Searching for: "John McDonough"

  • William Murray

    Open your eyes to one of the greatest naturalist writers of all time with these two short stories by William H.H. Murray. These stories, featuring John Norton, the trapper, were so well loved, that Murray performed them more than 500 times, on book tours in New England and New York. Written at the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, Murray's stories of the Adirondack wilderness of the 1860s made outdoor activities like hiking and camping popular for the first time. These stories not only created an audience for writers like Jack London, but also spawned the booming outdoor recreation industries of today. Murray's timeless words paired with John McDonough's vibrant narration make Christmas in...read more

  • Walter R. Brooks

    While Freddy the pig relaxes in his best cowboy outfit and sings a song, he decides that he needs a vacation. He will ride his pony, Cy, out West. He'll see some wide-open spaces and maybe find some excitement. But before Freddy can leave, the excitement finds him first. Uncle Ben races up to the farm and asks Freddy for help. A pack of sneaky spies is trying to steal Uncle Ben's plans for building a flying saucer. Soon, Freddy is riding into one of the wildest adventures of his life, one that will require his most clever disguises! In the Freddy the Pig books, generations of children have enjoyed the chubby but poetic detective and his animal friends on the Bean Farm. Narrator John...read more

  • Walter R. Brooks

    A series of robberies has disrupted the peaceful life at the Bean Farm. First, food disappears from The First Animal Bank. Then sheets and shirts vanish from a clothesline. By the time oats are stolen from the barn, everyone is suspicious and upset. Soon, the animals even suspect Freddy! Who, or what, is responsible for the crimes? What is the mysterious white shape in the Great Woods? When the animals get threatening letters demanding food in exchange for their safety, it's up to Freddy to solve the mystery of the Ignormus-even if it means going into the Great Woods alone. The Freddy books are beloved classics of children's literature. With their lively friendships and adventures, the...read more

  • Walter R. Brooks

    Acclaimed author Walter R. Brooks is beloved for his Freddy series. In this tale, Freddy and his friends decide to take a trip to Mars. However, things go a little haywire, and Freddy and his pals are knocked off track. This is when the fun begins. John McDonough's festive narration makes listeners feel a part of Freddy's crew to...read more

  • Walter R. Brooks

    The barnyard animals are tired of being cold in the winter. Since Farmer Bean doesn't have enough money to patch the holes in the barn or heat the chicken coop, they are migrating to Florida for the winter. Travelling to the beat of Freddy the pig's funny songs, they meet with one adventure after another. They find gold treasure to take home to Farmer Bean in the spring. Florida is fun, except for the time when alligators try to eat them for lunch. Only Freddy's cleverness lets them escape with their lives. Writing during the first half of the 20th century, Walter R. Brooks captured the idyllic America that disappeared with the 1950s. Fans remember him as the creator of Mr. Ed, the talking...read more

  • Walter R. Brooks

    This heriloom book about a renaissance pig is lovingly passed from generation to generation, and is an authentic American classic. Freddy the Pig knows the rats have stolen the missing toy train. Now he has to find where it is hidden and convict the rats of the crime. Who will win Freddy's first case, the sly, scheming rats or the honorable Freddy? Narrator John McDonough captures the wonderful wordplay, memorable characters, and laugh-out-loud good humor found in this timeless...read more

  • Jim Murphy

    Award-winning author Jim Murphy whisks you back in time to witness the disastrous 1871 Chicago Fire. He depicts the tragedy so vividly, you can almost feel the scorching heat and hear the roar of the blaze as it reduces the bustling city to a smoldering wasteland. On a warm Sunday evening, a fire breaks out in a barn. No one worries about it-fires are common in Chicago. But soon a sea of flames is sweeping up and down the streets, devouring everything in its path. People pour into the roads, hoping to outrun the raging inferno. Their shouts ring through the night as wind carries crackling tongues of fire ahead of them, blocking their chance of escape. Weaving together accounts of actual...read more

