Searching for: "Milton Bagby"

  • Milton Bagby

    He wakes up from an alcoholic blackout to discover he's being arrested for killing a man in a hit and run accident. He has no memory of the previous night-how he got so drunk, who was with him, how he got home from the bar. All a blank. His car-parked askew in the front yard-has a badly damaged front fender ominously covered with a drying smear of blood. He remembers going to the bar the night before-but that's it. Then, at his trial, the prosecution drops a bomb. A last minute witness is discovered, a cheap hooker who says Sam picked her up and took her to his place for a date. He was crazy drunk, driving all over the road, she testifies, when he veered across the road and struck a man,...read more

  • Author Various

    The Lone Ranger magazine ran from April 1937 to November 1937. The title was changed to Romantic Western and was published from January 1938 to July 1939. Trojan Publishing was the publisher. The pulp magazine preceded the first recorded radio show. These six stories are torn from the pages of the April, 1937 issue of The Lone Ranger magazine and is read with stirring intensity by Milton Bagby, Paul Curtis, and Joe...read more

  • Curtis Steele

    America, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mississippi River, has been washed in blood by the ruthless war hordes of the invader, Rudolph I. On the banks of the mighty Father of Waters the American people, poorly armed, ragged and desperate, are making a last stand. But as rumors reach them of the bloody slaughter to the east, as the heavens fill swiftly with thousands of enemy planes, and they sense the insidious treachery developing among their own military leaders, their grim courage begins to weaken. Their only hope lies in Operator 5 - and he, a victim of internal treachery, has disappeared! The Purple Invasion was an epic tale that recast not only Jimmy Christopher, but the world itself....read more

  • Curtis Steele

    Purple armies from the prairies and a great Purple navy looming over the western horizon made ready to clamp the fetters of slavery on America's last defenders. But a grim line of fighting men waited in the Emperor Rudolph's path with a soldierly serenity that said, "Here we die." And every life laid on this altar of freedom gave Jimmy Christopher, Operator #5 of the Intelligence Service, new respite as he followed a trail of desperate adventure studded with disgrace and death. After two years, Frederick C. Davis, the original author behind Operator #5, grew tired of saving the United States through his surrogate hero, and bowed out. His editors required that he write under the house name...read more

  • Curtis Steele

    Sweeping westward down the Pacific slope, the Purple Emperor's invading armies thundered to trap the last defending Americans between flaming guns and an ocean grave. Operator #5, with the audacity of desperation, launched a forlorn hope - a dazzling daring raid into the heart of the enemy's lines. Here is the tale of the mad dash of his pitifully heroic handful of volunteers toward the great gun works where he might snatch victory from defeat. Working for Agent Z-7, head of an unnamed branch of U. S. Intelligence in the decade before the C. I. A. was ever envisioned, Operator #5 was assisted by newspaper reporter Diane Elliott, a two-fisted street kid named Tim Donovan, as well as his twin...read more

  • Edmond Hamilton

    From the pages of classic Pulp, Captain Future flies into action, displaying the most exciting aspects of Science Fiction. Although modeled to a degree after Doc Savage, Captain Future is also the ultimate space opera hero. Coming complete with not only a tragic, yet inspiring origin story driving him into defending interstellar justice, everyone and everything Curt Newton encounters is colorful, vibrant, and over the top, definite trademarks of the best space opera. Although an orphan, Curtis Newton's parents left him with gifts that would most definitely lead to him becoming Captain Future, the superman of the spaceways. His mother, Elaine, provided him with his mission, to become the...read more

  • Brett Sterling

    Edmond Hamilton is credited by many as the creator and writer of Captain Future. Although he is most responsible for nearly everything in the Captain Future tales, the idea was originally presented to him by Science Fiction editor Mort Weisinger. Also, Hamilton did pen the majority of the stories, but Joseph Samachson also wrote two Captain Future stories and Manly Wade Wellman wrote one. Five of the Captain Future tales carry the byline 'Brett Sterling', which was a housename used for a while that both Hamilton and Samachson wrote under. The Captain Future stories were not only populated with magnificent characters, but they were also set in a wild, imaginative, almost psychedelic...read more

