts to suppress it (in Fascist Italy, mere possession of the book was punishable by death), The Moon Is Down was secretly translated into French, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Swedish, German, Italian, and...read more