Searching for: "Mark F. Smith"

  • Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

    'Bring oxygen – Challenger.' The gang from `The Lost World‘ is back together, but the reunion is much more dramatic than they had hoped. As Professor Challenger has predicted, the Earth is moving into a belt of poisonous ether and their only chance of survival is joining him in his house and watch the whole shebang go down together. Though very different from the first in the series, `The Poison Belt` (1913) is equally interesting and can be enjoyed in its own right. Like in his Sherlock Holmes series Conan Doyle displays, in the Challenger books, a knack for writing memorable characters and situations; his description of people going crazy from the ether will have you in...read more

  • Jack London

    The story takes place in the extreme conditions of the Yukon during the 19th century Klondike Gold Rush, where strong sled dogs were in high demand. After Buck, a domesticated dog, is snatched from a pastoral ranch in California, he is sold into a brutal life as a sled dog. The novella details Buck's struggle to adjust and survive the cruel treatment he receives from humans, other dogs, and nature. He eventually sheds the veneer of civilization altogether and instead relies on primordial instincts and the lessons he has learned to become a respected and feared leader in the wild. The Call of the Wild is London's most popular work and is considered the masterpiece of his so called 'early...read more

  • Rudyard Kipling

    Captains Courageous is an 1897 novel, by Rudyard Kipling, that follows the adventures of fifteen year old Harvey Cheyne Jr., the arrogant and spoiled son of a railroad tycoon. The novel originally appeared as a serialization in McClure's, beginning with the November 1896...read more

  • Kenneth Grahame

    The Wind in the Willows is a classic of children's literature by Kenneth Grahame, first published in 1908. Alternately slow moving and fast paced, it focuses on four anthropomorphised animal characters in a pastoral version of England. The novel is notable for its mixture of mysticism, adventure, morality, and camaraderie and celebrated for its evocation of the nature of the Thames valley. The classic story of how Rat, Mole, and the other river bankers saved Toad from his excesses. This book has it all: excitement, sentiment, destruction of private property (plenty of that), paganism, and a happy ending. The prose is beautiful and occasionally requires the use of a dictionary. Written as a...read more

  • Jules Verne

    Phileas Fogg is English exactitude personified. He eats breakfast at 8:23, shaves at 9:37, and leaves for the Reform club at 11:30. He reads, eats, and doesn‘t travel. But one day, after getting into an argument over an article in the Daily Telegraph, he is prompted to make the £20.000 wager with his club friends that he can travel all the way around the world in eighty days. And so he leaves, accompanied only by his new French valet Passepartout: it is 8:45 P.M. on Wednesday the 2nd of October 1872 and he fully intends to be back by the 21st of December. Around the World in 80 days is one of French author Jules Verne most famous works. Published in 1873, it was adapted into the 2005...read more

  • Jack London

    When White Fang – part wolf, part dog – gets separated from his family, he must find a way to survive on his own. In a harsh Canadian environment that means kill or be killed. Tough surroundings and cruel masters make White Fang increasingly more aggressive and wild, but Weedon Scott, a kind gold hunter, sees the dog in him and attempts to tame him. Released in 1906, White Fang – companion novel to The Call of the Wild – was immediately successful, especially among younger readers. Ethan Hawke starred in the 1991 film adaptation as the wolfdog‘s friend, and in 2018, Netflix released a beautiful animated movie, introducing children to work of Jack...read more

  • Robert Louis Stevenson

    Recently orphaned 17-year-old David leaves his home on the Scottish countryside to seek out a rich uncle he has never met. The uncle, as it turns out, is paranoid and unpleasant, and before David can claim his inheritance he is knocked out and taken to sea to be sold as a slave in America. So begins Robert Louis Stevenson‘s adventure novel, Kidnapped (1886), a breathlessly exciting story for fans of action and suspense, and a story about two very different types of...read more

  • Edgar Rice Burroughs

    One day, an ape named Kala finds a small human boy in the jungles of Africa. She names him Tarzan ('White skin' in ape language), and raises him as her own. In time, differences between himself and his tribe become clear to Tarzan, and when he finds a human-made cabin with books and photographs, he starts to understand why. Little does he know that his encounters with other humans have only just begun. This 1912 novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs was first published in a pulp magazine and quickly became so popular that twenty-three sequels followed. The story of Tarzan has been adapted to film many times, the 1999 Disney movie with its Phil Collins soundtrack being a fan...read more

  • Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

    Arguably the best compilation of mystery stories ever, `The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes‘ (1892) is for any lover of intrigue and sophisticated humour. Sherlock‘s talent for solving cases based on things only he notices never disappoints, and everyone‘s curiosity is sure to be sustained till the end of each story. There is a reason Sherlock Holmes has been adapted more than a hundred times for various media. 2009-2011 saw Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law as Sherlock and Watson, and even Will Ferrell has taken a stab at the popular character. Fans of the popular BBC series `Sherlock‘ (2010-2017) by Doctor Who showrunner Steven Moffat, which starred Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin...read more

  • Jules Verne

    The Mysterious Island (French: L'Ile mystérieuse) is a novel by Jules Verne, published in 1874. The novel is a crossover sequel to Verne's famous Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea and In Search of the Castaways, though thematically it is vastly different from those books. An early draft of the novel, initially rejected by Verne's publisher and wholly reconceived before publication, was titled Shipwrecked Family: Marooned With Uncle Robinson, seen as indicating the influence on the novel of Robinson Crusoe and The Swiss Family...read more