Searching for: "Willie Rushton"

  • Willie Rushton

    Career highlights from one of this country’s funniest satirists and comedy men. Willie Rushton’s career spanned decades, from the cutting edge satire of television’s 'That Was The Week That Was' to the razor-sharp punnery and verbal wizardry of Radio’s 'I’m Sorry I Haven’t a Clue'. Actor, writer, lyricist and veteran satirist, this is Rushton at his magical best – in 'The Wind in the Willows' and 'Gulliver’s Travels', with Roy Plomley on 'Desert Island Discs', reading 'Winnie the Pooh' and slogging it out on 'Trivia Test Match'. 'Remembering... Willie Rushton' features appearances by Barry Cryer, Kenny Everett, Brian Johnston, Humphrey Lyttelton, Sue MacGregor and Ned...read more

  • G K Chesterton

    Five full-cast BBC Radio dramatisations of short stories by GK Chesterton, starring Leslie French as Father Brown and Willie Rushton as Chesterton. Short, shabby and unassuming, Roman Catholic priest Father Brown is an unlikely investigator. But his keen mind and understanding of human nature enable him to solve cases featuring a master criminal and a precious silver relic; a theft at an exclusive hotel; a strange tower and an even stranger story; black magic – and white magic; and a murdered judge. Created in 1910, Father Brown inhabited the pages of over fifty short stories before appearing in adaptations for film, radio, theatre and television, including his recent incarnation...read more

  • Iain Pattinson

    If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to attend a live recording of I’m Sorry I Haven’t a Clue, the antidote to panel games, now is your chance to discover how much fun they are! These two extended editions of the programme, from 1995 and 1996, offer an exclusive glimpse behind the scenes, in the company of players Graeme Garden, Barry Cryer, Tim Brooke-Taylor, Willie Rushton and Jeremy Hardy. Hear Humph and the team setting up before and after a recording, catch the jokes intended only for the theatre audiences (including the naughty bits!), listen to Barry and Graeme as 'Alec and Denzil', early ancestors of their much-loved 'Hamish and Dougal' creations, and thrill to...read more

  • Iain Pattinson

    For everyone who’s ever wanted to attend a live recording of 'I’m Sorry I Haven’t a Clue', but never had the opportunity, here’s your chance to catch the complete Clue experience. From out-takes and ad-libs to asides to the audience - including some very cheeky banter - here are all the bits you never get to hear on the radio, as well as all the puns, songs, silly games and sparkling comedy that you’ve come to expect from the Clue team. These two specially extended compilations, from 1995 and 1996, feature players Graeme Garden, Barry Cryer, Tim Brooke-Taylor and Willie Rushton, with introductions by Clue producer Jon Naismith. Proceedings are chaired by the late, great...read more

  • Graeme Garden

    A sparkling collection of specials and spin-offs from the award-winning BBC Radio 4 comedy show, plus two tributes to the legendary Humphrey Lyttelton. This third and final Clue treasury features a panoply of specials based around the perennial ‘antidote to panel games’. In the mix are I’m Sorry I Haven’t a Christmas Clue, featuring the team’s unique interpretation of A Christmas Carol; Humph in Wonderland, in which they venture down a rabbit hole; and In Search of Mornington Crescent, in which Andrew Marr peers behind the veil of secrecy surrounding that illustrious game. Also included are two shows commemorating the programme’s inimitable original host, the late,...read more

  • Brian Johnston

    Brian Johnston, aka ‘Johnners’, the BBC’s long-time cricket commentator, is the umpire in this test of wit and general knowledge, as two teams try to score the highest number of runs under his watchful eye. In these four episodes, team captains Tim Rice and Willie Rushton are joined by Stephen Fry, Paul Merton, Tim Brooke-Taylor, Barry Cryer, Bill Tidy, Caroline Quentin, Bernard Cribbins and Robin Bailey. But which questions will they go for? The easier ‘single’ worth just one run? Or will they try the harder question and attempt a ‘boundary’ (four runs)? Can the batting team reach six questions (an ‘over’) before the other team gets a go? And there’s every chance...read more