Searching for: "Nelson Runger"

  • John McPhee

    To geologists, rocks are beautiful, roadcuts are windowpanes, and the earth is alive-a work in progress. The cataclysmic movement that gives birth to mountains and oceans is ongoing and can still be seen at certain places on our planet. One of these is the Basin and Range region centered in Nevada and Utah. In this first book of a Pulitzer Prize-winning collection, the author crosses the spectacular Basin and Range with geology professor Kenneth Deffeyes in tow. McPhee draws on Deffeyes' expertise to dazzle you with the vast perspective of geologic time and the fascinating history of vanished landscapes. The effect is guaranteed to expand your mind. McPhee's enthusiasm is infectious, as he...read more

  • Axel Madsen

    Author of fourteen biographies, Axel Madsen chronicles the people who shaped the 20th century. In The Deal Maker, he sheds light on a man whose tireless optimism led to the formation of the first super-corporation. A charismatic salesman in the late 19th century, William Durant started a cart-building business after accepting an especially comfortable ride one day. By the time he turned forty, he was a millionaire wondering what to do with the rest of his life. When he was approached by retired plumber David Buick and a group of friends from his hometown of Flint, Michigan, Durant had only ridden in an automobile twice. His ensuing creation of General Motors essentially invented modern-day...read more

  • Donald T. Phillips

    If you aspire to lead-whether in business or your community-this book is just what you need. Leadership authority Donald T. Phillips offers a uniquely inspiring approach. He presents real-life scenarios from the American Revolution to illustrate how to overcome the toughest odds and achieve success. As you learn the strategies that worked for our founding fathers, you will share in the very principles that founded America. When the colonists' situation under British tyranny became desperate, dynamic leaders arose from the masses. Washington, Paine, Franklin, and other men of integrity banded together to manifest a shared vision. They forged a team of patriots who withstood impossible...read more

  • Donald T. Phillips

    In this remarkable book-hailed by CEOs, politicians, coaches, and college presidents alike-Donald T. Phillips examines Lincoln's effective leadership style. As he explores the President's diverse management skills, he demonstrates how you can succeed with them in today's complex world. When Lincoln took the oath of office in 1861, the Confederate States had already seceded from the Union. Even though his own advisers expected him to fail, he eventually reunited the embattled states with uncommon good sense. Using historical anecdotes, speeches, and Lincoln's own letters, the author shares the President's practical managerial strategies: seize the initiative, wage only one war at a time,...read more

  • Andro Linklater

    Using the same blend of narrative and rhetorical brilliance that made his critically acclaimed debut history so successful, Andro Linklater begins with premier U.S. surveyor Andrew Ellicott calculating the Pennsylvania-Virginia border in 1784- using telescope, chronograph, and astronomical tables. As pioneers move westward, Ellicott and his kind create property which hastens the formation of stabilizing...read more

  • Richard E. Rubenstein

    Europe was in the long slumber of the Middle Ages, the Roman Empire was in tatters, and the Greek language was all but forgotten, until a group of twelfth-century scholars rediscovered and translated the works of Aristotle. His ideas spread like wildfire across Europe, offering the scientific view that the natural world, including the soul of man, was a proper subject of study. The rediscovery of these ancient ideas sparked riots and heresy trials, caused major upheavals in the Catholic Church, and also set the stage for today's rift between reason and religion. In Aristotle's Children, Richard Rubenstein transports us back in history, rendering the controversies of the Middle Ages lively...read more

  • William Sherman

    He's been called the first modern general-the first military leader to understand that in the future, wars would be won not by fighting, but by the movement of troops. His memoirs rank with Grant's as the greatest of the Civil War. In vigorous, frank, and powerful prose, Sherman reveals his strategic planning for battles such as Bull Run, Shiloh, and Vicksburg and delivers classic lessons-and military philosophies-about this...read more

  • Elliott Roosevelt

    With the children away, and the death of Franklin's mother, it looked as if it would be a gloomy Christmas. Then the maid discovered something quite remarkable in the walk-in refrigerator: a...read more

  • Michelle Houle

    Discusses the 1911 fire that killed 146 New York garment factory workers, the conditions that led up to it, and some of the legislation that came about to prevent the occurrence of similar...read more

  • Stephen W. Sears

    Throughout the devastating years of the Civil War, the Union Army of the Potomac seldom marched in step. In this provocative book, acclaimed historian and award-winning author Stephen W. Sears takes a fascinating look at some of the intriguing Union generals and the controversies that swirled around them. Delving into historical documents and the personal papers of military officers, Sears shares the compelling stories of oft-maligned Generals McClellan and Hooker, the shocking court-martial of patriotic General Stone, the failed plots to kidnap Confederate President Jefferson Davis, and more. As the facts come to light, the Union's renowned leaders stand revealed as what they really were:...read more

  • Jim Bishop

    In a historical classic as enthralling as a novel, author Jim Bishop colorfully depicts the city of Washington as it is celebrating the end of the Civil War. With research carefully gathered over 25 years, he weaves details together so skillfully, that even though you know the outcome, the suspense heightens with each unfolding event. It's Good Friday, April 14, 1865. While all around him, people demand vengeance on the subdued southern states, the President plans to rebuild demolished cities and send captured Secessionist soldiers home to plant their crops. At the famous Ford's Theatre across town, popular actor John Wilkes Booth furtively makes final preparations to destroy the man he...read more

