Searching for: "Norman Dietz"

  • Mark Twain

    In 1894, while enduring a period of personal turbulence, Mark Twain penned this fascinating tale set in the idyllic river community of his childhood. Alternating between comedy and tragedy, irony and gravity, Pudd'nhead Wilson mirrors much of the social and moral unrest of the time. When a mulatto slave woman switches her own infant with the look-alike son of a wealthy merchant, it takes Pudd'nhead Wilson, the town eccentric, to put things right...read more

  • John Alexander

    In this rare, exciting eyewitness account, a Confederate soldier reveals what life was really like on the battlefields of the Civil War. Lieutenant John Alexander tells how he joined Colonel Mosby and his infamous rough riders, how they managed their ventures behind enemy lines, and how they evaded capture by the Union...read more

  • Mark Twain

    Fashioned from the same experiences that would inspire the masterpiece Huckleberry Finn, Life on the Mississippi is Mark Twain's most brilliant and most personal nonfiction work. It is at once an affectionate evocation of the vital river life in the steamboat era and a melancholy reminiscence of its passing after the Civil War, a priceless collection of humorous anecdotes and folktales, and a unique glimpse into Twain's life before he began to write. Written in a prose style that has been hailed as among the greatest in English literature, Life on the Mississippi established Twain as not only the most popular humorist of his time but also America's most profound chronicler of the human...read more

  • Mark Twain

    The title story of this collection of short stories features the tale of the 'most honest and upright' town of Hadleyburg, whose residents boast of their unsmirched moral character. A stranger, offended by the pious reputation of the town, devises a plan to bring its honored residents to shame. Is there even one righteous man in...read more

  • Michael Malone

    Critically acclaimed author Michael Malone has won the Edgar, O. Henry, Writer's Guild, and Emmy Awards. Booklist hails The Last Noel as a 'warm, engaging love story.' This moving tale of an improbable friendship was a Book Sense 76 Top 10 selection. Noni Tilden and John 'Kaye' King meet as young children on Christmas Eve of 1963. Noni is a white, privileged girl, while Kaye is a poor, black boy. Over four decades, they continue to meet during the holidays, and their friendship endures all obstacles in its...read more

  • Robert Flynn

    Author Robert Flynn has won numerous accolades for his writing, including a Spur Award, a Western Heritage Award and a Distinguished Achievement Award from the Texas Institute of Letters. In the House of the Lord follows one day in the life of a Protestant minister as he balances faith with selfdoubt while answering the demands of his church. '[Flynn] displays a remarkable ability to lay bare our religious hypocrisies and flawed thinking, while he maintains an intense sympathy for the human condition and wry humor for his hero's predicament.'-Publishers...read more

  • Patrick F. McManus

    Grab your fishing net and hold onto your funny-bone; you're in for a hilarious romp through the woods with best-selling funnyman Patrick McManus. How I Got This Way is a rib-tickling collection of stories about the outdoors guaranteed to leave you chuckling. Join McManus and his pals on a venture into the Idaho wilderness that includes taking a hike with-ahem-the President of the United...read more

  • James Loewen

    Professor emeritus at the University of Vermont, James W. Loewen won the National Book Award for his New York Times best-seller, Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong. Sundown Towns examines thousands of all-white American towns that were- and still are, in some instances-racially exclusive by...read more

  • Paul Theroux

    Quintessential travel articles and thoughtful essays by the observant, witty and skeptical travel writer and novelist. Part One: 1964-1978 includes: Winter in Africa; Leper Colony; V.S. Naipaul; Memories of Old Afghanistan; The Night Ferry to Paris; and A Circuit of...read more

  • Paul Theroux

    Part Two: 1979-1984 includes: The Orient Express; Rudyard Kipling; Railways of the Raj; Graham Greene's Traveling Companion; and Sunrise with...read more

  • Mark Twain

    Two American originals, Mark Twain and the West, come together in this documentary of the author's seven-year 'pleasure trip' to the silver mines of Nevada. Twain had originally planned the trip to be a three-month 'vacation;' not surprisingly for someone of Twain's temperament, the trip lasted seven years. His journey, like his book, has a way of taking ever-unexpected...read more

  • Chuck Palahniuk

    Buster 'Rant' Casey just may be the most efficient serial killer of our time. A high school rebel, Rant Casey escapes from his small town home for the big city where he becomes the leader of an urban demolition derby called Party Crashing. Rant Casey will die a spectacular highway death, after which his friends gather the testimony needed to build an oral history of his short, violent life. With hilarity, horror, and blazing insight, Rant is a mind-bending vision of the future, as only Chuck Palahniuk could ever...read more

