Searching for: "Sam Stinson"

  • Saint Ignatius Of Antioch

    Ignatius of Antioch penned these letters to churches (Ephesians, Magnesians, Trallians, Romans, Philadelphians, and Smyrnaeans) and Polycarp on his way to martyrdom. Ignatius was an apologist for the Episcopal style of church government (as opposed to sole rule by a council of presbyters) which developed in the late first or early second century. Eager to die in imitation of his Savior, it was Ignatius who wrote this to the Roman church: "I am God's wheat, and I am ground by the teeth of wild beasts that I may be found pure bread [of Christ]." (Summary by Sam...read more

  • Pope Clement

    "First Clement is one of the oldest Christian documents outside the New Testament canon. The epistle was written by Clement, one of the elders of the church of Rome, to the church in Corinth, where it was read for centuries. Indeed, historians generally hold First Clement to be an authentic document dating from the first century. From the fifth century to the eighth century, many of the eastern churches accepted the First Epistle of Clement as canonical scripture as it is clearly listed among the canonical books of the New Testament in "Canon 85" of the Canons of the Apostles. However, by the end of the eighth century, none of the ancient churches, eastern or western, included First Clement...read more

  • Unknown

    The Didache is the common name of a brief early Christian treatise (dated by most scholars to the late first or early second century), containing instructions for Christian communities. The text, parts of which may have constituted the first written catechism, has three main sections dealing with Christian lessons, rituals such as baptism and eucharist, and Church organization. It was considered by some of the Church Fathers as part of the New Testament but rejected as spurious or non-canonical by others, eventually not accepted into the New Testament canon with the exception of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church "broader canon." The Roman Catholic Church has accepted it as part of the...read more

  • Saint Ignatius Of Antioch

    Ignatius of Antioch penned these letters to churches (Ephesians, Magnesians, Trallians, Romans, Philadelphians, and Smyrnaeans) and Polycarp on his way to martyrdom. Ignatius was an apologist for the Episcopal style of church government (as opposed to sole rule by a council of presbyters) which developed in the late first or early second century. Eager to die in imitation of his Savior, it was Ignatius who wrote this to the Roman church: "I am God's wheat, and I am ground by the teeth of wild beasts that I may be found pure bread [of Christ]." (Summary by Sam...read more

  • Pope Clement I

    "First Clement is one of the oldest Christian documents outside the New Testament canon. The epistle was written by Clement, one of the elders of the church of Rome, to the church in Corinth, where it was read for centuries. Indeed, historians generally hold First Clement to be an authentic document dating from the first century. From the fifth century to the eighth century, many of the eastern churches accepted the First Epistle of Clement as canonical scripture as it is clearly listed among the canonical books of the New Testament in "Canon 85" of the Canons of the Apostles. However, by the end of the eighth century, none of the ancient churches, eastern or western, included First Clement...read more

  • American Standard Version

    "Genesis (Greek: "birth", "origin") is the first book of the Hebrew Bible, and the first of five books of the Pentateuch or Torah. It recounts the world from creation to the descent of the children of Israel into Egypt, and contains some of the best-known accounts of the Old Testament, including Adam and Eve, Cain and Abel, Noah's Ark, the Tower of Babel, and the biblical Patriarchs." (From Wikipedia, modified by Sam...read more

  • American Standard Version

    "Psalms is a book of the Hebrew Bible included in the collected works known as the Writings. Psalms were written by various writers, including Israel's King David. The Book of Psalms is divided into five books: Book 1 -- Psa. 1-41; Book 2 -- Psa. 42-72; Book 3 -- Psa. 73-89; Book 4 -- Psa. 90-106; and Book 5 -- Psa. 107-150. The collection includes the following types of psalm, among others: Psalms for praise, guidance, consolation, recognition of God's creation, the need for repentance. Certain Psalms, such as Psa. 22 and Psa. 110 are accepted by Christians and certain Jews as messianic or containing messianic prophecies." (From Wikipedia, modified by Sam...read more

  • American Standard Version

    Proverbs, a book of the Old Testament, is a collection of pithy Biblical sayings. It is wisdom literature by multiple authors, including Solomon. Throughout the book, Lady Wisdom and Lady Folly struggle to get the attention of the simple, leading them to glory or disgrace. (Summary by Sam...read more

  • Sarah S. Baker

    This book includes the classic alphabet, Sing-A-Song Of Sixpence, The Frog Who Would A Wooing go, The Three LIttle Pigs, Puss In Boot, and The Ugly Duckling. Fun for all ages! (Summary by Sam...read more

  • Douay-Rheims Version

    1 Maccabees is an apocryphal/deuterocanonical book written by a Jewish author after the restoration of an independent Jewish kingdom, probably about 100 BC. It is included in the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox canons. Protestants, Jews, and some others regard it as generally reliable historically, but not a part of Scripture. The setting of the book is about a century after the conquest of Judea by the Greeks under Alexander the Great, after Alexander's empire has been divided so that Judea was part of the Greek Seleucid Empire. It tells how the Greek ruler Antiochus IV Epiphanes attempted to suppress the practice of basic Jewish religious law, resulting in a Jewish revolt against Seleucid...read more

