Searching for: "Sean Murphy"

  • Jack London

    When White Fang was first published in 1906, Jack London was well on his way to becoming one of the most famous, popular, and highly paid writers in the world. White Fang stands out as one of his finest achievements, a spellbinding novel of life in the northern wilds. In gripping detail, London bares the savage realities of the battle for survival among all species in a harsh, unyielding environment. White Fang is part wolf, part dog, a ferocious and magnificent creature through whose experiences we see and feel essential rhythms and patterns of life in the animal kingdom and among mankind as well. It is, above all, a novel that keenly observes the extraordinary working of one of nature's...read more

  • Booker T. Washington

    Up from Slavery is the 1901 autobiography of Booker T. Washington sharing his personal experience of having to work to rise up from the position of a slave child during the Civil War, to the difficulties and obstacles he overcame to get an education at the new Hampton Institute, to his work establishing the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama to help black people learn useful, marketable skills and work to pull themselves up by the bootstraps. He reflects on the generosity of both teachers and philanthropists who helped in educating blacks and Native Americans. He describes his efforts to instill manners, breeding, health and a feeling of dignity to...read more

  • Annie Mccartney

    All three series of the BBC radio sitcom about the people of Marlborough Road, Belfast The bohemian inhabitants of Marlborough Road lead lives of barely-contained chaos, full of demands, distractions and domestic dramas. Fortunately, they have one person they can count on when things go wrong - Sally, their cleaning lady-cum-therapist. When highly-strung Clare at Number 25 gets in a flap over a dinner guest, or needs a babysitter for her free-range children, Sally steps in. Saffron, the multi-tasking New Age mum at Number 27, would be lost without Sally, and two doors down at Number 29, Miss Edith Black relies on Sally's help when it comes to sorting out authentic Victorian railings...read more

  • Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

    Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. He is the creation of Scottish born author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A brilliant London-based detective, Holmes is famous for his intellectual prowess, and is renowned for his skillful use of deductive reasoning (somewhat mistakenly - see inductive reasoning) and astute observation to solve difficult cases. He is arguably the most famous fictional detective in this collection you will find: • A Study in Scarlet • The Sign of the Four • The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes • The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes • The Hound of the...read more

  • Herman Melville

    Published in 1866, Battle-Pieces and Aspects of the War is a collection of poems about the Civil War by Herman Melville. Many of the poems are inspired by second- and third-hand accounts from print news sources (especially the Rebellion Record) and from family and friends. A handful of trips Melville took before, during, and after the war provide additional angles of vision into the battles, the personalities, and the moods of war. In an opening note, Melville describes his project not so much as a systematic chronicle (though many of the individual poems refer to specific events) but as a kind of memory piece of national experience. The 'aspects' to which he refers in the title are as...read more

  • Leo Tolstoy

    In the winter of 1854 Tolstoy, then an officer in the Russian army, arranged to be transferred to the besieged town of Sebastopol. Wishing to see at first hand the action of what would become known as the Crimean War, he was spurred on by a fierce patriotism, but also by an equally fierce desire to alert the authorities to appalling conditions in the army. The three 'Sebastopol Sketches' - December', May' and August' - re-create what happened during different phases of the siege and its effect on the ordinary men around him. Writing with the truth as his utmost aim, he brought home to Russia's entire literate public the atrocities of war. In doing so, he realized his own vocation as a...read more

  • Honoré De Balzac

    Sarrasine is a novella written by Honoré de Balzac. It was published in 1830, and is part of his Human Comedy . Around midnight during a ball the narrator is sitting at a window, out of sight, admiring the garden. He overhears the conversations of passers-by regarding the origins of the wealth of the mansion's owner, Monsieur de Lanty. There is also the presence of an unknown old man around the house, whom the family was oddly devoted to, and who frightened and intrigued the partygoers. When the man sits next to the narrator's guest, Beatrix Rochefide, she touches him, and the narrator rushes her out of the room. The narrator says he knows who the man is and says he will tell her his...read more

  • Rudyard Kipling

    This Audiobook contains the Collection of Rudyard Kipling: - The jungle book - Just So Stories - Kim - Captains Courageous - Mowgli: All of the Mowgli Stories from the Jungle Books - Puck of Pook's Hill - France At War On the Frontier of Civilization - Letters of Travel - A Fleet In Being - The Fringes Of The Fleet - American...read more

  • L.M. Montgomery

    Rilla of Ingleside (1921) is the eighth of nine books in the Anne of Green Gables series by Lucy Maud Montgomery, but was the sixth 'Anne' novel in publication order. This book draws the focus back onto a single character, Anne and Gilbert's youngest daughter Bertha Marilla 'Rilla' Blythe. It has a more serious tone, as it takes place during World War I and the three Blythe boys—Jem, Walter, and Shirley—along with Rilla's sweetheart Ken Ford, and playmates Jerry Meredith and Carl Meredith—end up fighting in Europe with the Canadian Expeditionary...read more

  • Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

    The Return of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of 13 Sherlock Holmes stories, originally published in 1903-1904, by Arthur Conan Doyle. This was the first Holmes collection since 1893, when Holmes had 'died' in The Final Problem. Having published The Hound of the Baskervilles in 1901-1902 (although setting it before Holmes' death) Doyle came under intense pressure to revive his famous character. The first story is set in 1894 and has Holmes returning in London and explaining the period from 1891-94, a period called 'The Great Hiatus' by Sherlockian enthusiasts. Also of note is Watson's statement in the last story of the cycle that Holmes has retired, and forbids him to publish any more...read more

