Searching for: "Malcolm Hillgartner"

  • Philip Roth

    Now in his mid-thirties, Nathan Zuckerman, a would-be recluse despite his newfound fame as a bestselling author, ventures onto the streets of Manhattan in the final year of the turbulent sixties. Not only is he assumed by his fans to be his own fictional satyr, Gilbert Carnovsky ("Hey, you do all that stuff in that book?"), he also finds himself the target of admonishers, advisors, and sidewalk literary critics. The recent murders of Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr. lead an unsettled Zuckerman to wonder if "target" may be more than a figure of speech. In Zuckerman Unbound, the second volume in a trilogy, the notorious novelist Nathan Zuckerman retreats from his oldest friends,...read more

  • Dean Koontz

    For one man, they are the five most terrifying words of all…your heart belongs to meOne year after the heart transplant that saved his life, thirty-five-year-old Ryan Perry has never felt better. He’s getting back everything he nearly lost forever—his business, his life, and, with luck, his beloved girlfriend. Miracles do happen.Then the unmarked gifts begin to arrive—a box of candy hearts, a heart-shaped pendant. Most disturbing of all is a graphic heart-surgery video and its chilling message: Your heart belongs to me. Ryan is being stalked by someone who feels entitled to everything he has. She’s the spitting image of the twenty-six-year-old donor of the...read more

  • Peter Stark

    A vivid and groundbreaking portrait of a young, struggling George Washington that casts a new light on his character and the history of American independence, from the bestselling author of Astoria Two decades before he led America to independence, George Washington was a flailing young soldier serving the British Empire in the vast wilderness of the Ohio Valley. Naive and self-absorbed, the twenty-two-year-old officer accidentally ignited the French and Indian War—a conflict that opened colonists to the possibility of an American Revolution. With powerful narrative drive and vivid writing, Young Washington recounts the wilderness trials, controversial battles, and emotional...read more

  • Stanley Weintraub

    In Young Mr. Roosevelt Stanley Weintraub evokes Franklin Delano Roosevelt's political and wartime beginnings. An unpromising patrician playboy appointed assistant secretary of the Navy in 1913, Roosevelt learned quickly and rose to national visibility during World War I. Democratic vice-presidential nominee in 1920, he lost the election but not his ambitions. While his stature was rising, his testy marriage to his cousin Eleanor was fraying amid scandal quietly covered up. Even polio a year later would not suppress the ever indomitable Roosevelt and his inevitable ascent. Against the backdrop of a reluctant America's entry into a world war and FDR's hawkish build-up of a modern navy,...read more

  • Benson Bobrick

    Next to the Bible itself, the English Bible was-and is-the most influential book ever published. The most famous of all English Bibles, the King James Version, was the culmination of centuries of work by various translators, from John Wycliffe, the fourteenth-century catalyst of English Bible translation, to the committee of scholars who collaborated on the King James translation. Wide as the Waters examines the life and work of Wycliffe and recounts the tribulations of his successors, including William Tyndale, who was martyred, Miles Coverdale, and others who came to bitter ends. It traces the story of the English Bible through the tumultuous reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary Tudor,...read more

  • Ramesh Srinivasan

    In the digital age, technology has shrunk the physical world into a 'global village,' where we all seem to be connected as an online community as information travels to the farthest reaches of the planet with the click of a mouse. Yet while we think of platforms such as Twitter and Facebook as open and accessible to all, in reality, these are commercial entities developed primarily by and for the Western world. Considering how new technologies increasingly shape labor, economics, and politics, these tools often reinforce the inequalities of globalization, rarely reflecting the perspectives of those at the bottom of the digital divide. This book asks us to reconsider 'whose...read more

  • Christopher Klein

    'Christopher Klein's fresh telling of this story is an important landmark in both Irish and American history.' —James M. McPherson Just over a year after Robert E. Lee relinquished his sword, a band of Union and Confederate veterans dusted off their guns. But these former foes had no intention of reigniting the Civil War. Instead, they fought side by side to undertake one of the most fantastical missions in military history: to seize the British province of Canada and to hold it hostage until the independence of Ireland was secured. By the time that these invasions--known collectively as the Fenian raids--began in 1866, Ireland had been Britain's unwilling colony for seven...read more