  • Manly Wade Wellman

    Edmond Hamilton is credited by many as the creator and writer of Captain Future. Although he is most responsible for nearly everything in the Captain Future tales, the idea was originally presented to him by Science Fiction editor Mort Weisinger. Also, Hamilton did pen the majority of the stories, but Joseph Samachson also wrote two Captain Future stories and Manly Wade Wellman wrote one. Five of the Captain Future tales carry the byline 'Brett Sterling', which was a house name used for a while that both Hamilton and Samachson wrote under. Protecting the universe is not a job that Captain Future and the Futuremen can do alone. The Planet Police, a far reaching organization of law...read more

  • G. T. Fleming-Roberts

    Written by G.T. Fleming-Roberts, the Hooded Detective, a costumed crime fighter who was more than happy to commit crimes to help solve crimes. The Black Hood appeared in the September 1941 issue of Black Hood Detective magazine. The title was changed to Hooded Detective magazine for the November 1941 and January 1942 issues. The Black Hood also had a comic book and a radio show. Columbia Publications was the publisher and Cliff Campbell was the editor. These nine stories are torn from the pages of the January, 1942 issue of Hooded Detective magazine and is read with stirring intensity by award winning voice actor, Milton...read more

  • G. T. Fleming-Roberts

    The pulp magazine had three names during its seven issue run. The Ghost, Super-Detective as the pulp magazine was originally titled for the first three issues from January, 1940 to the Summer issue of 1940. The name of the magazine was changed to The Ghost Detective for the Fall 1940 issue and starting with the Winter 1941 issue and lasting for three issues, the name was changed to The Green Ghost Detective, before succumbing to the World War II paper shortage. Better Publications was the publisher and Leo Margulies was the editor. The character stories about the Ghost Detective continued in Thrilling Mystery magazine. These three stories are torn from the pages of the Winter, 1941 issue of...read more

  • Curtis Steele

    The United States forces have been driven to their last, desperate stronghold before the blood-maddened ruthless hordes of the self-styled emperor, Rudolph I, even as a courageous but blind nation, wrapped in the dreams of false security, had practiced the foolish doctrine of "It can't happen here!" America's patriotic Death Battalion was the last ragged hope of embattled patriots - the women of the nation who hurled themselves bravely and futilely against the war-mad forces of the Purple Invaders. When they fell before the terror-inspiring and deadly barrage of cholera bombs, a few stricken survivors turned for their hope of averting ultimate disaster to one man - Jimmy Christopher - who,...read more

  • Curtis Steele

    The Purple invader lorded it over the East, straddled the Rockies, rolled his guns ruthlessly westward to crush the last American defenders. But men who are willing to die for their country can never be completely licked! And Operator #5, leading a gallant handful, began a miracle march to seize a deadly treasure, rally an army, and fling the enemy a new, grim challenge on an unsuspected front! Jimmy Christopher belonged to the clean-cut, square-jaw, clear-eyed breed of hero made popular by the F. B. I. back in those grim days. Even with that wholesome, image, Jimmy came well armed and prepared. He carried a Colt automatic and wore a flexible rapier concealed in the hollow of his leather...read more

  • Curtis Steele

    The guillotine rose and fell, and American patriots died for daring to defy the Purple invader, supreme from the Atlantic to the Pacific. In sun-bleached Death Valley, Operator #5's outlawed, ragged army chafed within the cordon of the great Purple army. Only a military miracle would arouse despairing Americans and free those lost legions... To make possible that miracle, Operator #5 gambles boldly with Death at the very heart of Emperor Rudolph's colossus of strangling steel. In 1934, with Hitler consolidating power in Germany and the Japanese Empire on the rise in Asia, young pulp publisher Harry Steeger decided that the American public was ready for a magazine chronicling the exploits of...read more