  • Cynthia Rylant

    Christmas is Mr. Putter's favorite time of the year. He starts thinking about Christmas presents in July. It's easy to buy gifts for the postman, the grocer, and the librarian. But he has to think very hard about a gift for his neighbor, Mrs. Teaberry. Mrs. Teaberry likes strange things. She likes coconuts that look like monkey heads and tiny dresses that fit her teapots. She even likes fruitcake. That's it! He'll make her a good cake for Christmas, a light and airy one that won't break her toe if she drops it. He's never baked a cake before, but it should be a cinch. Among the delightful creations of this popular Newbery Medal honoree, Mr. Putter is perhaps the most comical and endearing....read more

  • Cynthia Rylant

    In Mr. Putter and Tabby Walk the Dog, Mr. Putter was dragged through the neighborhood and wrapped around trees when he helped Mrs. Teaberry with her dog. So when Mrs. Teaberry telephones Mr. Putter to tell him about a brilliant idea, he gets a little nervous. Besides, sometimes her ideas involve "running fast or wearing feathers." Mrs. Teaberry wants to take an afternoon train ride with Mr. Putter and their pets, Tabby and Zeke. Mrs. Teaberry hasn't ridden the train since 1938, so when they get to the train station, she is surprised to find that pets aren't allowed to ride. Now it's Mr. Putter's turn to think of a good idea. Cynthia Rylant's humorous characters and situations ensure great...read more

  • Kenneth Oppel

    Shade, a young silverwing bat, is the runt of his colony. Determined to show how brave he is, Shade breaks one of the ancient rules that governs the bats. As punishment, owls burn the bats' roost, forcing them to migrate earlier than normal. While on the trip south to the Hibernaculum, Shade becomes separated from his flock during a rain storm. His destination is millions of wing beats away. Now he must find a way to make the journey on his own. Along the way, he'll meet up with bats of different species--some friendly, some not. Shade will have to learn quickly which ones to trust if he's ever going to see his family again. A Smithsonian Notable Book for Children, Silverwing combines...read more

  • Kenneth Oppel

    Shade, a young silverwing bat, is searching the countryside for his father when he discovers a huge glass building. When he flies inside, he finds a forest haven where, safe from predatory owls, hundreds of bats are finally living in the sunlight. But when he tries to find an exit, Shade quickly realizes that instead of a paradise, the building is really a prison. From there, bats are taken to laboratories, where they are fitted with bombs and used in human warfare. Even as Shade manages to escape, he knows that the fate of his entire species is in great peril. It's up to him to foil the dark force that plots against the silverwings. Sunwing is the exciting continuation of Silverwing, which...read more

  • Marguerite Henry

    Brighty, a shaggy young burro, lives wild and free in the Grand Canyon of Arizona. He roams the steep cliffs with the squirrels and rabbits. But his favorite friend is Old Timer, the prospector who shares hot biscuits and calls him Bright Angel. One day Old Timer doesn't answer Brighty's loud 'Eeeee-aw!' Instead, the friendly animal encounters a ruthless claim jumper. Will Brighty be able to bring the killer to justice and make the wilderness safe again? Marguerite Henry, author of the Newbery Award-winning classic Misty of Chincoteague, Based this delightful story on the adventures of a real-life Grand Canyon burro. Brighty touched the hearts of all who knew him -even President Teddy...read more

  • Henry James

    Henry James' stories are classic gems of subtle wit and irony. Set in the exacting social landscape of New York City at the turn of the century, Washington Square is the tale of a wealthy but shy young woman caught between conflicting family expectations. John McDonough's warm narration traces her remarkable inner...read more

  • Jack Myers

    Have you ever wondered what makes popcorn pop? One second a kernel is sitting there, tiny and hard as a rock. Next thing you know, it bursts into a fluffy and delicious snack. If you're curious about this or any of the other mysteries surrounding us every day, then What Makes Popcorn Pop? is the book for you. For example, if salt isn't hot, then how come we use it to melt ice in the winter? Where exactly does wind come from, and how come we can't see it? Why is the sky blue? And while we're on the subject, why are lakes and oceans blue-is it because they reflect the sky? The answers to these questions and dozens more are explained in this fun book from Jack Myers, longtime science editor of...read more