  • Robert Root-Bernstein

    Written with wit and narrative force, Honey, Mud, Maggots and Other Medical Marvels is an enriching excursion into the world of folk medicine. The award-winning team of Robert and MichelE Root-Bernstein provide a fascinating glimpse into the evolution of medical traditions. In addition to the honey, mud, and maggots used in wound therapy, the Root-Bernsteins unearth cures that range from ancient Egypt to the rain forests of contemporary Latin America. Whether it's the medicinal use of clay or the components of urine, all the cures in this book have one thing in common: they have stood the test of time because they work. With Nelson Runger's dynamic and sensitive narration, this studied...read more

  • H.W. Brands

    Historian H.W. Brands' acclaimed, comprehensive biography of Ben Franklin--the first in over 60 years--made the New York Times best-seller list, was a main selection of the Book-of-the-Month Club, and earned a Pulitzer Prize nomination. The New Yorker hails, 'Like its subject, this biography is both solid and enchanting.' Many consider Franklin the most fascinating American man who ever lived. A scientist, businessman, diplomat, author, inventor, philosopher and politician, he is America's original Renaissance man. His remarkable and varied accomplishments include the discovery of electricity and the modernization of the postal system. Brilliant and bawdy, a master statesman and a cultural...read more

  • Jean Strouse

    Noted biographer Jean Strouse has won the Bancroft Prize and received fellowships from the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and the National Endowments for the Humanities and Arts. Her work has appeared in major magazines including The New Yorker and Newsweek. In Morgan, she creates the first complete portrait of a man who defined American commerce and banking. Contemporaries described J. Pierpoint Morgan as 'the financial Moses of the New World.' He was also called 'a beefy, red-faced, thick-necked financial bully, drunk with wealth and power .' To separate the legend from the man, Jean Strouse uses a wealth of uncataloged biographical documents from the Pierpoint Morgan Library. She shows...read more

  • John McPhee

    Fabulously entertaining and filled with the intriguing trivia of life, Irons in the Fire is another impeccably crafted collection of seven essays by John McPhee. His peerless writing-punctuated with a sharp sense of humor and fascinating detail-has earned him legions of fans across the country. Whether he's riding with a cattle brand inspector in wild and wide-open eastern Nevada, or following Plymouth Rock through its various sizes, shapes and resting places, McPhee provides the listener with an intimate glimpse into ordinary people and the extraordinary interests that shape their lives. These delightful pieces-including Irons in the Fire, Travels of the Rock, Release, In Virgin Forest,...read more

  • John McPhee

    For a person who has not encountered John McPhee's lively writing, The Second John McPhee Reader is the perfect introduction. McPhee, author of Coming Into the Country, and Assembling California punctuates his delightful prose with a sharp sense of humor and a fascination with things most of us never bother to notice. Whether he's working for a farmer in the Greenmarkets in Harlem, Brooklyn or the Upper East Side in Giving Good Weight, or trekking through Switzerland in La Place de la Concorde Suisse, McPhee gives the listener an intimate and provocative glimpse of the physical landscape and the people who are shaped by it. This Reader showcases a writer who not only is in absolute command...read more

  • John McPhee

    For a person who has not encountered John McPhee's lively writing, The Second John McPhee Reader is the perfect introduction. McPhee, author of Coming Into the Country, punctuates his delightful prose with a sharp sense of humor, and a fascination with things most of us never bother to notice. Whether he's profiling a northern Maine game warden named John McPhee in Table of Contents, or tracking down a fortune in 'unofficial' art from the Soviet Union's Khrushchev-Brezhnev era in The Ransom of Russian Art, McPhee gives the listener an intimate and provocative glimpse at the physical landscape and into the people who are shaped by it. This Reader showcases a writer who not only is in...read more

  • Donald T. Phillips

    The best-selling author of The Founding Fathers on Leadership takes an inspiring look at what it takes to lead in challenging times. Using lessons culled from Dr. King's written words and speeches, Phillips gives practical advice for leading in life, family matters, and business. Martin Luther King, Jr. provided inspired leadership during one of the most difficult times in American history. His success as a leader can be broken down into a few basic principles: preparing to lead by listening to others; guiding a movement by encouraging creative, flexible viewpoints; inspiring action by working with people; and ensuring future success by emphasizing a hopeful, compassionate dream. An...read more

  • John McPhee

    John McPhee's Pulitzer Prize-winning Annals of the Former World takes readers on mind-expanding adventures in geology. In the first book, Basin and Range, McPhee traveled to Nevada with a proponent of plate techtonics. Now, an engaging sceptic working for the United States Geological Survey is his guide to some of eastern America's most fascinating geologic formations. Respected geologist Anita Harris doesn't completely accept the reigning gospel of plate tectonics. Rather than limiting herself to one theory, the Brooklyn native insists on letting the rocks tell their own stories. Pickaxe and hydrochloric acid in hand, Harris guides McPhee to terrain that speaks of sudden, cataclysmic...read more

  • John McPhee

    With his Pulitzer Prize-winning Annals of the Former World, John McPhee explores not only the richly varied surface of the United States, but the geological wonders hidden deep beneath our feet. In this final book of the series, he embarks on a fascinating journey across the basement of the continent-the land masses forming Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, and thereabouts-with a professor and geochronologist acting as a guide. Whether Randy Van Schmus is out in the field with his students, or grinding rock in the university lab, he insists the flat plains of middle America are anything but dull. He tells the story of eons of violent upheaval that is written in the features lying far below the...read more