Searching for: "Norman Dietz"

  • Sam Keith

    To live in a pristine land unchanged by man...to roam a wilderness through which few other humans have passed...to choose an idyllic site, cut trees and build a log cabin...to be a self-sufficient craftsman, making what is needed from materials available...to be not at odds with the world but content with one's own thoughts and company. Thousands have had such dreams, but Richard Proenneke lived them. He found a place, built a cabin, and stayed to become part of the country. One Man's Wilderness is a simple account of the day-to-day explorations and activities he carried out alone, and the constant chain of nature's events that kept him company. From Proenneke's journals, and with...read more

  • Paul Theroux

    The Old Patagonian Express tells of Paul Theroux's train journey down the length of North and South America. Beginning on Boston's subway, he depicts a voyage from ice-bound Massachusetts to the arid plateau of Argentina's most southerly tip. Shivering and sweating by turns as the temperature and altitude rise and plummet, he describes the people he encountered – the tedious Mr Thornberry in LimOn and reading to the legendary blind writer, Jorge Luis Borges, in Buenos...read more

  • Patrick F. McManus

    Grab your fishing net and hold onto your funny-bone; you're in for a hilarious romp through the woods with best-selling funnyman Patrick McManus. How I Got This Way is a rib-tickling collection of stories about the outdoors guaranteed to leave you chuckling. Join McManus and his pals on a venture into the Idaho wilderness that includes taking a hike with-ahem-the President of the United...read more

  • Chuck Palahniuk

    Buster 'Rant' Casey just may be the most efficient serial killer of our time. A high school rebel, Rant Casey escapes from his small town home for the big city where he becomes the leader of an urban demolition derby called Party Crashing. Rant Casey will die a spectacular highway death, after which his friends gather the testimony needed to build an oral history of his short, violent life. With hilarity, horror, and blazing insight, Rant is a mind-bending vision of the future, as only Chuck Palahniuk could ever...read more

  • Chris Crowley

    Co-written by one of the country's most prominent internists, Dr. Henry 'Harry' Lodge, and his star patient, the 73-year-old Chris Crowley, Younger Next Year for Women is a book of hope, a guide to aging without fear or anxiety. This is a book of hope, a guide to aging without fear or anxiety. Using the same inspired structure of alternating voices, Chris and Harry have recast material specifically for women, who already live longer and take better care of themselves than men. New material covers menopause and post-menopause, as well as cardiac disease, osteoporosis, sexuality, and more. This is the book that can show us how to turn back our biological clocks-how to put off 70% of the...read more

  • Jules Verne

    Professor Von Hardwigg found the old Icelandic parchment in a bookstore, and his nephew Harry soon deciphered its secret Runic message: there was a path to the center of the earth, and an Icelandic explorer had found it 300 years earlier. The professor, Harry, and their guide Hans are soon plunged into an adventure that includes an underground ocean, prehistoric monsters, and a giant cave...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoevsky

    A predecessor to such monumental works as Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov, Notes from the Underground represents a turning point in Fyodor Dostoevsky's writing toward the more political side. In this work, we follow the unnamed narrator of the story, who, disillusioned by the oppression and corruption of the society in which he lives, withdraws from that society into the underground. This 'Underground Man' is one of the first genuine antiheroes in European literature. The first part of this unusual work is often treated as a philosophical text in its own right; the second part illustrates the theory of the first by means of its own fictional practice. A dark and politically...read more

  • Patrick F. McManus

    Humorist Patrick F. McManus has been called 'a master at spoofing sportsmen' by Publishers Weekly. His rib-tickling books about hunting, fishing, and camping receive rave reviews from national media. The New York Times Book Review writes, 'Everybody should read Patrick McManus.' In the chapters of Never Sniff a Gift Fish, McManus will teach you the wisdom that is usually shared only in the close ranks of modern-day hunters and gatherers. To complete your arsenal, McManus also includes The Hunter's Workout Guide and a special Family Camper's Dictionary. Exercises like the hindquarter shuffle will make you move like a hunter. And phrases like 'Yip-yip-yip-Owoooooo!' will help you sound like...read more

  • Patrick F. McManus

    You don't have to be a hunter or camper to enjoy this collection of hilarious stories by a writer who is often compared to Mark Twain and Garrison Keillor. In fact, the charm of Patrick F. McManus' work is that it provides plenty of reasons for staying indoors, surrounded by friendly appliances. You'll laugh aloud as McManus and his friends, including Rancid and Crazy Eddie, venture into the great outdoors to face formidable foes like truck campers, tackle boxes, and boat engines. Digging into his vast knapsack of anecdotes, McManus offers them as guides for the bumpier trails of life. Although his stories are wacky, McManus never resorts to profanity or crudity, even when he is considering...read more

  • Patrick F. McManus

    Patrick McManus, author of How I Got This Way and one of America's favorite humorists, is an impish commentator on the obvious and not so obvious absurdities of modern life. His national best-seller, The Night the Bear Ate Goombaw, is a collection of hilarious short pieces about fishing, its exotic equipment, and activities like 'gunkholing.' You will learn, for example, that the best way to learn to fish is to build an addition to your house first. It should be big enough to hold all the nifty fishing equipment you will cart home from sporting goods stores and garage sales. McManus cheerfully guides you through the finer points of becoming a skilled garage sale shopper, too. Be prepared to...read more