  • Curtis Steele

    They thundered through the high passes of the Continental Divide, those rolling drums of doom, heralding the attack of the Purple Emperor's mighty armies which had conquered all of Eastern America to the Rockies. Rallying to hold the Divide, Operator #5, alone with a handful of weary, starving defenders, pits himself against Rudolph's unconquered destroying hordes, his only weapon the strategy of bold and desperate men with their backs to an alien seat. Originally written by master pulpsmith Frederick C. Davis, Operator #5 was a clear forerunner of the spy genre, which exploded in the 1960s when President John F. Kennedy happened to remark that he enjoyed reading Ian Fleming's James Bond...read more

  • Curtis Steele

    America's Defenders wavered at the Divide before those trenches of the Purple Empire hordes - checked by a living wall of crucified children! How could they gain victory without massacring their own? And how could Operator #5 avert this total annihilation of the nation's young? From behind that human barricade, the mad Emperor's legion poured out death, secure in its ghastly strategy. There was but one way of overthrowing the invaders, terrible though its cost. Into the jaws of destruction marched the men who knew how to die - then miraculously attack again! "The basic concept of Operator #5 came from Harry Steeger, the publisher, or Rogers Terrill, the editor, or both," original Operator...read more

  • Curtis Steele

    Helpless America had been hurled back into the abysmal dawn of history, by those guerilla bands of the Purple Emperor, which had been loosed in fury and hate to put civilization to fire and sword. Across the Hudson, slaying as they came, advanced the Gothic hordes which would sack the nation's great metropolis. And only Operator #5, racing against time and fate, could hope to challenge this new, grim menace which threatened the entire world with primitive darkness! For nearly two years, writer Frederick C Davis was content to grind out monthly Operator #5 novels under the house pseudonym of Curtis Steele. A long-time pulp veteran, Davis was much in demand, and discovered that writing...read more

  • Curtis Steele

    Sweeping through ravaged Pennsylvania, came the blood-maddened Mongol legions - already planning a swift and merciless descent upon helpless New York City! Before them, a starring, ragged band of desperate patriots - led by Operator #5 - was America's only hope of saving its metropolis. A thousand Yankee fighters who would turn them back - or die! After a false turn in which Operator #5 flirted briefly with being a kind of super G-man in the April, 1936 novel, Crime's Reign of Terror, the magazine was downgraded to bimonthly status and what has become known as the "War in Peace of the Pulps" commenced with the searing novel, Death's Ragged Army, which appeared in the July, 1936 issue of...read more

  • Curtis Steele

    Pitted against the Mongol land forces, and the Purple Fleet, bombarding from the sea - New York's embattled army had stood off the long, bitter siege. At last, victory was within the grasp of Operator #5 and his little band of American fighters. Then came the Emperor's final trump card - a foul, slaying miasma which loosed itself over the land, bringing a torturing, horrible death - which all men knew and feared as Europe's medieval Black Plague! Never before had an action hero failed to resolve the main threat by the end of his own magazine's lead novel. But with The Purple Invasion in the Operator #5 magazine, Jimmy Christopher was forced to fight on and on, with no clear victory in...read more

  • Mark Jenest

    Streetwise sleight of hand expert Drake Everett is hired to be a crooked dealer in a high stakes Hollywood poker game. Drake secretly takes control of the entertainment industry by manipulating career deals at the poker...read more

  • Michael W. Sherer

    How do you live without someone who's been part of your life for twenty years? Jack Holm begins to find out when his wife doesn't return to their suburban Seattle home after shopping one day. Her absence is not unusual given her flight attendant's job, and it's a respite from recent marital discord, so Jack feels relief not worry. But when a day goes by with no word, then another, Jack, his teenage daughter and ten-year-old son do worry. After three days, Jack reports her missing. Suddenly, Jack is swept up in a terrifying conflagration of events that threaten to tear his world apart. The police suspect him of foul play. Children and Family Services suspects him of abuse. And someone is...read more