Searching for: "Kenneth Elliot"

  • Thomas More

    Why Political Science Classics Collection is so important? In today's world, providing quality training for the younger generation at colleges and universities is of primary importance. But higher education is not enough. Any graduate is first and foremost a citizen of his nation. He has the right to be an actor in the political life of his society. The political changes taking place today in the modern world are dependent on the civic stance of each person. In this way, a serious challenge facing the world system of higher education is to educate citizens who are capable of navigating and influencing the modern political processes in his country. Youth today actively participate in...read more

  • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

    'The Cats of Ulthar' is a short story written by American fantasy author H.P. Lovecraft in June 1920. In the tale, an unnamed narrator relates the story of how a law forbidding the killing of cats came to be in a town called Ulthar. As the narrative goes, the city is home to an old couple who enjoy capturing and killing the townspeople's cats. When a caravan of wanderers passes through the city, the kitten of an orphan (Menes) traveling with the band disappears. Upon hearing of the couple's violent acts towards cats, Menes invokes a prayer before leaving town that causes the local felines to swarm the cat-killers' house and devour them. Upon witnessing the result, the local politicians...read more

  • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

    'The Other Gods' is a fantasy short story written by American author H. P. Lovecraft, on August 14, 1921. It was first published in the November 1933 issue of The Fantasy Fan. Barzai the Wise, a high priest and prophet greatly learned in the lore of the 'gods of earth', or Great Ones, attempts to scale the mountain of Hatheg-Kla in order to look upon their faces, accompanied by his young disciple Atal. Upon reaching the peak, Barzai at first seems overjoyed until he finds that the 'gods of the earth' are not there alone, but rather are overseen by the 'other gods, the gods of the outer hells that guard the feeble gods of earth!' Atal flees, and Barzai is never seen again. Famous works of...read more

  • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

    'Dagon' is a short story by American author H. P. Lovecraft. It was written in July 1917 and is one of the first stories that Lovecraft wrote as an adult. It was first published in the November 1919 edition of The Vagrant. Dagon was later published in Weird Tales. It is considered by many to be one of Lovecraft's most forward-looking stories. The story is the testament of a tortured, morphine-addicted man who relates an incident that occurred during his service as an officer during World War I. In the unnamed narrator's account, his cargo ship is captured by an Imperial German sea-raider in 'one of the most open and least frequented parts of the broad Pacific'. He escapes on a lifeboat and...read more

  • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

    'The Outsider' is a short story by American horror writer H. P. Lovecraft. Written between March and August 1921, it was first published in Weird Tales, April 1926. In this work, a mysterious individual who has been living alone in a castle for as long as he can remember decides to break free in search of human contact and light. 'The Outsider' is one of Lovecraft's most commonly reprinted works and is also one of the most popular stories ever to be published in Weird Tales. 'The Outsider' combines horror, fantasy, and gothic fiction to create a nightmarish story, containing themes of loneliness, the abhuman, and the afterlife. Its epigram is from John Keats' 1819 poem 'The Eve of St....read more

  • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

    'The Transition of Juan Romero' is a short story by American horror fiction writer H. P. Lovecraft, written on September 16, 1919, and first published in the 1944 Arkham House volume Marginalia. The story involves a mine that uncovers a very deep chasm, too deep for any sounding lines to hit bottom. The night after the discovery of the abyss the narrator and one of the mine's workers, a Latino called Juan Romero, venture inside the mine, drawn against their will by a mysterious rhythmical throbbing in the ground. Romero reaches the abyss first and is swallowed by it. The narrator peers over the edge, sees something - 'but God, I dare not tell you what I saw!' and loses consciousness. That...read more

  • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

    'The Picture in the House' is a short story written by H.P. Lovecraft. It was written on December 12, 1920, and first published in the July issue of The National Amateur—which was published in the summer of 1921. While riding on his bicycle in the Miskatonic Valley of rural New England, a genealogist seeks shelter from an approaching storm in an apparently abandoned house, only to find that it is occupied by a 'loathsome old, white-bearded, and ragged man,' speaking in 'an extreme form of Yankee dialect...thought long extinct.' The narrator notices that the house is full of antique books, exotic artifacts, and furniture predating the American Revolution. The old man is apparently...read more

  • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

    'The Festival' is a short story by H. P. Lovecraft written in October 1923 and published in the January 1925 issue of Weird Tales. The story was inspired by Lovecraft's first trip to Marblehead, Massachusetts, in December 1922. Lovecraft later called that visit 'the most powerful single emotional climax experienced during my nearly forty years of existence.' In a flash all the past of New England—all the past of Old England—all the past of Anglo-Saxondom and the Western World--swept over me and identified me with the stupendous totality of all things in such a way as it never did before and never did again. That was the high tide of my life. The narrator's path through Kingsport...read more

  • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

    'The Tomb' is a fictional short story by American writer H. P. Lovecraft, written in June 1917 and first published in the March 1922 issue of The Vagrant. It tells the story of Jervas Dudley, who becomes obsessed with a mausoleum near his childhood home. 'The Tomb' tells of Jervas Dudley, a confessed daydreamer. While still a child, he discovers the padlocked entrance to a mausoleum belonging to the Hyde family, whose nearby mansion had burnt down many years previously. Jervas attempts to break the padlock, but is unable. Dispirited, he takes to sleeping beside the tomb. Eventually, inspired by reading Plutarch's Lives, Dudley decides to patiently wait until it is his time to gain entrance...read more

  • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

    'The Silver Key' is a fantasy short story by American writer H. P. Lovecraft. Written in 1926, it is considered part of his Dreamlands series. It was first published in the January 1929 issue of Weird Tales. It is a continuation of 'The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath', and was followed by a sequel, 'Through the Gates of the Silver Key', co-written with E. Hoffmann Price. The story and its sequel both feature Lovecraft's recurring character of Randolph Carter as the protagonist. Randolph Carter discovers, at the age of 30, that he has gradually 'lost the key to the gate of dreams.' Randolph once believed life is made up of nothing but pictures in memory, whether they be from real life or...read more

  • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

    'The Temple' is a short story written by H. P. Lovecraft in 1920, and first published in the pulp magazine Weird Tales #24 in September 1925. The story is narrated as a 'found manuscript' penned by Karl Heinrich, Graf von Altberg-Ehrenstein, a lieutenant-commander in the Imperial German Navy during the days of World War I. Altberg begins by declaring that he has decided to document the events leading up to his untimely end in order to 'set certain facts' before the public, aware that he will not survive to do so himself. In the North Atlantic, after sinking a British freighter and its occupied lifeboats, the cruel and arrogant Altberg commands his U-boat to submerge, surfacing later to...read more

  • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

    'The Rats in the Walls' is a short story by American author H. P. Lovecraft. Written in August–September 1923, it was first published in Weird Tales, March 1924. In 1923, an American named Delapore, the last descendant of the De la Poer family, moves to his ancestral estate in England following the death of his only son during World War I. To the dismay of nearby residents, he restores the estate, called Exham Priory. After moving in, Delapore and his cat frequently hear the sounds of rats scurrying behind the walls. Upon investigating further, and through recurring dreams, Delapore learns that his family maintained an underground city for centuries, where they raised generations of...read more

  • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

    'The Haunter of the Dark' is a horror short story by American author H. P. Lovecraft, written between 5-9 November 1935 and published in the December 1936 edition of Weird Tales. It was the last-written of the author's known works, and is part of the Cthulhu Mythos. The epigraph to the story is the second stanza of Lovecraft's 1917 poem 'Nemesis'. In Providence, Rhode Island, Robert Blake, a young writer with an interest in the occult, becomes fascinated by a large disused church on Federal Hill which he can see from his lodgings on the city's Upper East side. His researches reveal that the church has a sinister history involving a cult called the Church of Starry Wisdom and is dreaded by...read more

  • Sun Tzu

    The Art of War, literally The Laws of War by Master Sun is the most famous ancient Chinese treatise, dedicated to a military strategy and policy, written by Sun Tzu. The treatise by Sun Tzu influenced crucially on a whole military art of the East. Although it is the first treatise on the military art, it includes clearly expressed common principles of strategy as well as tactics. A special place in a military theoretical literature belongs to comments on Sun Tzu, the earliest of which appeared in the Han era (206-220 AD), and the new ones are still being created... The traditional story of Lao-Tzu is that he was a 6th-century B.C.E. philosopher and teacher in China. Indeed, his very name...read more

  • Friedrich Engels

    This book contains the fundamental works of Marxism, Anarchism and Bolshevism: The Communist Manifesto, originally the Manifesto of the Communist Party, by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels; The Conquest of Bread by the Russian anarcho-communist Peter Kropotkin; The State and Revolution by Vladimir...read more

  • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

    Necronomicon: The Best Weird Tales of H.P. Lovecraft: Commemorative Edition is a select collection of horror short stories, novellas and novels written by H. P. Lovecraft. This collection includes stories by H. P. Lovecraft: The Call of Cthulhu, Dagon, Herbert West-Reanimator, The Lurking Fear, The Rats in the Walls, The Whisperer in Darkness, Cool Air, In the Vault, The Colour out of Space, The Horror at Red Hook, The Music of Erich Zann, The Shadow out of Time, The Dunwich Horror, The Haunter of the Dark, The Outsider, The Shunned House, The Unnameable, The Thing on the...read more

  • Edwin A. Abbott

    Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions is a satirical novella by the English schoolmaster and clergyman Edwin Abbott Abbott. The story describes a two-dimensional world occupied by geometric figures, whereof women are simple line-segments, while men are polygons with various numbers of sides. Written pseudonymously by 'A Square', the book used the fictional two-dimensional world of Flatland to comment on the hierarchy of Victorian culture, but the novella's more enduring contribution is its examination of dimensions. This masterpiece of science (and mathematical) fiction is a delightfully unique and highly entertaining satire that has charmed readers for more than 100...read more