Searching for: "Grover Gardner"

  • Will Durant

    The product of eleven years of research, The Story of Philosophy is an endlessly inspiring and instructive chronicle of the world’s greatest thinkers, from Socrates to Santayana. Written with exacting and scrupulous scholarship, it was designed both to command the respect of educators and to capture the interest of the layman. Durant lucidly describes the philosophical systems of such world-famous “monarchs of the mind” as Plato, Aristotle, Francis Bacon, Spinoza, Kant, Voltaire, and Nietzsche. Along with their ideas, he offers their flesh-and-blood biographies, placing their thoughts within their own time and place and elucidating their influence on our modern...read more

  • Andrea Camilleri

    Inspector Salvatore Montalbano wakes from strange dreams to find a gruesomely bludgeoned horse carcass in front of his seaside home. When his men come to investigate, the carcass has disappeared, leaving only a trail in the sand. Then his home is ransacked, and the inspector is certain that the crimes are linked. As he negotiates both the glittering underworld of horseracing and the Mafia’s connection to it, Montalbano is aided by his illiterate housekeeper, Adelina, and a Proustian memory of linguate fritte. Longtime fans and new readers alike will be charmed by Montalbano’s blend of unorthodox methods, melancholy self-reflection, and love of good...read more

  • Karleen Koen

    New York Times bestselling author Karleen Koen offers another delightful historical novel that will transport you to another time and place. Louis XIV is one of the best-known monarchs ever to grace the French throne. But what was he like as a young man-the man before Versailles? After the death of his prime minister, Cardinal Mazarin, twenty-two-year-old Louis steps in to govern France. He's still a young man, but one who, as king, willfully takes everything he can get-including his brother's wife. As the love affair between Louis and Princess Henriette burns, it sets the kingdom on the road to unmistakable scandal and conflict with the Vatican. Every woman wants him. He must face what...read more

  • Andrea Camilleri

    Witty and entertaining, the Montalbano novels by Andrea Camilleri—a master of the Italian detective story—have become favorites of mystery fans everywhere. In this latest installment, an unidentified corpse is found near Vigàta, a town known for its soil rich with potter’s clay. Meanwhile, a woman reports the disappearance of her husband, a Colombian man with Sicilian origins who turns out to be related to a local mobster. Then Inspector Montalbano remembers the story from the Bible—Judas’ betrayal, the act of remorse, and the thirty pieces of silver for the potter’s field, where those of unknown or foreign origin are to be buried—and slowly,...read more

  • Mark Twain

    In 1861, young Mark Twain found himself adrift as a tenderfoot in the Wild West. Roughing It is a hilarious record of his travels over a six-year period that comes to life with his inimitable mixture of reporting, social satire, and rollicking tall tales. Twain reflects on his scuffling years mining silver in Nevada, working at a Virginia City newspaper, being down-and-out in San Francisco, reporting for a newspaper from Hawaii, and more. This humorous account is a patchwork of personal anecdotes and tall tales, many of them told in the “vigorous new vernacular” of the West. Selling seventy-five thousand copies within a year of its publication in 1872, Roughing It was greeted...read more

  • Ross MacDonald

    Ross Macdonald is one of the “Big Three” in American hard-boiled detective fiction, along with Chandler and Hammett. In The Barbarous Coast, tough, thoughtful private eye Lew Archer pursues a girl who jackknifed too suddenly from high diving to high living. Archer’s investigation leads him to an ex-fighter with an unexplained movie contract, a big-time gambler who died by his own knife, and finally, to an answer he would rather not have...read more

  • Ross MacDonald

    In this masterful Macdonald mystery, the desert air is hot with sex and betrayal, death and madness, and only Lew Archer can make sense of a killer who makes murder a work of art. The era is the 1970s, the settin, Southern California. Private investigator Lew Archer has been hired to retrieve a stolen canvas reputed to be the work of the celebrated Richard Chantry, who vanished in 1950 from his home in Santa Teresa. It is the portrait of an unknown woman. Suddenly, Archer finds himself drawn into a web of family complications and masked brutalities stretching back fifty years, through a world where money both talks or buys silence; where social prominence is a murderous weapon; where,...read more

