Searching for: "Mark Penfold"

  • King James Version

    The final book of the Holy Scriptures describes a dramatic, often terrifying vision by John, who may or may not have been the same John who was an apostle to Jesus Christ. A prisoner on the island of Patmos, John sees the unveiling of Christ as He really is, through colorful and haunting symbols depicting the trials and tribulations of the saints of God, as well as the coming New Jerusalem. This book is believed to have been written this way as a kind of "secret code" for Christians suffering under the intense persecution of Rome. (Introduction by Mark...read more

  • Weymouth New Testament

    Richard Francis Weymouth was born on October 26, 1822 near Plymouth Dock, now known as Devonport, near Plymouth, Devonshire, in England. Dr. Weymouth was a Bible scholar and a philologist (a student of the origins of language), as well as a layman, in the English Baptist denomination. He edited "The Resultant Greek Text", after which he based his "New Testament in Modern Speech", which was published posthumously in 1903. He passed away on December 27, 1902 in Essex. His work is known for its simpler language and use in private reading. (Summary by Mark...read more

  • Charles Dudley Warner

    Warner's thoughtful and often humorous memoir of his life as a young farm-boy in Charlemont, Massachusetts. (Introduction by Mark...read more

  • American Bible Union

    This 1871 revision of The Psalms by the American Bible Union is based on the "Common Version," another name for the 1833 revision of the King James Version of The Bible by Noah Webster. (Summary by Mark...read more

  • King James Version

    The Book of Lamentations is a series of mournful poems written by the Prophet Jeremiah as he saw the destruction of Jerusalem. Jeremiah laments the desolation of this once great city, as well as the condition of the people, many of whom were once surrounded by great wealth and honor. Jeremiah has been referred to by many as "The Weeping Prophet", and this book merely confirms the sense of this title. (Summary by Mark...read more

  • Weymouth New Testament

    Richard Francis Weymouth was born on October 26, 1822 near Plymouth Dock, now known as Devonport, near Plymouth, Devonshire, in England. Dr. Weymouth was a Bible scholar and a philologist (a student of the origins of language), as well as a layman, in the English Baptist denomination. He edited "The Resultant Greek Text", after which he based his "New Testament in Modern Speech", which was published posthumously in 1903. He passed away on December 27, 1902 in Essex. His work is known for its simpler language and use in private reading. (Summary by Mark...read more

  • Weymouth New Testament

    Richard Francis Weymouth was born on October 26, 1822 near Plymouth Dock, now known as Devonport, near Plymouth, Devonshire, in England. Dr. Weymouth was a Bible scholar and a philologist (a student of the origins of language), as well as a layman, in the English Baptist denomination. He edited "The Resultant Greek Text", after which he based his "New Testament in Modern Speech", which was published posthumously in 1903. He passed away on December 27, 1902 in Essex. His work is known for its simpler language and use in private reading. (Summary by Mark...read more

  • Weymouth New Testament

    Richard Francis Weymouth was born 1822 a short distance from Plymouth Dock, now called Devonport, near Plymouth, Devonshire, England. Weymouth, a scholar and layman of the English Baptist denomination, edited The Resultant Greek Text, after which he based The New Testament in Modern Speech. His New Testament was published posthumously in 1903. Dr. Weymouth passed away December 27, 1902. (Summary by Mark...read more

  • Weymouth New Testament

    Richard Francis Weymouth was born on October 26, 1822 near Plymouth Dock, now known as Devonport, near Plymouth, Devonshire, in England. Dr. Weymouth was a Bible scholar and a philologist (a student of the origins of language), as well as a layman, in the English Baptist denomination. He edited "The Resultant Greek Text", after which he based his "New Testament in Modern Speech", which was published posthumously in 1903. He passed away on December 27, 1902 in Essex. His work is known for its simpler language and use in private reading. (Summary by Mark...read more

  • Young's Literal Translation

    This book tells of the leadership of Joshua, aide to the late prophet/leader Moses, and the division of territories amongst the 12 tribes of Israel. The toppling of the Wall of Jericho is one of the most popular stories in this book. (Introduction by Mark Penfold) Young's Literal Translation is a translation of the Bible into English, published in 1862. The translation was made by Robert Young, compiler of Young's Analytical Concordance to the Bible and Concise Critical Comments on the New Testament. Young produced a "Revised Edition" of the translation in 1887. After he died on October 14, 1888, the publisher in 1898 released a new Revised Edition. (Summary from...read more

  • Young's Literal Translation

    The Book of The Judges is a record of the Israelites' pattern of continuing disobedience to God, and their salvation by God through judges chosen to lead the people. (Introduction by Mark...read more

  • Young's Literal Translation

    This book describes the return of Israelites from exile in Babylon. One group returns to rebuild the Temple and restore the worship of The LORD, while the second group, led by the priest and scribe Ezra, returns to re-establish Mosaic law to the Israelite community. The Books of Ezra and Nehemiah were once considered one book. (Introduction by Mark...read more

  • Young's Literal Translation

    This book contains small morsels of great practical wisdom and instruction for all. Solomon, no doubt, wrote the majority of this book, but the last proverb was authored by a King Lemuel, who wrote of the wisdom imparted to him by his mother. (Introduction by Mark...read more

  • Charles Dudley Warner

    This is Warner's contemplative and humorous account of the wondrous and mysterious workings of a garden he tended for 19 weeks. After this is a essay of remembrance for Warner's beloved cat, Calvin. (Summary by Mark...read more

  • Ferrar Fenton Bible

    The record of the numbering of the nation of Israel, as well as the beginning of their "maturity" as they near the "promised land" of Canaan. (Introduction by Mark...read more

  • Young's Literal Translation

    Rather than repeating the vast geneaology of King David found in the First Book of The Chronicles, the Second Book of The Chronicles recounts the rulership of the kings descended from him, namely, from his son Solomon to the evil king Zedekiah (called Zakeriah in Fenton's version, Zedekiah in NIV). (Introduction by Mark...read more

  • Young's Literal Translation

    Not just a big book of geneaological lists, it is a record of things not mentioned in the Books of Samuel and Kings. It tells us of the kingdom of David and his life, but also gives us incredible spiritual truths. (Introduction by Mark...read more

  • Weymouth New Testament

    This is the Apostle Paul's first letter to the church in Corinth, Greece, a seaport filled with a diversity of not only people but religions. This letter gives advice, teaching, and stern warnings to his fellow Christians, especially warnings against sexual immorality. Paul also discusses division within the assembly and addresses some difficult issues surrounding such things as marriage. (Introduction by Mark...read more

  • Young's Literal Translation

    Nehemiah is the story of a man determined to restore the Temple, as well as the strength and integrity of the Nation of Israel. A lowly butler to a mighty king, Nehemiah rises to a postition of prominence among his people as he reminds them of their obligation to the Law of Moses. Nehemiah is a man of prayer and deep reverence to his God who is constantly on the look-out for his people, as well as for those who disobey the Law and the Sabbath day. (Introduction by Mark...read more

  • Weymouth New Testament

    This second letter from the Apostle Paul to the congregation of believers in the bustling port city of Corinth gives us a much more personal understanding of Paul's apostleship. He defends it rigorously, convincing his followers of his authority from God and his rights under that authority. His appeals to patience and understanding display a great emotional vulnerability in the seasoned preacher and missionary. He discusses the need to support the congregation in Jerusalem with their gifts, and reaffirms and vindicates his position as apostle to the Gentiles. - Summary by Mark...read more