  • Ronald C. Rosbottom

    The spellbinding and revealing chronicle of Nazi-occupied Paris. On June 14, 1940, German tanks entered a silent and nearly deserted Paris. Eight days later, France accepted a humiliating defeat and foreign occupation. Subsequently, an eerie sense of normalcy settled over the City of Light. Many Parisians keenly adapted themselves to the situation-even allied themselves with their Nazi overlords. At the same time, amidst this darkening gloom of German ruthlessness, shortages, and curfews, a resistance arose. Parisians of all stripes -- Jews, immigrants, adolescents, communists, rightists, cultural icons such as Colette, de Beauvoir, Camus and Sartre, as well as police officers,...read more

  • Thomas Maier

    The firstcomprehensive history of the deeply entwined personal and public lives of theChurchills and the Kennedys and what their special relationship meant forGreat Britain and the United States When Lions Roar begins in the mid-1930s at Chartwell,Winston Churchill's country estate, with new revelations surrounding a secretbusiness deal orchestrated by Joseph P. Kennedy, the father of future Americanpresident John F. Kennedy. From London to America, these two powerful familiesshared an ever-widening circle of friends, lovers, and political associates-soonshattered by World War II, spying, sexual infidelity, and the tragic deaths ofJFK's sister Kathleen and his older brother Joe Jr. By the...read more

  • Robert Rotstein

    On the day before his twenty-first wedding anniversary, David Sullinger buried an ax in his wife’s skull. Now, eight jurors must retire to the deliberation room and decide whether David committed premeditated murder—or whether he was a battered spouse who killed his wife in self-defense. Told from the perspective of over a dozen participants in a murder trial, We, the Jury examines how public perception can mask the ghastliest nightmares. As the jurors stagger toward a verdict, they must sift through contradictory testimony from the Sullingers’ children, who disagree on which parent was Satan; sort out conflicting allegations of severe physical abuse, adultery, and incest; and...read more

  • Steve Beaven

    The inspiring true story of the tragic loss and triumphant resurrection of a basketball team and its coach at the heart of a small Indiana town. By 1977 the University of Evansville’s Purple Aces basketball team had won five small-college national championships. With a charismatic young coach and a freshman phenom, this small Indiana city hoped to see its team shine in the national spotlight. Then, on a foggy night, after just four games, the plane carrying the team and its coach crashed after takeoff, killing everyone on board. The tragedy seemed insurmountable, a devastating blow to the identity of a fading factory town. But, with the support of a city in mourning, ambitious...read more

  • General George Joulwan

    General George Joulwan played a role in many pivotal world events during his long and exceptional career. Present at both the rise and fall of the Berlin Wall, he served multiple tours in Germany during the Cold War and two tours in Vietnam. By chance, he was recruited as Nixon's White House deputy chief of staff and witnessed the last acts of the Watergate drama first-hand. Joulwan chronicles his career in the upper echelons of the armed forces. He shares his experiences working with major military and political figures, including generals William E. DePuy, Alexander Haig, John Vessey, and Colin Powell, US ambassador Richard Holbrooke, and presidents Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and Bill...read more

  • Maria Duenas

    New York Times bestselling author María Dueñas returns with The Vineyard, a magnificent story of ambition, heartbreak, and desire set in the 1860s Mexico, Cuba, and Spain-perfect for fans of Kate Morton and Kristin Hannah. Mauro Larrea's fortune, the result of years of hardship and toil, comes crashing down on the heels of a calamitous event. Swamped by debt and uncertainty, he gambles the last of his money in a daring play that wins him an abandoned house and a vineyard an ocean away. Mauro travels to Andalusia de Jerez in Spain with every intention of selling the property and returning to Mexico. That is, until he meets the unsettling Soledad Montalvo, the wife of a London wine...read more