  • Patrick F. McManus

    Patrick McManus, author of How I Got This Way and one of America's favorite humorists, is an impish commentator on the obvious and not so obvious absurdities of modern life. His national best-seller, The Night the Bear Ate Goombaw, is a collection of hilarious short pieces about fishing, its exotic equipment, and activities like 'gunkholing.' You will learn, for example, that the best way to learn to fish is to build an addition to your house first. It should be big enough to hold all the nifty fishing equipment you will cart home from sporting goods stores and garage sales. McManus cheerfully guides you through the finer points of becoming a skilled garage sale shopper, too. Be prepared to...read more

  • James MacGregor Burns

    In this engaging history, James MacGregor Burns brings to vivid life the two-hundred-year conflagration of the Enlightenment, during which audacious questions and astonishing ideas tore across Europe and the New World, transforming thought, bringing down governments, and inspiring visionary political experiments that would ultimately reach every corner of the globe. Unlike most historians, Burns pays particular attention to America's intellectual revolution, beginning and ending his story on American soil. He discovers the origins of our domestic Enlightenment in men like Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson and their early encounters with incendiary European ideas about...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    In 'A Modest Proposal,' first published in 1729, Jonathan Swift heaps scorn on then-current political theory and reveals the appalling suffering taking place in Ireland - not through direct reporting, but through mock suggestions on what to do with the poor; they should sell their children for food. 'The chief end I propose to myself in all my labors is to vex the world rather than divert it,' wrote Jonathan Swift in a letter to his friend Alexander Pope. Other vexing works collected here are 'Directions to Servants,' 'The Art of Political Lying,' 'A Digression Concerning the Critics,' and 'Sweetness and...read more

  • Conrad Richter

    Published in 1936, this novel presents in epic scope the conflicts in the settling of the American Southwest. Set in New Mexico in the late 19th century, The Sea of Grass concerns the often violent clashes between the pioneering ranchers, whose cattle range freely through the vast sea of grass, and the farmers, or 'nesters,' who build fences and turn the sod. Against this background is set the triangle of rancher Colonel Jim Brewton, his unstable Eastern wife Lutie, and the ambitious Brice Chamberlain. Richter casts the story in Homeric terms, with the children caught up in the conflicts of their...read more

  • Paul Lockhart

    The image of the Baron de Steuben training Washington's ragged, demoralized troops in the snow at Valley Forge is part of the iconography of our Revolutionary heritage, but most history fans know little more about this fascinating figure. In the first book on Steuben since 1937, Paul Lockhart, an expert on European military history, finally explains the significance of Steuben's military experience in Europe. Steeped in the traditions of the Prussian army of Frederick the Great-the most ruthlessly effective in Europe-he taught the soldiers of the Continental Army how to fight like Europeans. His guiding hand shaped the army that triumphed over the British at Monmouth, Stony Point, and...read more

  • Howard Fast

    It was everywhere. You couldn't talk about the revolution without using the word freedom in the same breath. But Gideon Jackson knew that freedom meant something different if your skin was black. Fast's fictional account of the post Civil War era takes us into the life of Gideon Jackson, a black man, newly freed, and determined to make a...read more

  • Gerald J. Prokopowicz

    Our most revered president gets a unique and uniquely engaging biography fashioned from the answers to the most frequent-and most unusual and surprising-questions asked about Abraham Lincoln. What kind of law did Lincoln practice? Did he imprison his political enemies? What was it in his youth that put him on the path to greatness? These are some of the hundreds of questions that Gerald J. Prokopowicz was asked most often during the nine years he served as scholar-in-residence at the Lincoln Museum in Fort Wayne, Indiana. In this book, he organizes the questions along the timeline of Lincoln's life to give us a portrait of the sixteenth president unlike any we have had before. The...read more

  • Studs Terkel

    At nearly ninety-five, Studs Terkel has written about everyone's life, it seems, but his own. In Touch and Go, he offers a memoir that-embodying the spirit of the man himself-is youthful, vivacious, and enormous fun. Terkel begins by taking us back to his early childhood with his father, mother, and two older brothers, describing the hectic life of a family trying to earn a living in Chicago. He then goes on to recall his own experiences-as a poll watcher charged with stealing votes for the Democratic machine, as a young theatergoer, and eventually as an actor himself in both radio and on the stage-giving us a brilliant and often hilarious portrait of the Chicago of the 1920s and 1930s. He...read more