  • Robert Ruark

    This classic captures the endearing relationship between a man and his grandson as they fish and hunt the lakes and woods of North Carolina. All the while the Old Man acts as teacher and guide, passing on his wisdom and life experiences to the boy, who listens in rapt...read more

  • Patrick F. McManus

    Often compared to Garrison Keillor and Mark Twain, Patrick F. McManus maintains just the right balance between baffled innocence and conspiratorial confidence. Since 1979, this humorist has been delighting readers with hilarious stories recounting his childhood in rural Idaho and relating his misadventures in the great outdoors. Whether you're a sportsman or a couch potato, he will have you laughing out loud at his escapades. In this collection of 30 tall tales, McManus introduces you to the perils of Trailer Trials and Mean Tents. Like Hemingway, McManus hunts the big fish in Down and Way Out in Brazil. The title tale, The Grasshopper Trap, unveils an ingenious invention for catching fish...read more

  • James Loewen

    Professor emeritus at the University of Vermont, James W. Loewen won the National Book Award for his New York Times best-seller, Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong. Sundown Towns examines thousands of all-white American towns that were- and still are, in some instances-racially exclusive by...read more

  • Kim MacQuarrie

    In 1532, the fifty-four-year-old Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro led a force of 167 men, including his four brothers, to the shores of Peru. Unbeknownst to the Spaniards, the Inca rulers of Peru had just fought a bloody civil war in which the emperor Atahualpa had defeated his brother Huascar. Pizarro and his men soon clashed with Atahualpa and a huge force of Inca warriors at the Battle of Cajamarca. Despite being outnumbered by more than two hundred to one, the Spaniards prevailed-due largely to their horses, their steel armor and swords, and their tactic of surprise. They captured and imprisoned Atahualpa. Although the Inca emperor paid an enormous ransom in gold, the Spaniards...read more

  • American Bible Society

    A compilation of the Old and New Testament from the Unabridged Contemporary English Version Translation of the Holy Bible. This compilation also includes the Deuterocanonicals/Apocrypha in between the Old and New...read more

  • Patrick F. McManus

    With over two million copies of his works in print, Patrick McManus is an accomplished humor author. In The Bear in the Attic, he once again invites listeners to peek into his unique perspectives on life and his favorite topic, the great outdoors. Here listeners are treated to amazingly absurd tales of young male hijinks, camping mishaps and neighbor-eating bears! Norman Dietz adds another dimension to McManus' humor with his brilliant comic...read more

  • Eric Foner

    In this landmark work of deep scholarship and insight, Eric Foner gives us the definitive history of Abraham Lincoln and the end of slavery in America. Foner begins with Lincoln's youth in Indiana and Illinois and follows the trajectory of his career across an increasingly tense and shifting political terrain from Illinois to Washington, D.C. Although 'naturally anti-slavery' for as long as he can remember, Lincoln scrupulously holds to the position that the Constitution protects the institution in the original slave states. But the political landscape is transformed in 1854 when the Kansas-Nebraska Act makes the expansion of slavery a national issue. A man of considered words and...read more

  • Michael Hiltzik

    As breathtaking today as when it was completed, Hoover Dam ranks among America's greatest achievements. The story of its conception, design, and construction is the story of the United States at a unique moment in history: when facing both a global economic crisis and the implacable elements of nature, we prevailed. The United States after Hoover Dam was a different country from the one that began to build it, going from the glorification of individual effort to the value of shared enterprise and communal support. The dam became the physical embodiment of this change. A remote regional construction project transformed from a Republican afterthought into a New Deal symbol of national...read more

  • Chuck Tatum

    In 1944, the U.S. Marines were building the 5th Marine Division-also known as 'The Spearhead'-in preparation for the invasion of the small, Japanese-held island of Iwo Jima. When Charlie Tatum entered Camp Pendleton to begin Marine boot camp, he was just a smart-aleck teenager eager to serve his country. Little did he know that he would be training under the watchful eyes of a living legend of the Corps-Congressional Medal of Honor recipient John Basilone, who had almost single-handedly fought off a Japanese force of three-thousand on Guadalcanal, and survived. It was from Basilone and other 'Old Breed' sergeants that Tatum would learn how to fight like a Marine and act like a man, as he...read more

  • Jack London

    White Fang is the titular character and a novel by American author Jack London. First serialized in Outing magazine, it was published in 1906. The story takes place in Yukon Territory, Canada, during the Klondike Gold Rush at the end of the 19th-century, and details a wild wolfdog's journey to domestication. White Fang is a companion novel (and a thematic mirror) to London's best-known work, The Call of the Wild, which is about a kidnapped, domesticated dog embracing his wild ancestry to survive and thrive in the wild. Much of White Fang is written from the viewpoint of the titular canine character, enabling London to explore how animals view their world and how they view humans. White Fang...read more