  • William Steig

    Wizzil the witch is very, very bored. When her bossy parrot suggests that she find someone to bother, Wizzil turns herself into a fly and buzzes off to do some mischief to the funky Frimp family. But mischief has a way of backfiring, and one spell often leads to another. It's not long before Wizzil has changed so much, she can hardly recognize herself. The zany witch's misadventures, and the sunny conclusion to her story, will quickly have you laughing out loud. Beloved author and cartoonist William Steig, winner of many Newbery and Caldecott awards, has delighted readers of all ages with books like Sylvester and the Magic Pebble and The Mud Flat Mystery. Enhanced by John McDonough's...read more

  • William Steig

    Sylvester is a rock collector. One day he finds a magic pebble that makes wishes come true. He rushes home to share his good fortune with his parents. On the way, he's frightened by a hungry lion and quickly asks the pebble to turn him into a rock, so the lion can't eat him. It works-but there sits Sylvester on Strawberry Hill with no way to hold the pebble to wish himself back into a donkey. Seasons come and go as Sylvester's parents desperately search for him. One fine spring day Mom and Dad decide that a picnic on Strawberry Hill might be just the thing to cheer them up. Will Mr. and Mrs. Duncan ever guess what happened to their little donkey? Narrator John McDonough playfully conveys a...read more

  • Roberta Karim

    By 6 a.m. at Cloverleaf Hospital, young patient Filbert MacFee is ready to go home. He doesn't need any more bed rest. He doesn't want any more shots or x-rays. And he just can't stand any more medicine. How can Filbert fight off the nurses, technicians and doctors when all he has to help him is a box of animal crackers? And how can the little boy convince these grownups to let him go home? Roberta Karim has created a hilarious animal tale that captures the wishes of every child who has even spent time in a hospital. Filbert MacFee's adventures are sure to have young readers and their parents laughing out loud. When John McDonough's richly comic narration is pared with the lively text, the...read more

  • Mary Elise Monsell

    Chocolate-loving penguin detective Mr. Pin is relaxing between cases when a client approaches him with a baffling problem-someone is smashing the stone gargoyles in his warehouse. In fact, all over Chicago, gargoyles are falling from the buildings. Hoping to stop the villain before someone gets hurt, Mr. Pin and his young friend Maggie scamper to the latest crime scene to collect clues. But when an empty chocolate box is found near a destroyed statue, and a rock hopper penguin is seen scuttling away, police blame Mr. Pin. The flippered detective must find the culprit-quickly-or lose his reputation and more. As he munches his way through the chocolate clues in two exciting cases, Mary Elise...read more

  • John Steinbeck

    'Steinbeck is an artist; and he tells stories of these lovable thieves and adulterers with a gentle and poetic purity of heart and of prose.'--New York Herald Tribune Adopting the structure and themes of the Arthurian legend, Steinbeck created a Camelot on a shabby hillside above the town of Monterey, California, and peopled it with a colorful band of knights. At the center of the tale is Danny, whose house, like Arthur's castle, becomes a gathering place for men looking for adventure, camaraderie, and a sense of belonging--men who fiercely resist the corrupting tide of honest toil and civil rectitude. As Steinbeck chronicles their deeds--their multiple lovers, their wonderful brawls,...read more

  • Jan Karon

    All good things—even laughter and orange marmalade cake—must come to an end  And in Light from Heaven, the long-anticipated final volume in the phenomenally successful Mitford Years series, Karon deftly ties up all the loose ends of Father Timothy Kavanagh’s deeply affecting life. On a century-old valley farm where Father Tim and Cynthia are housesitting, there’s plenty to say grace over, from the havoc of a windstorm to a surprising new addition to the household and a mystery in the chicken house. It’s life on the mountaintop, however, that promises to give Father Tim the definitive challenge of his long priesthood. Can he step up to the plate...read more