  • Mark Sundeen

    A Walden for the 21st century, the true story of a man who has radically reinvented 'the good life.' In 2000, Daniel Suelo left his life savings-all thirty dollars of it-in a phone booth. He has lived without money-and with a newfound sense of freedom and security-ever since. The Man Who Quit Money is an account of how one man learned to live, sanely and happily, without earning, receiving, or spending a single cent. Suelo doesn't pay taxes, or accept food stamps or welfare. He lives in caves in the Utah canyonlands, forages wild foods and gourmet discards. He no longer even carries an I.D. Yet he manages to amply fulfill not only the basic human needs-for shelter, food, and warmth-but,...read more

  • Ross MacDonald

    Lew Archer knew he shouldn’t have taken the case, but Alex Kincaid seemed so desperate. Kincaid’s loving new bride Dolly had just inexplicably walked out on him, leaving Kincaid more than a little fearful for her sanity—and her safety. So Archer reluctantly agreed to help Kincaid find her. But what he found instead was enough to send a chill down anyone’s spine—a new fresh corpse and evidence linking Dolly not only to this murder but to a series of others dating back to before she was even born. Winner of the Mystery Writer of America Grand Master Award, Ross Macdonald is acknowledged around the world as one of the greatest mystery writers of our time and is labeled as one of...read more

  • Elleston Trevor

    They are twelve men who shouldn't be alive. They have survived the sudden blinding sandstorm that crippled their air freighter; survived a desperate crash landing in the Sahara of Central Libya; survived to face the slow, dry, agonizing death of the desert, for no rescue plans will seek their unscheduled flight. Twelve men with one hope: to build a new plane from the wreckage of their Skytruck and make a flight out of hell, two hundred miles to the nearest oasis. Only one man could build such a plane: Stringer, the brilliant and obsessed engineer. Only one man could fly it: Towns, the arrogant and tormented pilot. Both had been aboard the Skytruck, but both are mortal enemies whose...read more

  • Alex Ross

    The scandal over modern music has not died down. While modern paintings by Picasso and Pollock sell for a hundred million or more, shocking musical works from Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring onward still send ripples of unease through audiences; yet the influence of modern sound can be felt everywhere. Alex Ross, music critic for the New Yorker, shows how modern music has pervaded every corner of twentieth-century life. The Rest Is Noise takes the listener inside the labyrinth of modern sound, from turn-of-the-century Vienna to bohemian Paris, from Hitler’s Germany and Stalin’s Russia to downtown New York in the sixties and seventies. We meet the maverick personalities who...read more

  • Lois McMaster Bujold

    Captain Ivan Vorpatril is happy with his relatively uneventful bachelor's life as a staff officer to a Barrayaran admiral.Cousin to imperial troubleshooter Miles Vorkosigan, Ivan is not far down the hereditary list for the emperorship.Thankfully, new heirs have directed that headache elsewhere, leaving Ivan to enjoy his life on Komarr, far from the byzantine court politics of his home system.But when an old friend in Barrayaran intelligence asks Ivan to protect an attractiveyoung woman who may be on the hit list of a criminal syndicate, his chivalrous nature takes over. It seems danger and adventure have once more found Captain Vorpatril. Tej Arqua and her half-sister and servant Rish...read more

  • Charles H. Spurgeon

    One contemporary scholar and authority on Spurgeon says of this work: 'Next to Mr. Spurgeon's great literary work, The Treasury of David, we consider (these) Lectures to My Students his greatest single contribution to the Christian world. There is more practical wisdom, common sense and sage advice packed within these pages than with any other book of similar size, or content.' This complete and unabridged edition of Spurgeon's great work will make it possible for today's generation to appreciate Spurgeon's combination of discerning wit and refreshingly practical advice. Included in the twenty-eight chapters of this classic volume are lectures such as: - The Call to Ministry - The...read more