  • Douay-Rheims Version

    The Book of Baruch consists of exhortation to Jews in exile to accept exile, hope for the mercy of God, and resist the temptation to worship idols of the nations. The Book of Baruch, occasionally referred to as 1 Baruch, is called a deuterocanonical or apocryphal book of the Bible. Although not in the Hebrew Bible, it is found in the Greek Bible (LXX) and in the Vulgate Bible, and also in Theodotion's Version. There it is found among the prophetical books which also include Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, Daniel, and the twelve minor prophets. It is named after Baruch ben Neriah, Jeremiah's scribe. Scholars propose that it was written during or shortly after the period of the...read more

  • Douay-Rheims Version

    The book tells the alleged story of a righteous Israelite of the Tribe of Naphtali named Tobit living in Nineveh after the deportation of the northern tribes of Israel to Assyria in 721 BC under Sargon II. (Summary by Wikipedia, modified by Sam...read more

  • Douay-Rheims Version

    Wisdom is one of the apocryphal/deuterocanonical books of the Bible. It is a wisdom book, bearing similarity to the canonical works. Scholars believe that the book represents the most classical Greek language found in the Septuagint, having been written during the Jewish Hellenistic period (the 1st or 2nd century BC). The author of the text appears well versed in the popular philosophical, religious, and ethical writings adopted by Hellenistic Alexandria. According to St. Melito in the second century AD, it was considered canonical by Jews and Christians,[1] and a Hebrew translation of the Wisdom of Solomon is mentioned by Na?manides in the preface to his commentary on the Pentateuch.The...read more

  • King James Version

    The preface to the KJV Bible is fitting to read, as it reminds contemporary readers of the transitory nature of all Bible translations. The preface is a necessary, though often unread, gift from the translators to readers of the KJV. If you read this preface, or hear it, you will be able to unravel many false teachings associated with the exclusive use of one Version. It not only defends the work of the translators, it defends the necessity of a translation for the time and place, to speak in a voice understandable to a contemporary audience. Listen to this preface for a greater appreciation of the work of these fine men. (Summary by Sam...read more

  • Various Contributors

    The Didache is the common name of a brief early Christian treatise (dated by most scholars to the late first or early second century), containing instructions for Christian communities. The text, parts of which may have constituted the first written catechism, has three main sections dealing with Christian lessons, rituals such as baptism and eucharist, and Church organization. It was considered by some of the Church Fathers as part of the New Testament but rejected as spurious or non-canonical by others, eventually not accepted into the New Testament canon with the exception of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church "broader canon." The Roman Catholic Church has accepted it as part of the...read more

  • Various Authors

    A collection of children's alphabet rhymes including Footsteps On the Road to Learning - a short text from 1850 which teaches children the English alphabet in rime--so that a child may not become a dunce! The Anti Slavery Alphabet - a book prepared to encourage young children to speak against the institution of slavery in 19th century United States. The method used is an alphabetical listing of the evils of slavery. The Peter Pan Alphabet and The Alphabet of Celebrities - Oliver Herford's teaching guides to the English alphabet--using Peter Pan and famous names! (Summary by Sam Stinson and...read more

  • Anonymous

    "The Keepsake, or, Poems and Pictures For Childhood and Youth", is a collection of twenty pastoral poems published as one collection in London, 1818. The topics are moral encouragement for children, young and old alike. (Summary by Sam...read more

  • Lord Alfred Tennyson

    A collection of Tennyson's poetry: 1 The Brook - 00:16 2 Song from "Maud" - 1:20 3 A Farewell - 2:34 4 Song from “Maud” - 3:26 5 Break, Break, Break - 4:53 6 From “Locksley Hall”- 5:43 7 Song from “Maud” - 6:43 8 Song from “The Princess” - 7:43 9 Lillian - 8:37 10 Ring out, Wild Bells - 9:52 11 From “The Princess” - 11:27 12 Song From “The Princess” - 12:43 13 From “Enoch Arden” - 13:58 14 From “Enoch Arden” - 15:36 15 The Charge of the Light Brigade- 16:56 16 From “The May Queen” - 18:51 17 Song from “The Princess” - 19:36 18 From “Harold” - 20:14 19 From “The Revenge” - 21:28 (From Sam...read more

  • William Shakespeare

    Romeo and Juliet is an early tragedy by William Shakespeare about two teenage "star-cross'd lovers" whose "untimely deaths" ultimately unite their feuding households. The play has been highly praised by literary critics for its language and dramatic effect. It was among Shakespeare's most popular plays during his lifetime and, along with Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays. Its influence is still seen today, with the two main characters being widely represented as archetypal young...read more

  • William Blake

    Songs of Innocence and of Experience: Shewing the Two Contrary States of the Human Soul are two books of poetry by the English poet and painter, William Blake. Although Songs of Innocence was first published by itself in 1789, it is believed that Songs of Experience has always been published in conjunction with Innocence since its completion in 1794. Songs of Innocence mainly consists of poems describing the innocence and joy of the natural world, advocating free love and a closer relationship with God, and most famously including Blake’s poem The Lamb. Its poems have a generally light, upbeat and pastoral feel and are typically written from the perspective of children or written about...read more