Searching for: "Phil Paonessa"

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson

    This collection of nineteenth century essays explores Emerson's thoughts about transcendentalism, individualism, and romanticism. The centerpiece of the collection, Emerson's masterpiece Self-Reliance, explains the need for individuals to avoid conformity and false consistency so that they will be able to follow their own instincts and ideas. Although these thoughts may seem to be anti-society in nature, Emerson asserts that self-reliance must be the starting point not for the end of society but for a more efficient and better one. Throughout this collection, Emerson emphasizes that keen belief in the power of the...read more

  • Nigel Latta

    Sugar! What's not to like? It's being touted as highly addictive and the biggest contributor to the current worldwide obesity epidemic. We used to think high in fat diet was to blame so who's the real bad guy? This series takes on world-leading scientists and the food industry in an attempt to understand the truth about...read more

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson

    In 1834, Ralph Waldo Emerson, formerly a Unitarian minister, began a new career as a public lecturer. Many of those lectures formed the source material for his essays. Nature (1836), his first published work, contained the essence of his transcendental philosophy, which involved viewing the world of natural phenomena as a symbol of the inner life and emphasizing individual freedom and self-reliance. This collection contains eleven of his most celebrated and memorable essays from this period: Self-Reliance, Nature, Circles, Friendship, Heroism, Prudence," "Compensation," "Gifts," "Manners," "Shakespeare; Or, the Poet," and "The American...read more

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson

    In Gifts Ralph Waldo Emerson muses on the function of and expectations surrounding the giving of gifs. He touches on what gifts communicate about the nature of the giver and receiver, and how the best kind of gift is a gift of...read more

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson

    In Manners, Ralph Waldo Emerson expounds on the meaning of customs and politeness in civil society. He argues that the purpose of manners is more to facilitate the creation and proper working of society, and not to establish...read more

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson

    In The Poet, an essay by U.S. writer Ralph Waldo Emerson, the author expresses the need for the United States to have its own new and unique poet to write about the new country's virtues and vices. It is not about men of poetical talents, or of industry and skill in meter, but of the true poet. After reading the essay, Walt Whitman consciously set out to answer Emerson's call. When the 1855 edition of Leaves Of Grass was first published, Whitman sent a copy to Emerson, whose letter in response helped launch the book to success. In that letter Emerson called the collection the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom America has yet...read more

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson

    This version of Nature is an 1843 revision to the popular essay written and published in 1836. In the original essay, Emerson put forth the foundation of transcendentalism, and suggested that reality can be understood by studying nature. Within the essay, Emerson divides nature into four usages: Commodity, Beauty, Language and Discipline. These distinctions define how humans use nature for their basic needs, their desire for delight, their communication with one another and their understanding of the...read more

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson

    Circles is an essay by Ralph Waldo Emerson, first published in 1841. The essay reflects on the vast array of circles one may find throughout nature, and what is suggested by these circles in philosophical terms. In the opening line of the essay Emerson states The eye is the first circle; the horizon which it forms is the second; and throughout nature this primary figure is repeated without...read more

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson

    Emerson's treatise on the nature of friendship. The only reward of virtue is virtue; the only way to have a friend is to be...read more

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson

    Building on and enriching ideas set forth in Self-Reliance, Emerson argues that true heroism is self-confidence and persistency in the face of corrosive pressures to conform to...read more

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson

    The essay on Prudence was given as a lecture in a course on Human Culture, in the winter of 1837-8. It was published in the first series of Essays, which appeared in 1841. In it, Emerson describes Prudence as The virtue of the senses and admits to having little of it in...read more

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson

    Emerson's discourse on the laws of compensation, takes on the notion that one who has money must be wicked and those who do not must be good, among other topics. It appeared in his book Essays, first published in...read more

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson

    The American Scholar was a speech given by Ralph Waldo Emerson in 1837, to the Phi Beta Kappa Society of Harvard College. Emerson argues that American culture, still heavily influenced by Europe, could build a new, distinctly American cultural identity. Emerson uses Transcendentalist and Romantic points of view to explain a true American scholar's relationship to nature. Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. declared this speech to be America's Intellectual Declaration of Independence. Building on the growing attention he was receiving from the essay Nature, this speech solidified Emerson's popularity and weight in...read more

  • Washington Irving

    Warm and delightfully festive, this charming and long forgotten holiday classic was inspired, in part, by Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol and other celebrations of old-time Yule. Splendid suppers, rural churches, cheerful dances, and hearty spirits imbue this short novel with the magic of the...read more

  • David Horowitz

    New York Times bestselling author David Horowitz exposes not only the progressive war against Christianity but also a war against America and its founding principles-which are Christian in their origin. Dark Agenda is about an embattled religion, but, most of all, it is about our imperiled nation. Tackling a broad range of issues from prayer in the schools to the globalist mindset, Horowitz traces the anti-Christian movement to its roots in communism. When the communist empire fell, progressives did not want to give up their utopian anti-God illusions, so instead they merely changed the name of their dream. Instead of "communism," progressives have re-branded their movement as "social...read more

  • L. Brent Bozell

    Lecturer, syndicated columnist, television commentator, debater, marketer, businessman, bestselling author, publisher, and activist L. Brent Bozell III is one of the most outspoken and effective national leaders in the conservative movement today. As the founder and president of the Media Research Center, Mr. Bozell runs the largest media watchdog organization in America and is uniquely positioned to offer this blazing critique of the bias in the national media and how they undermine American democracy. Using coverage of the rise of Donald Trump and his presidency as a case study of sorts, Bozell and his co-author Tim Graham expose all the different types of bias that can occur-both hidden...read more

  • Anthony Jacks

    This book will provide you with all you need to know in terms of negotiation, including the set-up, preparation, and follow-up after the negotiation is...read more

  • Frances Kay

    This guide will enable anyone interested in business success to achieve peak performance by learning how to work more effectively with...read more

  • Anthony Jacks

    This book will show you how to build the skills you need to become a more successful professional, such as developing your skills and competencies, working and partnering with your employer, building strong organizational relationships and increasing your visibility, thriving in your organization's culture, and increasing and applying your business knowledge. It will enable you to achieve peak performance and success by understanding and capitalizing on your strengths and minimizing your...read more

  • Matt Walsh

    The average Christian in America does not know what his own religion teaches, nor does he care. He may call himself "Christian," but he lives his life exactly as he wishes, making no attempt to conform his conduct to the commands and tenets of his religion. Daily Wire writer Matt Walsh confronts his fellow Christians in this bold, clear-eyed book that serves as an urgent reminder of Matthew 7:13 - "For wide is the gate and broad is the road that leads to destruction, and many enter through...read more