  • David Graeber

    A bold rethinking of the most powerful political idea in the world—democracy—and the story of how radical democracy can yet transform America   Democracy has been the American religion since before the Revolution—from New England town halls to the multicultural democracy of Atlantic pirate ships. But can our current political system, one that seems responsive only to the wealthiest among us and leaves most Americans feeling disengaged, voiceless, and disenfranchised, really be called democratic? And if the tools of our democracy are not working to solve the rising crises we face, how can we—average citizens—make change happen?   David Graeber,...read more

  • Zbigniew Brzezinski

    In 1991, the United States was the only global superpower. It seemed that the 21st century, like the 20th, would belong to America. Then came the stock market bubble, the costly foreign unilateralism of the younger Bush presidency, and the financial catastrophe of 2008. Meanwhile, China was rising and the Middle East was awakening politically. Today it is clear that America is vulnerable-to domestic and international decline and unregulated greed.   Speaking from decades of experience, Brzezinski considers the implications of the changing distribution of global power, ponders why America’s global appeal is waning, speculates on the likely geopolitical consequences if America...read more

  • William R. Forstchen

    A towering epic torank with Douglas Preston's Blasphemy and Michael Crichton's Prey Pandemic drought, skyrocketing oil prices, dwindling energysupplies, and wars of water scarcity threaten the planet. Only four people canprevent global chaos. Gary Morgan-a brilliant renegade scientist pilloried bythe scientific community for his belief in a space elevator: a pillar to thesky, which he believes will make space flight fast, simple, and affordable. Eva Morgan-a brilliant and beautiful scientist of Ukranian descent,she has had a lifelong obsession to build a pillar to the sky, a vertiginoustower that would mine the power of the sun and supply humanity with cheap,limitless energy...read more

  • W.P. Kinsella

    Gideon Clarke is a man on a quest. He is out to prove to the world, as his father tried before him, that the world-champion Chicago Cubs traveled to Onamata, Iowa, in the summer of 1908 for an exhibition game against all-stars from the Iowa Baseball Confederacy, an amateur league. The game, which was to be short, pleasant, and, the Cubs thought, one-sided, turned into a titanic battle of over two thousand innings, played mostly in the pouring rain. This game is not on the record books. No one remembers it or the Confederacy. But Gideon Clarke knows it happened, and he is determined to set the record straight. Like in his previous novel, Shoeless Joe, which was the basis for the movie...read more

  • Joseph Wheelan

    A unique and compelling examination of the Civil War's "turningpoint"-forty crucial days in the spring of 1864 that turned the tide for theUnion In the spring of 1864, Robert E. Lee faced a new adversary:Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant. Named commander of all Union armies inMarch, Grant quickly went on the offensive against Lee in Virginia. On May 4 Grant's army struck hard across the Rapidan River into north central Virginia,with Lee's army contesting every mile. They fought for forty days until,finally, the Union army crossed the James River and began the siege ofPetersburg. The campaign cost ninety thousand men-the largest loss thewar had seen. While Grant lost nearly twice as many...read more

  • Christian D. Larson

    Originally published in 1912, this classic piece of literature by best-selling author Christian Larson unfolds the path to a spiritual life. Retaining the special flavor of early twentieth century language, The Pathway of Roses provides just the right combination of inspiration and heart-pondering sentiment to speak to the heart of almost anyone seeking the meaning of the life as it relates to the spiritual realm. As the original book states, 'THIS book has been written especially for those awakened souls, so numerous in this rare century, who would open their minds to all that is rich, all that is lofty, all that is beautiful, and all that is inspiring in life; who would know and...read more

  • R.C. Sproul

    Many people react negatively to the word theology, believing that it involves dry, fruitless arguments about minute points of doctrine. Yet as Dr. R.C. Sproul argues,everyone is a theologian. Any time we think about a teaching of the Bible and strive to understand it, we are engaging in theology. Therefore, it is important that we put the Bible's varied teachings together in a systematic fashion, using proper, time-tested methods of interpretation so as to arrive at a theology that is founded on truth. That is precisely what Dr. Sproul does in Everyone's a Theologian: An Introduction to Systematic Theology. This book is anything but a dry discussion of minute points of doctrine. Dr. Sproul,...read more