  • Louis Begley

    Every year for the thirty they have been married, Louis Begley and Anka Muhlstein have escaped to Venice to write. In Venice for Lovers, Begley and Muhlstein fashion their own personal homages to Venice, one with a novella, the other with a personal essay. In her contribution to the book, Muhlstein charmingly describes how she and her husband dine at the same restaurant every night for years on end, and how becoming friends with restaurateurs has been an unsurpassed means of getting to know the city and its inhabitants, far from the tourists in San Marco Square. They meet Venetians like Ernesto, who tells them of the great flood that nearly destroyed the beautiful city; and Nerone, an...read more

  • John Thavis

    A revealing insidelook at one of the world's most powerful and mysterious institutions For more than twenty-five years John Thavis held one of themost fascinating journalistic jobs in the world: reporting on the innerworkings of the Vatican. His daily exposure to the power, politics, and personalitiesin the seat of Roman Catholicism gave him a unique, behind-the-scenesperspective on an institution that is far less monolithic and unified than itfirst appears. Thavis reveals Vatican City as a place where Curia cardinalsfight private wars, scandals threaten to undermine papal authority, andreverence for the past is continually upended by the practical considerationsof modern life. Thavis...read more

  • Edward Conard

    In the aftermath of the financial crisis, many commonly held beliefs have emerged to explain its cause. Conventional wisdom blames Wall Street and the mortgage industry for using low down payments, teaser rates, and other predatory tactics to seduce unsuspecting home owners into assuming mortgages they couldn't afford. It blames average Americans for borrowing recklessly and spending too much. And it blames the tax policies and deregulatory environment of the Reagan and Bush administrations for encouraging reckless risk taking by wealthy individuals and financial institutions. But according to Unintended Consequences, the conventional wisdom masks the real causes of our economic disruption...read more

  • Michael Bowen

    Rep and Melissa Pennyworth attend a reenactment of a Civil War battle in Kansas City, Missouri, while seeking a cutting-edge copyright case for attorney Rep-and find a corpse instead. Melissa's best friend from girlhood, Linda Damon, worked for the victim before his death and, on one regrettable occasion, got a bit too intimately involved in her job. Linda's husband, Peter, an enthusiastic Civil War hobbyist, had a motive, an opportunity, and a Civil War saber that now turns out to be drenched in the victim's blood. It would seem logical that this is a job for the police and that Rep's knowledge of trademark and copyright law, Melissa's PhD in literature, and the passionate Anglomania of...read more

  • Jeff Golden

    Two dates burn fiercely in the memory of millions of Americans: November 22, 1963, and September 11, 2001. These two tragedies bracket Unafraid, a story grounded in a simple question: What if the fatal bullet fired on that sunny Dallas afternoon had veered three inches off target? Unafraid lays out a compelling answer, rich with the public adventures and private dramas of twentieth-century icons-from J. Edgar Hoover to the Beatles-played out on a transformed world stage. At the center of this parallel history is a leader who blows the sides out of conventional politics with the simple belief that the primary reason idealistic goals are "impossible" to achieve is that we have needlessly...read more

  • Charles Leerhsen

    Finally-a fascinating and authoritative biography of perhaps the most controversial player in baseball history, Ty Cobb. Ty Cobb is baseball royalty, maybe even the greatest player who ever lived. His lifetime batting average is still the highest of all time, and when he retired in 1928, after twenty-one years with the Detroit Tigers and two with the Philadelphia Athletics, he held more than ninety records. But the numbers don't tell half of Cobb's tale. The Georgia Peach was by far the most thrilling player of the era: "Ty Cobb could cause more excitement with a base on balls than Babe Ruth could with a grand...read more

  • Dean Koontz

    They’re out there.Waiting. Watching. Unseen by normal eyes, but all too visible to Slim MacKenzie, a young man blessed—or cursed—by Twilight Eyes…They’re out thereLurking in the darkest shadows of an eerie, moonlit carnival. Feeding their twisted needs with human suffering. And fiendishly plotting the downfall of the human race…They’re out there But don’t scream. They’ll hear...read more