  • Khalil Gibran

    The Prophet is a book of 26 poetic essays written in English in 1923 by the Lebanese-American artist, philosopher and writer Khalil Gibran. In the book, the prophet Almustafa who has lived in the foreign city of Orphalese for 12 years is about to board a ship which will carry him home. He is stopped by a group of people, with whom he discusses many issues of life and the human condition. The book is divided into chapters dealing with love, marriage, children, giving, eating and drinking, work, joy and sorrow, houses, clothes, buying and selling, crime and punishment, laws, freedom, reason and passion, pain, self-knowledge, teaching, friendship, talking, time, good and evil, prayer,...read more

  • Jack London

    Jack London lived for a time within the grim and grimy world of the East End of London, where half a million people scraped together hardly enough on which to survive. Even if they were able to work, they were paid only enough to allow them a pitiful existence. He grew to know and empathise with these forgotten (or ignored) people as he spoke with them and tasted the workhouse, life on the streets, ... and the food, which was cheap, barely nutritious, and foul. He writes about his experiences in a fluid and narrative style, making it very clear what he thinks of the social structures which created the Abyss, and of the millionaires who live high on the labours of a people forced to live in...read more

  • L. Frank Baum

    Welcome to the Wonderful World of Oz! All fourteen of L. Frank Baum's Oz books, in order and unabridged. included: 1. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) 2. The Marvelous Land of Oz (1904) 3. Ozma of Oz (1907) 4. Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz (1908) 5. The Road to Oz (1909) 6. The Emerald City of Oz (1910) 7. The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1913) 8. Tik-Tok of Oz (1914) 9. The Scarecrow of Oz (1915) 10. Rinkitink in Oz (1916) 11. The Lost Princess of Oz (1917) 12. The Tin Woodman of Oz (1918) 13. The Magic of Oz (1919) 14. Glinda of Oz...read more

  • G.K Chesterton

    Orthodoxy (1908) is a book by G. K. Chesterton that has become a classic of Christian apologetics. Chesterton considered this book a companion to his other work, Heretics. In the book's preface Chesterton states the purpose is to 'attempt an explanation, not of whether the Christian Faith can be believed, but of how he personally has come to believe it.' In it, Chesterton presents an original view of Christian religion. He sees it as the answer to natural human needs, the 'answer to a riddle' in his own words, and not simply as an arbitrary truth received from somewhere outside the boundaries of human...read more

  • G.K Chesterton

    Orthodoxy (1908) is a book by G. K. Chesterton that has become a classic of Christian apologetics. Chesterton considered this book a companion to his other work, Heretics. In the book's preface Chesterton states the purpose is to 'attempt an explanation, not of whether the Christian Faith can be believed, but of how he personally has come to believe it.' In it, Chesterton presents an original view of Christian religion. He sees it as the answer to natural human needs, the 'answer to a riddle' in his own words, and not simply as an arbitrary truth received from somewhere outside the boundaries of human...read more

  • Jane Austen

    Jane Austen's first novel—published posthumously in 1818—tells the story of Catherine Morland and her dangerously sweet nature, innocence, and sometime self-delusion. Though Austen's fallible heroine is repeatedly drawn into scrapes while vacationing at Bath and during her subsequent visit to Northanger Abbey, Catherine eventually triumphs, blossoming into a discerning woman who learns truths about love, life, and the heady power of literature. The satirical novel pokes fun at the gothic novel while earnestly emphasizing caution to the female...read more

  • Jack London

    This is the story of a voyage of a sailing ship from Baltimore to Seattle, east-to-west around Cape Horn in the winter. It is set in 1913 and the glory days of 'wooden ships and iron men' are long over. The Elsinore is a four-masted iron sailing vessel carrying a cargo of 5000 tons of coal. She has a 'bughouse' crew of misfits and incompetents. This book was published in 1915 and some actions of some of the characters seem odd to us today. There is romance, but it is strangely platonic. Two important characters disappear with no real explanation. The disparity between the officers on the one hand and the fo'c'sle on the other is striking (literally). Some people will be offended by the...read more

  • James Allen

    One of the first great modern writers of motivational and inspirational books, James Allen has influenced millions around the world through his classic work As a Man Thinketh. In the same way, As a Man Does: Morning and Evening Thoughts presents beautiful and insightful meditations to feed the mind and soul. In each of the sixty-two meditations--one for each morning and evening of the month--Allen offers both the force of truth and the blessing of comfort. The meditations presented in As a Man Doesare spiritual jewels of wisdom, reflecting the deepest experiences of the heart. As a book, its mission is simple: To lift the soul of its reader--'in the hours of work and leisure, in the days of...read more

  • Edgar Rice Burroughs

    Men or Monsters? What were those thirteen hulking brutes Professor Maxon had created in his laboratory? Soulless, malformed, brainless they were, nevertheless composed of flesh and blood and endowed with the spark of life. Only number 13 was the redeeming feature of this grewsome experiment, for he was a perfect specimen of a man, but he, too, was soulless. Unconsciously he was the cause of the most diabolical plans Professor Maxon had yet concocted--his beautiful daughter Virginia was to marry this monster. From ERBville...read more

  • Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

    The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, the consulting detective's notoriety as the arch-despoiler of the schemes concocted by the criminal underworld at last gets the better of him. Though Holmes and his faithful sidekick Dr Watson solve what will become some of their most bizarre and extraordinary cases - the disappearance of the race horse Silver Blaze, the horrific circumstances of the Greek Interpreter and the curious mystery of the Musgrave Ritual among them - a criminal mastermind is plotting the downfall of the great...read more