Book Rating (16)
Narrator Rating (8)

The Drop Box: How 500 Abandoned Babies, an Act of Compassion, and a Movie Changed My Life Forever

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Author:

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Length:

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,

Brandon Batchelar

4 Hours 22 Minutes

Oasis Audio

March 2015

Audio Book Summary

He traveled to South Korea to film an amazing rescue . . . his own.
Brian Ivie was filled with compassion as he read a Los Angeles Times article about Pastor Lee’s solution to unwanted newborns in South Korea — a baby drop box.
 Brian traveled halfway around the world to film the documentary The Drop Box. But God had even bigger plans. For in the midst of filming the plight of these abandoned and broken babies, Brian realized his own spiritual brokenness.
 At its heart, this is a story of spiritual orphans — young and old — discovering their true identity as children of God.

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Reviews

  • Katie Reed

    I thought it would be more about the actual drop box and not so much about how the author became a Christian.

    Book Rating

  • Josi King

    I really enjoyed this book. It was engaging and left me wanting to jet to South Korea.

    Book Rating

  • Amanda Krzywonski

    A wonderful audiobook that I am so glad I stumbled upon. Honestly wasn't sure if I would like it, but fell in love with it within 10 minutes of listening. Written beautifully and left me smiling as I heard the last chapter. Shows us the different workshops of life that God walks us through before we get to where we dreamed of being.

    Book Rating

  • Julia Baldridge

    I was surprised by this book. Found it a good listen and inspiring

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  • Heather Beatty-Eastman

    It's good for a quick listen. The author is often self-deprecating - which makes the point that he's trying to put forth difficult to fully appreciate.

    Book Rating